Christmas tunes via pirate radio

Last night–Christmas Eve–I recorded a few minutes of pirate radio station, Wolverine Radio on 6,925 kHz USB. Their signal was very strong here into the shack. Wolverine played a selection of several rockin’ Christmas songs.

Merry Christmas and enjoy!

If media player does not appear above, please click here to listen via Archive.org.

FYI: Receiver – Alinco DX-R8T, Recorder – Zoom H1 recorded in-line, Antenna  – 40 meter vertical delta loop.

 

Chase some pirates this weekend!

Start your search for pirate radio stations in the watering hole at 6,925 kHz and tune up to 7,000 kHz.

As I sit here in front of my radios this Friday evening, I notice the news on National Geographic that we have one of the largest sun spots to face us since 2005. This sunspot is the size of Jupiter! It’s all a little too coincidental on 11-11-11.

It can only mean one thing…

Turn on your radio and tune in some pirates!

For those of you new to pirate radio, most–but not all–activity can be found between 6,925 – 7,000 kHz (i.e. just below the 40 meter ham radio band). Pirates are not professional broadcasters, thus work  a day job during the week. That’s why you’re most likely to hear pirates Friday, Saturday and Sunday evenings.

Pirate signals are often faint–though perhaps old Sol may help a bit, depending on other conditions. For what it’s worth, I just heard a pirate on my tiny Degen DE321 portable (that review out tomorrow). Very good sign, indeed.  Just in case, consider reading our post on using SSB to help dig pirate signals out of the static.

What are you waiting for? Go chase some pirates!

Pirate Radio and Hurricane Irene

Last night, I tuned to the pirate radio watering hole of 6,925 kHz shortwave. I caught a bit of the Southern Relay Network as they played several hurricane and storm themed songs.

I recorded a bit of the end of the show for you. Note that there was a lot of noise on the frequency–many of the static crashes were attributed to Hurricane Irene herself.

Click here to download/play the mp3 file, use the archive.org flash player below (if visible) or simply visit the archive.org audio page. Enjoy!

Radio used, by the way, was the Alinco DX-R8T. We will be posting a review of this receiver, so check back soon!