eBay sighting: Eton E1

E1

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Chris Freitas, who writes:

I came across this find on eBay. I was tempted to buy one myself, but I am content with the PL-680 I have right now. However, some SWLing Post readers may want to check it out:

Click here to view on eBay.

Thanks for the tip, Chris! It appears this seller has a long and very positive history–certainly a plus on eBay!

Memories and transistor radios

Magnovox 1R 1203Many thanks to SWLing Post contributors, Ron and Aaron, who shared a link to Jay Allen’s latest post–an update on his pocket AM/FM radios.

Like Jay, I’ve always had an affinity for pocket transistor radios.

The Realistic Model 23-464.

The Realistic Model 23-464.

My first one was an AM-only model: a Realistic Model 23-464. It was about the only new pocket radio I could afford–and purchase locally–when I was a kid.

It was surprisingly sensitive on the AM broadcast band, but the dial was a far cry from accurate. At some point, I either gave this radio to someone or lost it. Last year, I happened upon one on eBay and purchased it for $9 shipped. Its plastic body shows signs of wear, but it works and reminds me of my childhood.

My grandpa's Magnovox 1R 1203

My grandpa’s Magnovox 1R 1203

Another pocket AM/FM radio that brings back a flood of memories is the Magnovox 1R 1203. It belonged to my dear grandpa, who also shared and conveyed a love of radio. When I was a kid, we would sit around on his front porch on hot summer days and listen to local AM stations on this little radio, cicadas whirring in the background.

I still have his Magnavox–it sits here in my radio room and brings back memories every time I look at or listen to it.

Am I a nostalgic fellow? You bet!

Anyone else have memories associated with pocket radios? Please feel free to comment and share!

Mario snags a Memorex TrackTec Scannocular!

Photo source: Universal Radio

Photo source: Universal Radio

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi (N2HUN), who recently wrote an article for the excellent Radio World magazine. His topic?  The Memorex TrackTec Scannocular! Mario writes:

Ever heard of a Scannocular?  Universal Radio used to sell ’em, they were for race fans, basically a scanner with surgically attached binoculars:

http://www.radioworld.com/article/whats-black-and-red-and-hears-all-over/279408

“I’ve always had a penchant for the weird, the off-beat, the non-mainstream. In high school I felt most at home with fellows who were ostracized by the general student populus, who acted and thought differently, had the intestinal fortitude to walk the road less traveled and were genuinely interesting individuals.

The same affinity goes for electronic devices; the weird stuff interests me. That’s why I recently acquired a Memorex Scannocular from an eBay auction.”[…]

Continue reading at Radio World…

Mario, I must say that I had never heard of the Scannocular–what an intriguing piece of kit! It sounds like a decent performer (especially for $26!). I’m surprised it actually has a proper BNC connector for an external antenna.

I just searched eBay, but had no luck finding a set of Scannoculars. Perhaps there’s been an increase in popularity–other members of the “bohemian brigade” who decided the Scannocular is the only item they’ll need to stand out among other race fans!

I always enjoy your articles and reviews, Mario! Thanks for sharing!

mySdrPlayback: new version adds a DGPS decoder

mySdrRecordingWaterfall

Many thanks to Chris Smolinski, at Black Cat Systems, who recently announced new mySdrPlayback features:

I’ve released a new beta of mySdrPlayback, which is a Mac app that lets you easily go through SDR recording files. It works with recording files produced by SdrDx and SpectraVue, as well as Perseus.

This version adds a DGPS decoder that decodes from every DGPS channel in parallel, looking for messages. Makes it super easy to DX DGPS stations, just record overnight, then run the recordings through the app in the morning, and you get a list of all of the decoded messages from the various stations.

Click here to view the information and download page at Black Cat Systems.

Brazilian DX heard in Oxford UK, with venerable Sony ICF-2001D

Hi there, I thought I would share some Brazilian shortwave catches with you, obtained using my Sony ICF-2001D receiver and 200 metre experimental longwire. The first is Radio Bandeirantes, Sao Paolo on 9645.4 kHz. This is a station that I’ve only heard once or twice previously, but was received with excellent signal clarity and strength recently, using my deployable longwire antenna. I would rate this station as moderately difficult to receive with reasonable discernibility. The second is Radio Novo Tempo from Campo Grande, on 4894.9 kHz. This station I would rate as difficult to hear with discernible audio. The key is always signal-to-noise, thus moving yourself out of the ubiquitous blanket of QRM most modern environments endure will usually achieve this and of course coupled with sufficient space outdoors to erect a larger antenna will hopefully also improve signal strength. My final video on this post is Radio Nacional Brazilia on 6180 kHz. I would regard this station as quite easy to hear well; their effective TX power towards Europe is around 2 MW, however, outdoors, this station can literally boom in, with what might be perceived as local-AM signal strength. I hope you enjoy watching the videos and seeing/ hearing what’s possible with a modest set-up. As for the Sony ICF-2001D? Well the design is more than 30 years old, but in my opinion at least, still one of the very best portable shortwave receivers ever manufactured. Thanks and 73.

 

Direct link to Oxford Shortwave Log for reception video of Radio Bandeirantes

 

Direct link to Oxford Shortwave Log for reception video of Radio Novo Tempo

 

Direct link to Oxford Shortwave Log for reception video of Radio Nacional Brazilia

 

Clint Gouveia is the author of this post and a regular contributor to the SWLing Post. Clint actively publishes videos of his shortwave radio excursions on his YouTube channel: Oxford Shortwave Log. Clint is based in Oxfordshire, England.