Monthly Archives: March 2017

KIMF: A new shortwave broadcasting station in Nevada

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Tom Servo, who writes:

While going through the FCC Daily Digest for my own hobby website, I came across the International Authorizations section and happened to take a look today. To my surprise, a license to cover has been filed for HF station KIMF in Beowawe, NV! I can’t remember the last time a new HF station filed to go on the air in the US.

Do you know anything about this station? Here is a link to the FCC’s data page on the station; I’ve attached a PDF copy of the license form, which lists both the operating frequencies as well as times, power and modes they’ve asked for. It looks like they will run a combination of AM and USB across three frequencies.

[…]I went to the license coordinates to see if anything was visible on Google Satellite View, but it’s just empty desert. So I have no idea what’s really going on, but generally once a license to cover is filed, that means the station is built and ready to go on the air. At least in the world of AM, FM and TV broadcasting!

Here’s the frequencies/times/power/mode listed in the PDF, in case you can’t view it:

6065 kHz – 01-06 UTC 50 kW AM
9300 kHz – 08-12 UTC 100 kHz USB
13570 kHz – 00-04 UTC 100 kW USB

Anyway, I figure you or one of the intrepid readers of your blog will have the scoop. Thanks for your time!

Click here to download the KIMF station license application (PDF).

Wow–many thanks, Tom! This filing catches me by surprise as well, but it does ring a bell. Perhaps an IMF representative contacted me in the past or I met someone from IMF at the Dayton Hamvention? I simply can’t remember.

Based on the application, IMF had to file for an extension due to several delays in building the transmitter site in Nevada. I’m guessing the Google satellite imagery was taken before site construction began.

It appears International Missions Fellowship (the parent organization who is filing this FCC application) currently operate the Radio Missiones International station in Tegucigalpa, Honduras on 3340 and 5010 kHz.

Here’s a note about the Nevada transmission site from the IMF website:

In the USA we have purchased a property near Battle Mountain, NV where we are working to build a powerful Shortwave Station which will be beamed at Mexico and Asia. It can be heard also in North America. We plan to build more stations after this. We have also just built a radio control center and small studio in Corona, CA to send programs to these transmitters via satellite/internet. It is now in operation. You can hear KIMF by clicking on the IMF Missionary Radio link below.

Listen to IMF Missionary Radio
Listen to Radio MI, Honduras

Post readers: Can anyone shed some more light on KIMF and this license to cover?  Please comment!

From the Isle of Music & Uncle Bill’s Melting Pot, week of March 26-April 1


From the Isle of Music, Week of March 26- April 1, 2017
This week, in honor of the International Rueda de Casino Multi Flash Mob day that takes place April 1, our special guest Juanito Gómez, a leading figure in the Rueda de Casino dance movement in Cuba, will discuss the development of the Rueda de Casino phenomenon (in Spanish), and we also will have some excellent Cuban dance music that is popular with casineros.
Three opportunities to listen via shortwave:
1. For the Americas and parts of Western Europe:
WBCQ, 7490 KHz, Tuesdays 0000-0100 UTC (Mondays 8pm-9pm EDT in the Americas)
2. For Europe and beyond,
Channel 292, 6070 KHz, Fridays 1100-1200 UTC (1200-1300 CET) and Saturdays 1200-1300 UTC (1300-1400 CET)

Episode 5 of Uncle Bill’s Melting Pot, a musical variety program that features genres from A-Z, will air on WBCQ the Planet, 7490 KHz, Thursday, March 30 from 2300-2330 UTC (7:00pm-7:30pm EDT in the Americas). Brought to you by Tilford Productions, which also brings you From the Isle of Music.   
(We aren’t showing on the WBCQ website yet, but we’ll be on.)
Check us out, and let us know what you think! Reception has been quite good in parts of Western Europe of late.
Episode 5 is our belated “welcome” to Spring and the related time change.

Vatican Radio’s English shortwave service to Asia ends

(Source: Vatican Radio via London Shortwave)

Vatican Radio’s English SW broadcast to Asia come to an end

Vatican Radio’s English shortwave broadcast for Asia has come to an end, with its last transmission going out Friday evening, after nearly 60 years of service.  However this does not mean it has disappeared altogether. What ultimately closed on March 24 as Vatican Radio’s English Service for Asia, is however very much alive online on Vatican Radio’s website.  The gradual phasing out of Vatican Radio’s shortwave frequencies is seen as part of the reform of the Roman Curia or the central administration of the Catholic Church here in the Vatican, called for by Pope Francis.  The Pope established the new dicastery or office of the Secretariat for Communications on June 27, 2015, ?bringing 9 media bodies of the Vatican, including Vatican Radio, under the Secretariat’s direction, with the purpose of overhauling, streamlining and ultimately merging them as a cohesive unit.

What ended on March 24 as Vatican Radio’s English Service for Asia began way back in 1958. The only ?English programme of Vatican Radio then, headed by Jesuit Father Thomas O’Donnell, was repeated a number of times in different directions, ?including towards Africa and South Asia.   It was a weekly 10-minute news broadcast  for India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.   However, the need for special programmes adapted to the ?distinctive cultural needs and tastes of Africa and South Asia gave way to independent programmes for ?these two regions.   ?In 1964 South Asia got a boost when Pope Paul VI visited Bombay (today Mumbai), India for the 38th International Eucharistic Congress from 2nd to 5th of December.  Hence in May 1965, the Indian Section officially came into being with a 10-minute broadcast twice a week each in the evening in Hindi, Tamil and Malayalam , while English went on air daily Monday through Saturday.   In 1982, all the four languages began re-broadcasting their evening programmes the following morning.   Three years later – on May 12, 1985, the Malayalam programme got extra airing time, broadcasting for 15 minutes in the morning, whereas the rest continued broadcasting for 10 minutes.

In 1986, Pope John Paul II visited India from January 31 to February 11.   Just prior to this visit, on January 7th that year, Hindi, Tamil and English were given extra time, and so all the four languages began broadcasting daily for 15 minutes each, in the morning, which was a feature programme.  The evening transmission consisted of 6 minutes of news only.   By the end of 1986 the evening 6-minute news increased to 10 minutes and was repeated the following morning.

On March 25, 1990, Hindi, Tamil Malayalam and English began broadcasting for 15 minutes each, repeating it the following morning.  And from Sept. 23, 1993, the four languages were transmitting for nearly 20 minutes each, repeating the evening programme twice the following morning.

It was on Oct 24, 1993 that the fifth language, Urdu, that is spoken mainly in Pakistan but is also widely followed in India, especially in the north, was added to the Indian Section.  It began with a 7-minute Sunday programme, as part of the Hindi programme.  On March 30, 2003 Urdu became a stand-alone programme, broadcasting for 15-minutes on Sundays and Wednesdays, and repeated the following mornings.  The Urdu programme however closed down in  September, 2013, after nearly 20 ?years of service.

On May 16, 2015, Vatican Radio marked the 50th anniversary of its Indian programmes with a ?Holy ?Mass and a reception.

Read this full article at Vatican Radio.

Dan sheds light on various Hammarlund SP-600 models

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Daniel Hawkins, who leaves the following comment in reply to our previous post about the Northern Radio SP-600 and discussion about diversity operation. Dan writes:

Diversity operation: two or more receivers and antennas used to copy CW or RTTY from one or more transmitters.

Most of the Hammarlund SP-600s were models built for diversity use including the well-known JX-17, the most common SP-600. Diversity models can be used as single receivers. In this eBay example Northern Radio has modified a SP-600 J-11 for diversity use.

SP-600 nomenclature: J means joint army/navy (JAN) mil-spec components. L means low frequency. X means crystal frequency control in addition to VFO. My SP-600 is a JX-21, which is not a diversity model. Higher model numbers do not necessarily mean later production dates. All SP-600s use the same serial number sequence regardless of model. Somewhere between serial numbers 15,000 and 17,000 (mid 1950’s) Hammarlund stopped using molded black beauty capacitors and switched to installing ceramic capacitors.

The two-digit model numbers indicate model types. JX-1, 7, 10 and 21 were similar non-diversity receivers. SP-600s built for military contracts will have an additional tag showing the military model number(s).

Here is a great page showing Northern Radio modified SP-600s in action with accompanying Northern Radio RTTY gear.

http://www.navy-radio.com/rcvrs/frr28.htm

Thanks for the primer, Dan! I believe I have one of the X models with crystal control, but I’ll need to verify once back home. Any other SP-600 owners out there in the Post readership?

Exceedingly rare Northern Radio modified SP-600

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Dan Robinson, who writes:

Those of us who still use SP-600s, and those of us who once did but can’t deal with them in retirement, lust after some of the rarer versions of the radio. This is one of them, the Northern Radio modified SP-600.

Click here to view on eBay.

Wow! Many thanks for the tip, Dan!

I must say that when Dan finds these rare treasures on eBay, they usually carry a very hefty price.  In my opinion, this is a good deal for a rare SP-600. Best of all, it has a BuyItNow price, so first-come, first serve and no bidding up the amount.  The shipping price is a bargain considering this radio probably weights upwards of 80 lbs.

This SP-600 may need some electrical restoration and possible re-capping. It’s listed as: “For parts or not working.” If you’ve been looking for an SP-600 to restore, this might be worth consideration. Thanks again, Dan.