Category Archives: Nostalgia

Shortwave Radio Recordings: Radio Baghdad, August 8, 1990

radio baghdad qsl

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Al Quaglieri, who shares the following recording, QSL (above) and notes:

Here’s a nice recording I made of the first 13 minutes of Radio Baghdad’s English broadcast one day around August 8, 1990. It begins with some music and then there’s a newscast. For a couple of months, I sent such recordings down the phone line to CBS News in New York, who were eager to hear them. This, alas, is the only one I kept. Hard to believe it was nearly 26 years ago.

My how that does bring back memories! Thank you for sharing this excellent recording, Al!

Reminder: From The Radio Netherlands Archives Part 2

pcj(Source: PCJ Press Release)

August 21st and 22nd PCJ Radio International will present part 2 of From The Radio Netherlands Archives.

In the first program we played a mix bag of stuff. But in program two the focus will be on news and documentaries. You will hear Ginger Da Silva, Eric Beauchemin, Pete Myers and more.

There will be a special E-QSL issued for this program. PCJ Radio International’s partner stations will receive this program in two parts.

The program will be presented by Paulette MacQuarrie.

Europe: 0600 to 0800UTC – Frequency 7780kHz
August 21, 2016

North America: 0100 to 0300UTC – Frequency 7570kHz
August 22, 2016

For more information contact PCJ at pcj@pcjmedia.com

RFE and the 1956 Hungarian Revolution (Part 2)

HalliDial

Many thanks to Richard Cummings of the website, Cold War Radio Vignettes, who writes:

[F]or your weekend reading pleasure, Part Two, in which I briefly examine the background to and excerpts from the RFE controversial broadcasts:

https://coldwarradios.blogspot.de/2016/08/radio-free-europe-and-1956-hungarian_5.html

Many thanks for sharing, Richard!

August 21 & 22: From The Radio Netherlands Archives Part 2

pcj(Source: PCJ Press Release)

August 21st and 22nd PCJ Radio International will present part 2 of From The Radio Netherlands Archives.

In the first program we played a mix bag of stuff. But in program two the focus will be on news and documentaries. You will hear Ginger Da Silva, Eric Beauchemin, Pete Myers and more.

There will be a special E-QSL issued for this program. PCJ Radio International’s partner stations will receive this program in two parts.

The program will be presented by Paulette MacQuarrie.

Europe: 0600 to 0800UTC – Frequency 7570kHz
August 21, 2016

North America: 0100 to 0300UTC – Frequency 7780kHz
August 22, 2016

For more information contact PCJ at pcj@pcjmedia.com

Cold War Radio: The BBC’s plans in the event of nuclear war

BBC-AT-WAR

Many thanks to SWLing Post reader, William Lee, who shares this item from the BBC:

(Source: BBC News)

For the first time, the BBC has given detailed access to the plans it drew up in the Cold War for a Wartime Broadcasting System to operate in the event of nuclear war. Paul Reynolds, a former BBC diplomatic and foreign correspondent, has been studying the secrets of what was known as the “War Book”.

The War Book reveals a world of meticulous BBC planning. The Wartime Broadcasting System (WTBS) – referred to in the book as “Deferred Facilities” – would have operated from 11 protected bunkers spread across the UK.

Known as “Regional Seats of Government”, these would also have sheltered government ministers and staff from government departments during what is termed a “nuclear exchange”. The BBC had a studio in each, usually with five staff drawn mostly from nearby local radio stations.

The BBC’s headquarters would have been a bunker at the Engineering Training Department at Wood Norton in Worcestershire, where 90 BBC staff would have been assembled, including engineers, announcers, 12 news editors and sub-editors and ominously “two nominations from Religious Broadcasting”. Output would have been controlled by the government.

To keep the public amused during Armageddon, a collection of cassette tapes of old radio programmes including the Goon Show, Just a Minute and Round the Horne, was kept in a grey locker at Wood Norton. It was eventually realised, however, that these were redundant. If there had been a nuclear attack, radios would probably have been dependent on batteries and these would have needed to be conserved for news and important announcements.[…]

[Continue reading…]

Oh how I would love to read a copy of the “War Book”–! I hope, at some point, the BBC adds it to their online archives. Last year, we published a post with the actual statement the BBC would have broadcast in the event of a nuclear exchange. Click here to read the post.