Category Archives: Apps

KiwiSDR network updates include native HF FAX

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mark Fahey, who writes:

Lots happening with KiwiSDR – there are now over 130 live 0-30MHz fully controllable SDRs scatted around the world some in really interesting locations. Using Kiwi’s around the world is like being able to go on a exotic DXpedition any time.

Here (attached graphic) is a map of the current locations, you can see the live status of online receivers here:

http://rx.linkfanel.net

and as a list of receivers here:

http://kiwisdr.com/public/

KiwiSDRs now include HF Fax reception natively, just select Fax in the Extension menu, select the part of the world you are interested in and the Kiwi will tune the weather fax frequency and receive the weather fax all natively (no extra software needed) – too easy!

Lots more great things happening.

Here is the latest news…

http://www.kiwisdr.com/#id-31-may-17

Cheers,
Mark

Thank you for the update, Mark! I had no idea the KiwiSDR app had an HF Fax extension. After reading your message, I loaded a KiwiSDR session in Europe and used the Fax feature. It couldn’t have been easier. The screen grab (above) came from my first attempt.

The KiwiSDR network is truly amazing. I use it all the time–especially if there’s an important broadcast happening and I can’t easily receive it at home or while traveling. As an example, during the recent French elections, I listened to results roll in on France Inter mediumwave from a KiwiSDR in Italy. It felt like being there.

My one feature request would be that the KiwiSDR app include some form of native broadcast recording like the WebSDR at U Twente.

Many thanks for the update, Mark!

Click here to read about Mark’s KiwiSDR installation.

Would you like to host your own KiwiSDR?

The whole system only costs $299 US. The KiwiSDR site has a list of distributors around the world.

Amazon has units in stock at $299 US shipped.

I would have purchased a KiwiSDR ages ago–during their Kickstarter campaign–if I only had the Internet bandwidth at home to support it. My Internet speeds are likely lower than anyone else here in the SWLing Post community. One of the compromises living in a relatively remote spot with no RFI. 🙂

What are your favorite radio apps?

As I mentioned in a previous post, I’ve been browsing the Google Play store this morning in search of an Android app that would help one of our readers decode HF digital modes.

I suggested Tivar, which is essentially FLdigi for Android devices. The app was originally created by Dave (W1HKJ) and published on Google Play by Stephen Cooper. According to the description, the app does not have a dedicated developer, but based on reviews, it seems to work for many.

I assume this is the best (or only?) app for decoding broadcasts like the VOA Radiogram, DigiDX, etc?

Searching Google Play–and noticing a number of new apps–made me realize that it’s been a while since I’ve done a proper updated of my list of Android, iOS and Windows apps for radio enthusiasts.

What’s in your phone or tablet?

Post readers: I could use your help…

If you have a moment, please browse my list of apps and comment (on this post) with suggestions of any that you love, but I haven’t recommended.

I’ll check out each app and update the list accordingly over the next few weeks.

It would be very helpful if you note what you like about the app and if it’s available on multiple platforms (iOS, Android and/or Windows). I imagine there are many I’ve yet to check out!

Thank you in advance!

Interval Signal Ringtones for Android

This morning, while browsing for an Android app, I noticed that SWLing Post contributor, Stephen Cooper, has published a simple app for adding interval signal ringtones to your Android device.

Interval Signal Ringtones appears to have a very simple interface and over 40 interval signals included. The price is very modest at $1.98.

Click here to view in the Google Play store.

Updates to the Morse Pad app

Many thanks to Chris Smolinski, who shares the following update:

I have a new version of Morse Pad for the iPad/iPhone/iPod Touch.

This update includes an improved decoder which better handles improper dot / dash / space timing by the sender (poor fist), automatic speed (WPM) algorithm, and adds AFC (Automatic Frequency Control), which auto tunes in the strongest signal present.

App Store Link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/morse-pad/id385629886?mt=8

Nicholas uses Android phone and $18 receiver to decode VOA Radiogram

voa-radiogram-decode-app

Many thanks to Nicholas Pospishil, who shares this photo and notes:

“VOA Radiogram on 5745 kHz. No fancy equipment needed.”

No kidding! Mobile phones and tablets now have more than enough horsepower to decode most VOA Radiograms.

Nicholas uses the free AndFlmsg app for Android to decode. Note that AndFlmsg is not available in the Google Play store, you must manually install it using these directions.

The Kaito WRX911 is an $18 US receiver and AndFlmsg is free. That’s a pretty inexpensive and accessible combo!

Nicholas originally posted this image on Gary J. Cohen’s Shortwave Listeners Global.

Thanks for sharing, Nicholas!