Mark’s rekindled interest in shortwave radio

Sony-ICF-2001D

Many thanks to SWLing Post reader, Mark Lane, who writes:

Hi Thomas,

I just wanted to thank you for a great website, I have been interested in SW since I was a boy and used to listen to my grandfather’s world radio. I cannot remember the make or model now but it was an amazing experience.

After all these years, at the age of 44, my interest perked again and I happened across your site.

Like a lot of people I was wondering “is there anything left to listen to on SW now we are truly in the ‘digital’ age”? After reading the content on your site and the blog I made up my mind, jumped onto eBay and after a number of failed attempts at winning any auctions I managed to bag a near mint Sony ICF 2001D [photo at top of page]!

I did get rather over excited and probably paid a bit too much for it, but too be honest I don’t care. I have already had a good couple of evenings trying to bag some far off stations and I am still trying to figure out all the buttons on the thing.

Then this past weekend, my daughter (15) asked about the radio and I showed her what I had been doing–she was hooked and kept asking me to try for some more stations. We spent the whole evening with the help of a couple of other websites trying to track down more distant stuff.

I have to say the 2001D is now my prize possession and my daughter was messaging her friends telling them all about the wonders of SW.

All I can say is keep up the good work and let’s hope SW does continue for as long as possible I will certainly be listening in until the airwaves go quiet, I trust that won’t happen for some considerable time.

Regards
Mark Lane
Worcester UK

Mark: thank you so much for sharing your message! It’s an honor to know that the SWLing Post played some part in your renewed interest in shortwave radio. The community here is simply amazing and I learn a lot myself from so many reader contributions.

Being a father of two daughters, I can say that there’s no better feeling than to know that a little radio listening time also translated into quality father and daughter time!

You just made my day!

Christopher seeks title of shortwave broadcaster’s book

HalliDial

SWLing Post reader, Christopher Brennen, writes:

I’m wondering if you or the wider community can help?

I remember a few years ago (at least 16 or 17) receiving a book about a SW religious station. I’m not sure, but the title “Towers of Power” or similar comes to mind.

I thought it was from or about Family Radio, so I contacted them to inquire. They kindly replied and noted that they knew of no such book.

I’ve looked everywhere for another copy, but without knowing the exact title, the author or which broadcaster it concerned, I have no idea where to look. I am certain I am not imagining it! Could you or anyone help me to track this book down?

Regards,
Christopher Brennen

Thanks for your message, Christopher.  Unfortunately, I’m not familiar with a book that matches your description.

Post Readers: If you can help Christopher track down this book, please comment on this post.

Alan seeks help modifying the NewLog logging application

NewLog Entry Screen

SWLing Post reader, Alan Lever, writes:

“Although not new, NewLog is excellent for all breeds of radio listener.

It has separate opening screens for Amateur, SWL, Broadcast etc. all fully adaptable as to layout, renaming boxes etc.

The developer, Tom Lackamp (AB9B), gives full permission to alter and further develop it. I’ve had no success contacting him.

To make this program perfect, can anyone tell me how to set up drop boxes in the various set boxes. I have no idea how to do this myself so would appreciate any help, please.

Readers: Please comment if you can help Alan modify NewLog or if you have current contact information for the developer, Tom Lackamp (AB9B). Thanks!

Recordings: Paul records Vanuatu and Solomon Islands from central Alaska

IMG_0866

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Paul Walker, who shares the following recordings of Radio Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands Broadcasting. Paul lives in Galena, Alaska, and records most of these broadcasts outside of his broadcasting studio:

7260 kHz:

5020 kHz:

5020 kHz:

3945 is much weaker then 7260 for some reason and Nikkei is on that channel till 0900 UTC, so about the only chance I have of hearing Vanuatu on 3945 CLEARLY is when Nikkei signs off.

9545 kHz Monday Night 1130 AKDT/(0730 utc Tuesday)

7260 from April 19th at 1135 AKDT /0735 UTC)

5020 from April 20th at 1248 am AKDT/0848 UTC

Thanks for sharing your recordings, Paul! You’ve certainly done a fine job DXing in the northern latitudes all while standing next to a broadcast station.

Keep up the great work!

Daniel’s Radio Havana Cuba QSL card from August 15, 2015

Radio-Havana-Cuba-QSL-Front

Front of RHC QSL card (click to enlarge).

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Daniel Amoroso, who shares this QSL card and notes:

Hello Thomas, 

Attached is QSL # 1 from Radio Habana Cuba for their shortwave broadcast on 8- 15-2015

This was the day the US Embassy in Cuba was officially re-opened.

Back of RHC QSL card (click to enlarge).

Back of RHC QSL card (click to enlarge).

Card was received on April 18 , 2016.

Very cool!  Thank you for sharing this card and noting that relevant bit of history, Daniel.

Curating a list of endangered shortwave stations

RCI-Sackville-2012

That’s my minivan parked in front of the RCI Sackville transmitting station in June, 2012. The site was closed by the end of 2012 and towers demolished shortly thereafter.

Recently, my friend and fellow archivist, London Shortwave, and I engaged in a discussion about creating a curated list of “endangered” shortwave radio stations.

The idea being we could use such a list to focus our efforts and those of the archiving community on recording broadcasters that were most likely to disappear in the near future.

London Shortwave published an excellent post about this on his blog.

Please click here to read his post.

We quickly put this page on the Shortwave Radio Audio Archive as a starting point.

We need your help to curate this list!

Please comment either on London Shortwave’s blog, or on this post, and suggest any additional broadcasters we may have missed. Please include a link to news item(s) which may indicate the broadcaster faces closure.

Of course, this list and the categories are subjective–we’re simply using our best judgement in this process. Often, broadcasters can shut down with little or no notice.

Thanks in advance for your help!

World’s first pirate broadcast on Easter 1916 to be celebrated

Antique-Radio-Audion(Source: Silicon Republic via Andrea Borgnino)

At an event in Trinity College Dublin (TCD) tonight (25 April), the centenary of the broadcasting of the Proclamation of an Irish Republic via shortwave radio in 1916 – considered by many to be the first pirate radio broadcast – will be marked.

While the men and women who took part in Easter 1916 were camped out in the GPO and other locations around Dublin, one group involved with the rebellion, led by Joseph Mary Plunkett, wanted to use the latest technology to spread the message of Irish revolt.

Having commandeered the Irish School of Wireless Telegraphy at the corner of O’Connell Street and Abbey Street – where the Grand Central Bar now sits – the group set up a ship’s wireless systems to broadcast a shortwave radio transmission, with the hope that a passing ship near the country would pick it up and report back to the US.

With Plunkett at the controls, the radio enthusiast issued a burst of Morse code that read: “Irish Republic declared in Dublin today. Irish troops have captured city and are in full possession. Enemy cannot move in city. The whole country rising.”

With some reports suggesting the broadcast was picked up as far away as Germany and Bulgaria, it is widely considered one of the first pirate radio broadcasts as, until then, point-to-point transmissions was the most common form of sending messages wirelessly.[…]

Continue reading the full article at Silicon Republic online…