The connection between Hallicrafters and 1940s electronic warfare

A B24′s Hallicrafters S27 (Photo: AAFRadio.org)

One of my favorite ham radio blogs is that of John (AE5X). Like me, he’s a QRPer–meaning, as amateur radio operators, we love making contacts across this great globe of ours using very low power…typically 5 watts or less. The challenge is fun, the medium is magical.

John’s also a radio historian and shortwave radio listener. Yesterday, he posted a most fascinating look at how the Hallicrafters S27s played an important role during World War II countering very innovative radio guidance techniques by the Third Reich.

You should bookmark John’s blog, as he post many radio related topics that the SWL would find enjoyable, whether it be about numbers stations, QSLs or even his own experience learning Russian via shortwave.

But first, read: Hallicrafters and electronic warfare in 1940 on 10 meters. . .or, an ‘Aspirin’ for the ‘Headache’

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5 Responses to The connection between Hallicrafters and 1940s electronic warfare

  1. John AE5X says:

    Thanks for the nice words Thomas, though I should point out that I’m only a part-time QRPer. You’re absolutely right about having a love of radio’s history – there’s a lot rich history involving radio’s many aspects and I enjoy bringing it a bit more into the public eye for kindred spirits.

    73 – John

    • Thomas says:

      Hey, you’ve got QRP in your blood, that’s what matters. :) I really liked your post on learning Russian via shortwave. Though I listened to language lessons as a kid, and RFI’s Francais Facile, I never had the dedication to actually learn a language. Very cool some of that has stuck with you over the years.

      73
      Thomas

  2. Pingback: The connection between Hallicrafters and 1940s electronic warfare … « kimmblog

  3. Dan says:

    Check out the fifth picture from the top. Look at the upper left corner of the picture. At the top of the rack, looks like an S27

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