Pirate Radio Recordings: Radio Casablanca

Poster - Casablanca_13

Last night at about 00:10 UTC, I was pleased to hear the interval signal of one of my favorite pirate radio stations: Radio Casablanca.

“Rick Blaine” fired up his AM transmitter and pumped out some amazing WWII era music on 6,940 kHz for about one hour and a half. Radio Casablanca only pops up a few times a year, so I always feel fortunate to grab the broadcast (click here to listen to previous recordings).

Signal strength varied over the course of the broadcast and the bands were quite noisy–still, the Casablanca signal punched through quite well at times.

Close your eyes and imagine what it must have been like to hear the great bands of the era over the shortwaves…

Click here to download an MP3 of the full recording, or simply listen via the embedded player below. Note that the interval signal starts around 01:25:

Madagascar World Voice now broadcasting on shortwave

Madagascar-World-Voice

(Source: Radio World)

World Christian Broadcasting launched its second shortwave station, Madagascar World Voice, on Easter Sunday in late March.

The nonprofit organization is based near Nashville, Tenn. Station KNLS launched in 1983. 

President/CEO Charles H. Caudill announced the launch. “More than 10 years of planning and work have gone into making Madagascar World Voice a reality,” he said in a statement.

[…]WCB said the new Madagascar World Voice airs 13 hours daily in Arabic, African English, International English, Mandarin Chinese, Russian and Spanish. The signals will reach Africa and the Middle East, and most of Europe and South America.[…]

Read the full article at Radio World online.

Many thanks to SWLing Post reader, Mike H, who shares the following Summer A-16 schedule for Madagascar World Voice:

MADAGASCAR   Summer A-16 of WWCB Madagascar World Voice
0100-0200 on  9665 MWV 100 kW / 040 deg to SoAs English
0200-0300 on  6190 MWV 100 kW / 250 deg to SoAm Spanish
0300-0400 on  6150 MWV 100 kW / 265 deg to SoAm Spanish
0400-0500 on  9480 MWV 100 kW / 295 deg to CeAf English
1800-1900 on  9570 MWV 100 kW / 355 deg to EaEu Russian
1800-1900 on 17640 MWV 100 kW / 310 deg to CeAf English
1900-2000 on 11945 MWV 100 kW / 355 deg to N/ME Arabic
1900-2000 on 13710 MWV 100 kW / 340 deg to EaAf Arabic
2100-2200 on 11615 MWV 100 kW / 325 deg to WeEu Chinese
2200-2300 on  9455 MWV 100 kW / 055 deg to EaAs Chinese
2200-2300 on 11770 MWV 100 kW / 325 deg to NoAf Arabic

Radio Guinée back on shortwave

RadioGuinee

Check out this news by Sheldon Harvey of The International Radio Report:

As reported by many DXers worldwide, Radio Guinée, from the Republic of Guinea in west Africa has returned to shortwave on 9650 kHz. Check between 0000 and 0300 UTC as well as around 0600 UTC. Programming is in French with lots of African music. Here is an article from March about the state of radio and TV transmitters in the Republic of Guinea. Perhaps this is what spurred them to reactivate the shortwave transmission. The article is in French.

Click here to read the article in French.

Click here for an English version through Google Translate.

Thanks for the heads-up, Sheldon! I start listening for Radio Guinée again.

Nothing to hear on shortwave? Jacques disagrees…

MauritiusIsland-IndianOcean-SM

Many thanks to SWLing Post reader, Jacques Catherine, who left the following comment on our post from 2012: Is there anything to listen to on shortwave?

“I live in Mauritius Island in the Indian Ocean and I’ve been listening to Shortwave since I was a kid (I’m 58 today) on my dad’s good old Phillips wooden valve radio.

I’m sorry, but shortwave is certainly not dead. After having read all the comments above, I come to the conclusion that reception definitely depends on your location.

The Tecsun PL-660.

The Tecsun PL-660.

I have two Tecsun receivers ( Tecsun S 2000 and PL 660) hooked to a Windom antenna and an ATU. I receive dozens of stations from all over the world here as well as a lot of stuff on ssb, including – in the morning – New York MWARA (8825.0 usb), Gander (8831.0 usb) or, in the evening, Brisbane (5634.0 usb).

Broadcast stations from Japan, Taiwan, India, Iran, Australia, Singapore, China, Africa and even the US, come in here loud and clear with very little static, depending on the season and time of the day. I think I’m privileged to be located where I am !

And I bought some years back a pair of cheap small wooden amplified speakers in Hong Kong that reproduce exactly the sound of my dad’s old valve radio!”

Thank you for your comment, Jacques. You’re right: it’s all about your location…and you certainly live in a prime spot!

I’m most fortunate that I live where I do–quite far away from sources of noise that plague our urban readers/listeners (and that have plagued me in the past). My location is not ideal (from a radio/receiving standpoint) because my ground conductivity is very poor and I’m in North America where very few broadcasts are targeted these days. I do, however, have the space for a rather large horizontal delta loop antenna that serves me well across the HF bands. I might have invested $50 in the antenna wire and components five years ago.

When propagation is good, some broadcast bands are actually packed tightly with signals. Indeed, Thursday last week, I could’ve easily logged two dozen stations on the 31 meter band alone.  Here’s a screen capture from the spectrum display of my SDR:

TitanSDRPro-Spectrum-31MB

If you live in an urban area and feel that you’re missing out on the action, consider taking your receiver outdoors and away from interference. Take your receiver on hikes, camping trips or to the beach. You might be surprised by the number of stations you’ll log!

Recently, our friend London Shortwave has been posting an amazing array of broadcast recordings he’s made in a park in the middle of London, England. He’s the guru of mitigating urban interference.

When I have time to curate the recordings, I hope to do a 2016 update of “Is there anything to listen to on shortwave?“–it’s been on my to-do list for a while now.

Jacques, thanks again for your comment and reminding us to keep listening!

RCI programming returns to shortwave via Shortwaveservice.com

SX-99-Dial-Nar

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Richard Langley, who writes:

Radio700Here is the response from Christian Milling, the director of Radio 700 and Shortwaveservice. Note that he is stressing the difference between Radio 700 (as a program and separate broadcasting station) and Shortwaveservice (as the provider of technical services for the shortwave transmitters at the Kall-Krekkel). The transmitters are actually maintained by Burkhard Baumgartner, DF5XV, under the name “Classic Broadcast”.

All three operations are closely linked so it’s understandable that there is confusion about who does what. Furthermore, in the WRTH, we have “Radio 700 Kurzwellendienst” (Radio 700 Shortwave Service). No reply directly from RCI yet.

Dear Richard Langley,

thank you very much for your e-Mail. Indeed we (not Radio700 but Shortwaveservice.com as technical provider) has set up an official cooperation with Radio Canada International which allows us to transmit the english, french and spanish programming. So this will be a long-term relay on a legal basis. As we prepare a spanish language outlet, the spanish broadcast of RCI will follow later on on SW.

The propagation conditions are a bit lousy at the moment, resulting in a bigger skipzone since a few days on 7310 kHz. Normally we boom into on that frequency also in Twente (which is approx. 200km away from our tranmitter [sic] site). We got some reception reports from the UK, which one from Manchester I’d like to quote: “Good clear signal, just some slight fading from solar disturbance that was taking place. How wonderful to hear Radio Canada International back on shortwave again, I really hope they continue broadcasting from Kall, I couldn’t believe it when I saw they would be broadcasting here this week.”

As the brodcasts [sic] are intended for the reception in europe and most speak either french or english and our weekend-schedule is very crowded, we only managed to find a slot for both languages at a time. But we will think about a re-run of the shows on a different day.

Thanks for tuning in!

If you have any further questions, don’t hesitate to contact me.

Best regards,
Christian Milling

Thanks so much for the update, Richard!

Update: From the Isle of Music

April11112promo copy copy

Many thanks to SWLing Post reader, Bill Tilford, who shares this From The Isle of Music update:

Since the addition of Channel 292 we are now getting excellent reception reports from as far east as Moscow.

Our April 11 (in the Americas) / April 12 (for the rest of the world) program will have more dance music than usual, with special guests Jesus Chappottin and Miguelito Cuni Jr. of Conjunto Chappotin, some classic dance tracks from Conjunto Los Bocucos and some Timba from El Niño y la Verdad. On the Jazz front, a new release by Brenda Navarrete, and more beautiful Cuban concert music from the album Danzas Para Piano de Ignacio Cervantes.

Two listening options on shortwave:

  • WBCQ, 7490 KHz, Tuesdays 0000 UTC (8pm EDT Mondays)
  • Channel 292, 6070 KHz, Tuesdays 1900 UTC (2100 CEST)

See the NOTES section of our Facebook page for program updates and other information.

Update: From the Isle of Music

IsleOfMusic

Many thanks to SWLing Post reader, Bill Tilford, who shares this From The Isle of Music update:

From the Isle of Music can now be heard Tuesdays from 1900-2000 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz, a station in Germany, in addition to Tuesdays 0000 UTC (8-9pm EDT Mondays in the Americas) on WBCQ 7490, a station in the US

We are now able to send e-Qsls for reception reports for both options, we can be sent to tilfordproductions@gmail.com. Please be patient with us about response time as our resources are very limited.

Our April 4 (in the Americas) / April 5 (for the rest of the world) program will include Cuban Jazz trombonist Eduardo Sandoval, one of the most exciting trombonists in Cuba since Juan Pablo Torres. We will also begin a beautiful new concert music album, Danzas Para Piano de Ignacio Cervantes, and we’ll have some Cuban rock from Tesis de Menta along with some of Pello el Afrokan’s Mozambiques.

Two listening options on shortwave:

  • WBCQ, 7490 KHz, Tuesdays 0000 UTC (8pm EDT Mondays)
  • Channel 292, 6070 KHz, Tuesdays 1900 UTC (2100 CEST)

See our Facebook page for more information.