Can you help George identify a Radio Moscow tune?

Radio_Moscow_logoGeorge Stein, a subscriber to the Shortwave Radio Audio Archive writes:

“When I used to listen to Radio Moscow back in the mid- to late 1960s, they used to play a little ditty just after they came on the air (at least in English). This tune was NOT the “Moscow Nights” tune so often heard. As I recall it was a lively tune.

On one of my many trips to St. Petersburg in the 90s and the 00s, I would often visit the memorial to the WW2 Leningrad siege, specifically the museum underneath. One time, I heard the melody I am looking for. I was told by someone there, that this melody was played during the siege as a signal that “all is clear” (I presume from German bombing).

I would be grateful if anyone has any information or a copy of this melody.”

Can you help George identify this tune?  If so, please comment!

This entry was posted in Music, Nostalgia, Radio History and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Can you help George identify a Radio Moscow tune?

  1. Scott says:

    Radio Moscow used “Wide Is My Motherland” as their interval signal back in the day. Check it out here (and tons more).

    http://www.intervalsignals.net/…/russia-vintage_state.htm

  2. Scott says:

    George – If the link just takes you to the main page, then look for RUSSIA – Vintage Clips (State & Municipal Broadcasters). Clip go back as far as 1951.

  3. Stan says:

    I was “Midnight in Moscow” by Kenny Ball. A dixieland tune.

  4. Paul McCabe says:

    The 1961 Radio Moscow recording from Interval Signal net is not “Wide Is My Motherland”
    but Was the “Communist International” which was the Soviet National Anthem until about 1945.
    The 1968 recording of Radio Peking also used the “International” at the start of their Broadcast The announcer heard on 1961 Radio Moscow Broadcast was Sergei Ruken, who was American born, and died about 1974. In the late 1950s. Their signature tune was “Song of the Homeland”
    The World service, Of Radio Moscow tune, of “Midnight in Moscow” was originally called “Evening in the Moscow Countryside” and was first heard about 1960. Radio Moscow announcer Nokolai Kornikof used to sing a English translation over Radio Moscows North American Service.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


6 − = three

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>