Category Archives: Art

“Shortwave” – A shortwave-centric suspense film

shortwave-film-poster

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Richard Cuff, who notes the following recently-released suspense film:

‘Shortwave’ Attracts Something Sinister (Exclusive)

Funny that shortwave is being used as a medium for “something sinister.”  I do recall the film, Frequency, where extraordinary propagation helped a father and son communicate through time via shortwave.

I suppose, however, another recent film that brought the underground side of shortwave radio in the light was The Numbers Station with John Cusack and Malin Ackerman.

Any other shortwave-centric films I’m missing?

Spectres of Shortwave: Help Amanda put the finishing touches on her film

Curtain antennas in operation at RCI Sackville

Curtain antennas in operation at RCI Sackville

Many thanks to SWLing Post reader, Jason, who shares the following:

Not sure if you’ve seen this Indiegogo campaign to help finish a doc on the RCI transmitter site…I think I may have first heard about this from your blog?

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/spectres-of-shortwave-last-steps#/

Thanks, Jason! Yes, you might have heard about Spectres of Shortwave here as I’ve been posting updates on the SWLing Post since 2013!  I’m very happy to see the film nearing completion. Since my wife has worked in film production, I’m well aware of the enormous amount of time and effort it takes to produce a documentary on a shoestring budget.

I just sent support to Amanda through Indigogo. Click here if you’d like to support her, too.

Amanda is also posting preview clips on her Indigogo page–here’s a teaser she posted yesterday:

Edward R. Murrow Shortwave Transmitting Station: wallpaper images

VOA-site-B-Wallpaper-MainBuilding2

On April 1st, I spent the bulk of the day at the Edward R. Murrow Transmitting Station outside of Greenville, North Carolina. Prior to my visit, I asked if SWLing Post readers had any requests or questions I could address while there.

I printed all of your inquiries and made sure they were addressed during my visit. I also took a lot of photos!

I had hoped to have a post published the following week with all of the photos and responses properly curated, but frankly, I haven’t had the spare time to do it yet. I’ve simply had too much travel and too many projects on my plate since that site visit (not to mention cramming for the Extra exam!).

I’m working on a draft of the post now and Macon Dail (WB4PMQ), the transmitting station’s Chief Engineer, is helping me with captions and responding to your questions.

Wallpaper

One reader asked if I could snap some photos that could be used as wallpaper on his computer. This morning, I selected eleven images and cropped them to fit a widescreen monitor.

I tried to pick images that would work well as a background/wallpaper–meaning, they’re not too busy (visually). Some are abstract close-ups.

Click on any of the images on this page to enlarge–then simply save the image to your computer to use it as you see fit.

I hope you enjoy!

VOA-site-B-Wallpaper-MainBuilding VOA-site-B-Wallpaper-HighVoltage VOA-site-B-Wallpaper-Curtain-Closeup VOA-site-B-Wallpaper-Curtain-Antenna VOA-site-B-Wallpaper-Continental-Transmitter VOA-site-B-Wallpaper-BluePrints VOA-site-B-Wallpaper-AntennaFarm VOA-site-B-Wallpaper-Antenna VOA-site-B-Wallpaper-1 VOA-site-B-Wallpaper-TX-Mimic-Panel

Paul’s rare and classic shortwave QSL cards

QSL collage

A couple months ago at my local ham radio club meeting (the NCDXCC), my buddy Paul Greaves (W4FC) mentioned that his passion for amateur radio DXing originated with shortwave broadcaster DXing. He told me:

“When I was a teen I could hardly wait to check the PO Box to see what treasures were awaiting me. After getting a QSL card many times there were many more mailings with program schedules and propaganda. I even got Chairman Mao’s little Red Book.”

Paul noted that he had quite a few SWL QSL cards, so naturally I asked if he’d share a few of his favorites with the SWLing Post. He kindly obliged.

Click on the images below to enlarge.


ABCRadioFront-001

ABCRadioBack-001


GhanaBroadcastingCorpOpenFront-001 GhanaBroadcastingCorpFront-001GhanaBroadcastingCorpBack-001


Radio4VEHFront-001 Radio4VEHBack-001


RadioAustriaFront-001 RadioAustriaBack-001


RadioBelizeFront-001RadioBelizeBack-001


RadioBerlinInternationalFront-001RadioBerlinInternationalBack-001


RadioBucharestFront-001 RadioBucharestBack-001


RadioBudapestFront-001RadioBudapestBack-001


RadioCairoFront-001 RadioCairoBack-001


RadioDenmarkFront-001 RadioDenmarkBack-001


RadioFinlandFront-001RadioFinlandBack-001


RadioKievFront-001 RadioKievBack-001


RadioNacionalDeEspanaFront-001 RadioNacionalDeEspanaBack-001


RadioSofiaFront-001 RadioSofiaBack-001


RadioSwedenFront-001 RadioSwedenBack-001


RadioTiranaFront-001 RadioTiranaBack-001


RadioVoiceOfTheGospelFront-001 RadioVoiceOfTheGospelBack-001


USStationBalboaFront-001 USStationBalboaBack-001


VaticanRadioFront-001 VaticanRadioBack-001


VoiceOfNigeriaFront-001 VoiceOfNigeriaBack-001


WWVHFront-001 WWVHBack-001


Wow–thank you so much for sharing these, Paul! What a beautiful QSL collection!

Post readers: If you also have some classic SWL QSL cards you’d like to share here on the SWLing Post, please contact me!

Radio 4 Doc: Learning to Listen

Atwater-Kent-DialLooking back through my notes this morning, I re-discovered this excellent documentary on the early days of radio listening; how radio changed the way we interacted with music and how we interacted with our radios.

(Source: BBC Radio 4)

As broadcasting took the world by storm in the 1920s, the radio quickly became the hub of many households. Entire families would huddle around their receiver, each person individually connected with their own headset.

But for this first generation of radio listeners, the flexible styles of listening that we habitually employ today were by no means innate – many sat silent and fully attentive, listening just as they would in a concert hall.

Historian Dominic Sandbrook charts how a new, more informal style of listening gradually evolved through the 1920s and 30s, by delving into the diaries of the Austrian musician Heinrich Schenker.

Schenker began to record what he heard on the radio within days of the inaugural broadcast from Austria’s first official station, Radio Wien. This rare and fascinating record, which spans just over a decade, offers tangible evidence of how new approaches to listening emerged over these formative years. We’ll follow Schenker’s journey as the radio shifts from being something that demanded his rapt attention, to eventually becoming an integrated part of his domestic life.

Click here to listen to the full documentary on Radio 4.