Wembley Stadium: A Superb DXing location

Oxford-Shortwave

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Clint Gouveia, who writes:

As the designated driver, I found myself waiting for friends at the Beyonce concert at Wembley Stadium last Sunday [July 3rd], Not wishing to miss an opportunity and taking advantage of 8 stories of elevation (top floor of the car park!) I spent about 3 hours DXing with the legendary Panasonic RF-B65 and a Wellbrook ALA1530 active loop, running on my home-brew battery pack.

Rather counter-ituitively, I quickly discovered there was basically zero QRM and recorded wonderful signals from Zanzibar BC, Radio Bangladesh Betar and Radio Oromiya. Links to the reception videos on my youtube channel ‘Oxford Shortwave Log’ follow below. I thought readers of your excellent website/blog might be interested to learn that sometimes the most unlikely of places can provide just about optimum conditions for DX! There are more reception videos for this particular session to upload,including Radio Fana, Voice of Tigray Revolution and Radio CANDIP.

73!

Reception Videos

Video 1: Zanzibar BC 11735 kHz, best ever reception

Video 2: Bangladesh Betar 13580 kHz, wonderful reception

Video 3: Radio Oromiya 6030 kHz, Ethiopia, best reception to-date

Wow! What amazing reception, Clint!  I would have never guessed that a car park next to the largest stadium in the UK would offer up such excellent listening conditions. Honestly–that Bangladesh Betar broadcast sounds like a local station.

You also have a great receiver there in the Panasonic RF-B65. If memory serves, the RF-B65 is also a favorite of SWLing Post contributor/DXer, Dan Robinson.

Post readers: Follow Clint’s many DX catches on his YouTube channel: Oxford Shortwave Log.

Thanks again for sharing, Clint, and reminding us that DXing locations aren’t always remote and exotic.

Shortwave Logs from Alaska: June 25 – July 16

Alaska-Paul-Walker-Wellbrook

Conditions haven’t been so great lately and combine that with just being a bit tired and worn out means I haven’t DX’ed as much as I’d like. But I have spent a little time at the radio dials and when I do, I usually pull out a few good logs, so here we go:

3325 kHz, July 12 at 1025UTC. NBC Radio Bouganville with an absolutely LOUD, STELLAR signal. Audio was excellent and there was only light fading with no interference or noise. Survivor’s 1984 hit, “High On You” was playing during my recording. They seem to favor 80s and 90s rock or adult contemporary music when they play tunes. Audio of 3325kHz here:

5835 kHz AM (July 15, 1621UTC, 10871.70kHz USB (July 12 2049UTC) & 10861.90kHz USB(2052UTC). Russian Channel Marker. I’m not really sure where in Russia these come from or what their purpose is, as i am not very “up” on the utility type broadcasts on HF. The 5835 kHz beeping is pretty clear and evident, but it sounds like there’s a little interference coming from somewhere or someone else. The signal from the 10871kHz signals is pretty weak but the beeps do make it above the fading/noise,  5835kHz audio

here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEZMo5DziCI. 10871.70kHz usb audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIhn7MIHMR4 and 10871.90kHz USB audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQ9BeqosLtc

5857kHz, July 15 at 1626UTC. “HLL Seoul” with a weather broadcast by a woman speaking Korean. Poor to fair signal with some noise and interference. Audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBNmrdyDDI4

7260 kHz, July 12 at 1001UTC. Radio Vanuatu in their local language with talk in the local language, a little preaching and some Christian music. The audio quality isn’t too great (sounds like it’s full of digital artifacts) but the modulation level is better then usual.  Around 14 minutes and 35 seconds in, a female announcer comes on and talks for a bit then begins reading a sign off message then plays the Vanuatu national anthem. The carrier is left on for 10-15 minutes before being shut off. 7260 audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTnudTRmduk

7485 kHz, July 13 at 1636UTC. BBC Bengla service in Bengali language with a news broadcast. An absolutely stellar, steady signal with almost no noise whatsoever and no fading or interference. 7485kHz audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRDZKSDkSMk

7210 kHz & 9730 kHz, July 13 at 1628UTC and July 15 at 1643 UTC respectively. 7201 kHz is their broadcast in Vietnamese with 20kw via Daclac, Vietnam. Vietnamese music is heard at fair levels but with lots of noise and fading. Pretty decent considering what and where it is. As for 9730kHz, it’s The Voice of Vietnam in what appears to be the Russian language. A poor to fair signal with fading/noise and what appears to be interference from another station. 7210kHz audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xUpmAbpOW4 and 9730kHz audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2CE2QCgiD0

9515 kHz & 9640 kHz, July 11 1644UTC to 1652UTC. The 9515 signal is a bit stronger with slightly fess fading and noise. both are broadcasting the KBS World Radio english service with talk about travelers and tourists. 9515kHz audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0k77cY4DLA and 9640kHz audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhBxIPGHMh8

9526kHz, July 15 at 1645UTC. Voice of Indonesia with Arabic language speech and music. Fair to good signal with low modulation and some noise/fading but comparatively speaking, this is a VERY GOOD signal for what is usually heard on 9526 kHz! And yes, they are about as close to 9526 as can be. Zero beating them in USB with my PL880 produces a whine/noise till I’m right at 9526 kHz. One website, Eibi’s schedule says that are at 9525.9.. I suspect they may be even closer then that! 9526 kHz audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4WdKewnyWM

9665kHz, July 16 at 1715UTC. The Voice of Korea is heard here all day everyday but the audio is usually noisy and fairly poor(usually overmodulated) but this is a case of not only good audio but a pretty solid signal! 9665kHz audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMBLYV4icBQ

9770 kHz, July 11 at 1653UTC. KBS World Radio in Korean with men talking and a pretty steady, GOOD signal. Fair amount of noise and light fading. Audio of 9770kHz here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyXb3sg-1-o

9890 kHz, July 11 at 1729UTC. The Voice of Korea signing on in Arabic. Starts off as usual with a dead carrier, the interval signal and announcers mentioning the name of the signal. Noisy signal, but a much better signal then I’ve ever had from VoK on 9890kHz and the first time I’ve heard them here with log worthy audio! You can somewhat hear another station under them in this recording, and normally, that staion is usually on top VoK on this frequency. 9890 kHz audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ftVaztXipTg

10005 kHz, July 12 at 1705UTC and July 16 at 1718UTC. For the 2nd and 3rd time in 6 months, I’ve heard the Chinese Firedrake jammer on 10005 kHz. The first time several months ago, it was so strong it was interfering with WWV & WWVH. These last two times it was fairly weak but what made it even more interesting both times is I heard time pips underneath the jammer. If you listen closely in the two following clips, you can hear the tips and you can clearly hear a longer louder tone signifying the minute mark.  July 12th clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3X3iIs41PE. July 16th clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dClTJkpat30

11665 kHz, July 13 at 1647UTC. RTM Wai FM with an overall very good reception,  good audio and steady signal. Only a slight bit of fading. This is by far the best I’ve ever heard this frequency here! 11665kHz audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iw4oVv1hzOI

11735 kHz, July 11 at 2033UTC. Zanzibar Broadcasting Corporation with music and talk in Swahili. This is about the usual kind of signal I get from them, fair to the low side of good with some fading and noise. At times, there signal is even steadier, stronger and less noisy then this. They are listed as being on till 2100UTC but I’ve heard them sign off anywhere between about 2045 and 2058UTC in mid song with no announcement of any kind. In this nearly 19 minute recording, they sign off at 17 minutes and 33 seconds in. Some type of RTTY/data broadcast has recently appear in the last few months on 11735kHz causing interference, severe at times, with Zanzibar on 11735kHz. Audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZiG_nslSi0

12015 kHz, July 11 at 1703UTC & July 13 at 1652UTC. In the July 11th clip, you can hear CRI & VOK fighting it out together, with the two trading places back and forth. If either has a silent carrier, you can clearly here one of them. In the Jul 13th clip, Voice of Korea is on the frequency alone. 12015kHz audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OyKCnQ8DLCQ and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LF3PNWT69Fw

12035, July 12 at 0859UTC. The Voice of Mongolia. The signal is incredibly weak and this is a good catch if their beam is headed straight south from the transmitter site in Mongolia. Their interval signal pops up out of the noise a few times and you can hear a male announcer say the name of the station in Mongolia before the English language service begins at 0900UTC. Audio of 12035 kHz here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DH3ibgLLAg4

13605kHz, June 25h, 1058UTc. All India Radio with fair signal but lots of fading and noise, this is better then what I usually get from AIR. 13605 audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d03wQHXB-dA

13710kHz & 15435kHz, 1705UTC & 1705UTC. Radio Saudia/BSKSA. The 13710 signal was a bit better strength wise with chanting/Arabic music. The 15435 signal had men talking, like a news or interview program and was a bit weaker. 13710 audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0t3YP8RCZY8 and 15435 audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xr3tgnRBSn4

15235 kHz, July 14 1649UTC to 1710UTC. Channel Africa, first their news service in French followed by the English broadcast. Signal is good with some fading but very steady and listenable. 15235kHz audio here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtFZxeh468k and here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HD5lToK7Pdc

15275 kHz, July 16 at 1724UTC.  Deutsche Welle in French, a very noisy signal with lots of fading. Sounds like a news or interview program with a man and woman speaking. Any DW signal is pretty rare here! Audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lChqqJH2crc

17730 kHz, July 13 at 1658UTC. Eye Radio, broadcasting to South Sudan. A very very weak signal with tons of noise and fading. I can barely make out a man speaking before the carrier drops at 1700UTC, which is Eye Radio’s sign off time. Audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-CphVmuJSA

17740 kHz, July 16 at 1732UTC. Deutsche Welle in French with a signal even noisier and worse than 15275kHz. It very well may have been the same broadcast as what was on 15275kHz that I heard minutes earlier. Any DW signal is pretty rare here! Audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lChqqJH2crc

17775 kHz, July 13 at 1706UTC. KVOH which a preacher speaking in Spanish. Weak and noisy but steady signal. This may be the first time I’ve heard KVOH here and I consider this a good catch since they beam to Mexico and Central/South America. Audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqegTkffahA

17850 kHz, July 13 at 1702UTC. Radio France Internationale with a weak, noisy, fading signal. Women talking in French during a news broadcast. Audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujnbGMo8Tww

17850 kHz, June 25 at 1048UTc. Radio Thailand, they are a somewhat regular visitor but this is a bit better then usual signal. However, there is a lot of fading and noise. Audio of 17850 kHz here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XOuoZM00XmI

Paul Walker is an avid Shortwave DX’er located in Galena, Alaska working at “Community Radio For Alaska: KIYU” as Program Director and is a regular contributor to the SWLing Post. Be sure to check out Paul’s YouTube channel and SoundCloud channel where everything he logs is recorded and posted. Click here to read his other contributions on the SWLing Post.

From the Isle of Music for July 25/26

PromoFTIOMjuly252016small

The  July 26 (July 25 in the Americas on WBCQ) edition of From the Isle of Music includes more of María Felicia Pérez, director of Coro Exaudi, winner of the Choral Music category in Cubadisco 2016, and we will feature some Cuban Rock by Miel con Limón, winner of the Rock category in Cubadisco this year along with some new charanga by Orquesta Aragon, nominated in Traditional Popular Music this year. We will also play some Timba from the 1990s by Dan Den.

Two options for listening on shortwave:
WBCQ, 7490 KHz, Tuesdays 0000-0100 UTC
(8pm-9pm EDT Mondays in the Americas)
Channel 292, 6070 KHz, Tuesdays 1900-2000 UTC
(2100-2200 CEST)
See our Facebook page for more information. 

North Korean numbers station in the press

SWLingPost-Spy-Numbers-Station

I’ve been offline and off-grid this week and have accumulated quite the backlog of email.

One news item that caught the attention of a large number of readers (thanks to all for the tips–!) was North Korean spy numbers. I’m very curious if any readers have logged and recorded this station–if so, please comment and consider sharing your recording!

The news was featured on at least two prominent news sites:

(Source: The Guardian)

North Korea’s radio broadcast of string of mysterious numbers is possible code

Numbers read on state radio may be cold war-era method of sending coded messages to spies in South Korea – or an attempt to wage psychological warfare

North Korea’s state radio has recently broadcast strings of indecipherable numbers, according to officials in Seoul, in a possible resumption of a cold war-era method of sending coded messages to spies operating in South Korea.

A female announcer at the radio station read numbers for two minutes on 24 June and 14 minutes on Friday, according to Seoul’s unification ministry and national intelligence service (NIS). A copy of those comments provided by the ministry included phrases such as “No 35 on Page 459” and “No 55 on Page 913”.[…]

(Source: BBC)

North Korea is criticised by South Korea for ‘spy broadcasts’

South Korean officials have criticised North Korea after it apparently resurrected a Cold War-era method of contacting spies.

In recent weeks, mysterious strings of numbers have twice been broadcast over the radio from the North.

A spokesman for the South’s Unification Ministry said it couldn’t be sure about North Korea’s “hidden intentions”.

But it urged the North to “desist from such outdated practices”.[…]

The Eleventh HOPE Conference

HOPE-2016

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Ed, who writes:

You might consider reporting on The SWLing Post that there will be several talks at the The Eleventh HOPE conference this Fri/Sat/Sun that might interest your readers, including:

Tuning in to New York City’s Pirates of the Air

David Goren

Pirate radio in New York City is a homegrown cultural phenomenon that is at once aesthetically vibrant, technologically tumultuous, and undeniably illegal. Emanating from clandestine studios and hidden transmitters, the sounds of Kreyol, Yiddish, Spanish, and Caribbean-accented English waft into the urban atmosphere. On an average night in Flatbush, Brooklyn, it’s not uncommon to be able to hear as many as three dozen pirate stations between 87.9 and 107.9 Mhz. This flowering of outlaw micro-radio stations in Brooklyn and throughout the greater New York City region is a major disruption to the status quo of corporate controlled, robo-playlisted mega stations. Their unregulated presence and programming often reflects the throb and hum of a diverse city more authentically than traditional media outlets. Join radio producer David Goren for an audio tour of these stations featuring the music, programs, and personalities that make up New York City’s pirate radio scene.

Monitoring Dusty War Zones and Tropical Paradises – Being a Broadcast Anthropologist

Mark Fahey

Tuning in distant foreign radio and television stations is a conduit to unique and exotic information. These signals are often confronting, uncensored, and unsanitized. In the western world, we blur or pixelate images of death and torture, but signals from war zones or rebellions show tragedies happening live on the air. Other signals broadcast the joy of life on this planet through exotic song, music, and film. Digital wide-band recordings of the electromagnetic spectrum allow virtual time travel, a form of mental teleportation whereby recorded spectrum is tuned to hear stations as if they were being tuned in real time. Take a virtual tour of Mark’s monitoring station in Sydney, Australia which is wired to access the world’s mass media via whatever delivery conduit is needed to capture the content. The station receives hundreds of thousands of inbound digital audio and video channels that let him monitor domestic radio and television from most parts of the world. If he wants to watch breakfast television from Tibet, or maybe the nightly news from the remote Pacific islands of Wallis and Futuna, then it’s available in perfect studio quality. You’ll also see his visits to remote broadcasters and rare, uncensored video from telejournalists that captures the tragedies and joy served up by our planet.

Democratizing Wireless Networks with LimeSDR: Open Source, Field-Programmable RF Technology

Ebrahim Bushehri

This talk presents new, low-cost, open-source, field programmable RF technology, where flexibility is extended from the digital to the RF domain. See demonstrations from the open-source community using the LimeSDR platform, which incorporates two transmitters and two receivers covering 100kHz to 3.8GHz which can emulate GSM, LTE, UMTS, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Zigbee, RFID, HDTV, radio astronomy, passive RADAR, 2G/3G/4G cellsites, IoT gateway, amateur radio, wireless keyboard/mouse transmission/detection, aviation transponders, utility meters, satellite reception, remote tire pressure monitoring, drone command and control, RF test and measurement, and more.

We have more than 150 speakers this time over three days in three tracks.

Thank you Ed! I trust a number of SWLing Post readers will attend HOPE 2016. I certainly wish my travels would make it possible for me to attend this year–it would especially be great to see presentations by my good friends, David Goren and Mark Fahey.

Click here to view The Eleventh HOPE site.

UPDATE: Live streams

Many thanks to post reader, Aaron Kuhn, who notes the following:

In regards to those HOPE talks, the conference talks will be streamed.

[The] schedule of the talks is here:

https://hope.net/grid.html

The streams will be at:

http://livestream.com/internetsociety
http://livestream.com/internetsociety2
http://livestream.com/internetsociety3

(depending on the room the talk is in)