BBG tries to improve employee morale

BBG-LogoIn December 2012, we posted a survey from the 2012 edition of The Best Places to Work in the Federal Government by The Partnership for Public Service and Deloitte. The survey indicated that the Broadcasting Board of Governers (BBG) had been ranked in the bottom five places to work in the federal government.

According to the Washington Post, the agency is now working on a plan to boost employee morale. Some of their initiatives include:

“Agency directors and senior staff hold[ing] face-time sessions in the cafeteria for informal talks with employees, a “Civility Campaign” addresses labor-management issues, and a Workplace Engagement Initiative takes a deeper dive into the agency’s low morale ratings.

Some of the morale-boosting events are meant to be fun, such as the raffle during the fitness-center open house, a chocolate bake-off in time for Valentine’s Day, and ?after-work gatherings — a bingo night, happy hour, checkers and chess.

It’s going to take all that and some sustained work to improve the agency’s failing report cards.”

Read the full article on The Washington Post…

Many thanks to Richard Cuff for the tip!

This entry was posted in Broadcasters, International Broadcasting, News, Shortwave Radio and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to BBG tries to improve employee morale

  1. Sand Track says:

    This Washington Post story makes the same mistake that many writers
    on the outside of this troubled agency make, which is to give too much
    credibility to the existing management structure to understand what problems
    are and fix them, which would not be easy given the long, sorry track record
    of the BBG/IBB.

    The new Board has moved aggressively to make changes, removing (though
    done in usual Washington diplomatic style) people like Dick Lobo, and taking
    other steps. But the mismanagement and morale morass is so deep and
    profound that most observers agree it will take years to correct the across-the-board
    damage done through the first decade of the 21st century and into the second.

    Indeed, the question that must be asked at this point is: is it worth it for
    American taxpayers to continue to maintain, at an annual cost of $700 million,
    a government-funded organization that is attempting to be all things media,
    when it has not been given the funding and technical capabilities for the task.

    As ironic as it may seem, at a time when the Chinese and Russians have
    invested billions in modern, efficient global TV broadcast operations, it may
    actually be time to consider — SHUTTING DOWN THE VOICE OF AMERICA,
    and reviewing ALL of the remaining taxpayer-funded outlets.

    • TP Reitzel says:

      I agree. Frankly, the disappearance of publicly funded broadcasters such as the VOA, ABC, etc is long overdue. The commercial market of shortwave will thrive when it finally adopts a modern, sustainable technology like DRM with its xHE-AAC codec. With the standardization of xHE-AAC, we’re close to seeing the beginning of such a revival so the disappearance of publicly funded broadcasters will only help to clear the bands of unwanted (by me) interference.

  2. LYNN KELLY says:

    WHILE DRM HAS PROVEN TO BE VERY VIABLE ON VHF FOR LINE OF SIGHT TRANSMISSIONS OD ABOUT 100 KILOMETERS OR LESS PERFECT FOR EUROPE WITH ITS DENSE POPULATION IT HAS PROVEN LIKE AM BAND IBOC TO BE A DISASTER ON THE UNSTABLE MW AND SHORTWAVE BANDS

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