Listening to Coronal Mass Ejections, close to the source

(photo: Spaceweather.com)

Shortwave radio listeners know that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) often disturbing our SWLing. More than once I’ve been in the middle of listening to a broadcast, or even chatting with a fellow radio amateur on the HF spectrum and the effects from a CME would, in essence, wipe us out.

CMEs, in fact, have been getting a lot of publicity as of late. Now’s your chance to hear whatone sounds like–a little closer to the source:

[The following video] is a sonification of the recent solar storm activity turns data from two spacecraft into sound. It uses measurements from the NASA SOHO spacecraft and the University of Michigan’s Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) on NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft at Mercury. The creator is Robert Alexander, a design science doctoral student at the University of Michigan and NASA fellow.

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