Tag Archives: Australia

KiwiSDR network updates include native HF FAX

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mark Fahey, who writes:

Lots happening with KiwiSDR – there are now over 130 live 0-30MHz fully controllable SDRs scatted around the world some in really interesting locations. Using Kiwi’s around the world is like being able to go on a exotic DXpedition any time.

Here (attached graphic) is a map of the current locations, you can see the live status of online receivers here:

http://rx.linkfanel.net

and as a list of receivers here:

http://kiwisdr.com/public/

KiwiSDRs now include HF Fax reception natively, just select Fax in the Extension menu, select the part of the world you are interested in and the Kiwi will tune the weather fax frequency and receive the weather fax all natively (no extra software needed) – too easy!

Lots more great things happening.

Here is the latest news…

http://www.kiwisdr.com/#id-31-may-17

Cheers,
Mark

Thank you for the update, Mark! I had no idea the KiwiSDR app had an HF Fax extension. After reading your message, I loaded a KiwiSDR session in Europe and used the Fax feature. It couldn’t have been easier. The screen grab (above) came from my first attempt.

The KiwiSDR network is truly amazing. I use it all the time–especially if there’s an important broadcast happening and I can’t easily receive it at home or while traveling. As an example, during the recent French elections, I listened to results roll in on France Inter mediumwave from a KiwiSDR in Italy. It felt like being there.

My one feature request would be that the KiwiSDR app include some form of native broadcast recording like the WebSDR at U Twente.

Many thanks for the update, Mark!

Click here to read about Mark’s KiwiSDR installation.

Would you like to host your own KiwiSDR?

The whole system only costs $299 US. The KiwiSDR site has a list of distributors around the world.

Amazon has units in stock at $299 US shipped.

I would have purchased a KiwiSDR ages ago–during their Kickstarter campaign–if I only had the Internet bandwidth at home to support it. My Internet speeds are likely lower than anyone else here in the SWLing Post community. One of the compromises living in a relatively remote spot with no RFI. 🙂

ACMA report on radio listening in remote Western Australia

Image: ACMA

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Phil Brennan (VK8VWA), who shares the following:

I spotted this bit of research from the Australian Communications and Media Authority regarding radio listening habits of people living in remote Western Australia.

Click here to download report (PDF).

It shows that radio very much remains a big part of people’s lives in the bush, particularly AM radio. I’m sure these findings would be replicated in the Northern Territory where I live, but as you are only too aware, we’ve had our remote SW radio service axed by the ABC. Anyway, it may be of interest to you and your readers.

Thank you for the tip, Phil.  This is a pretty fascinating report. As you mention, the use of AM radio is quite heavy–no doubt due to the vast broadcast footprint. It’s this sort of report that should have been done prior to any decision about axing ABC’s NT shortwave service.

Western Australia: New low-power shortwave broadcaster seeking listener reports

Many thank to SWLing Post reader, Stefano Mollo–a licensed Australian broadcaster–who shares the following news:

Hi, Thomas,

I have started test transmissions from Perth, Western Australia, on 5,045 kHz, at 75 watts (300 PEP).

Stefano’s HF transmitter

For the time being, I am using the same audio of my other station–77.4 MHz FM–which you can also find and stream online here: www.77400.fm

My test transmission are on the air from about 7:00 pm to about 10:00 pm every evening, local Perth WA time (11:00 – 14:00 UTC).

Please direct listener reports and any enquiries to 77400fm@gmail.com.

Thank you for sharing your news, Stefano!

Post readers: While 300 watts PEP is a modest broadcast signal, no doubt many in Australia, Oceania and Asia will be able to log Stefano’s station when conditions are favorable. During band openings, his signal might travel quite a distance.

Let’s help Stefano by contacting him with detailed listener reports!

The RAAF No. 4 Wireless Unit: Never to march, never to be mentioned

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Neil Bolitho, who shares the following story in reply to our post yesterday Australian Codebreakers in WWII. Neil writes:

Never to march, never to be mentioned.

Since the end of the Second World War, many thousands of returned service personnel have marched at Anzac Day services throughout Australia.

My father never marched.

My father served in RAAF No 4 Wireless Unit, Central Bureau.

Central Bureau was under the direct command of General Douglas MacArthur, and was set up to detect, record, and translate all messages transmitted by Japanese forces in the Pacific.

Central Bureau was headquartered in Brisbane, but its Wireless Units worked in the field, moving forward with MacArthur, constantly intercepting and deciphering enemy messages.

As the war progressed, the units became so efficient in their work that they were monitoring all enemy radio traffic, and in fact frequently knew the Japanese intentions before the messages reached their intended destination.

The Wireless Units served throughout the Pacific islands providing vital information about enemy strengths and positions.

RAAF No 4 Wireless Unit was formed as a highly mobile unit, and served at Hollandia, Morotai, Labuan Island, and at Luzon, Philippines.

The U.S. High Command highly praised the Wireless Units of Central Bureau, stating that their work effectively shortened the War in the Pacific by at least two years.

At the end of the war, Central Bureau was dismantled. All personnel signed a lifetime secrecy order to not speak of their wartime activities.

No promotions applied. No evidence of their Central Bureau service was recorded, including overseas service. No medals were struck.

Family members, including children, were not told in any detail, of their father’s war experience.

It was only in the late 1990’s that the Australian government allowed information to be released.

In the early 1960’s, my father mysteriously went on an unexplained visit to Brisbane.
It was not until over thirty years later that I found out that he attended a twenty-year anniversary of his unit’s graduation.

I write this on behalf of the children and grandchildren of those Central Bureau personnel that served diligently and efficiently when called upon, and who, when the job was done, quietly went home. They are our heroes.

Indeed. Thank you so much, Neil, for taking the time to share your father’s story. We’re honored to post it here.

If you’re interested in WWII signal intelligence, here are a few fascinating posts from our archive:

Australian code breakers in World War II

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Ian P, for sharing the following from the radio program, ABC Overnights:

The crucial role of Australian code breakers in World War 2

Thanks to the recent film, The Imitation Game, you may be familiar with the story of how British intelligence, led by mathematician Alan Turing, cracked Nazi codes during WW2. Did you know there were also two secret organisations in Australia working to break Japan’s military codes?

These were staffed with brilliant cryptographers, including some who had studied mathematics and the classics, and others who had lived or grown up in Japan. By patiently and carefully unravelling the codes in Japanese signals, their intelligence played a crucial role in the battles of Midway and the Coral Sea, as well as the push into the Philippines.

Trevor Chappell interviews Craig Collie, author of the book Code Breakers – Inside the Shadow world of Signals Intelligence in Australia’s two Bletchley Parks.

Duration: 36min 36sec
Broadcast: Mon 10 Apr 2017, 1:00am
Published: Mon 10 Apr 2017, 4:43pm

Listen to the full program/interview via the embedded player below:

Click here to download the MP3 or click here to listen on the ABC website.

I’ve also noted that you can pre-order Code Breakers – Inside the Shadow world of Signals Intelligence in Australia’s two Bletchley Parks at Amazon.com. There is no expected delivery time yet, however.

Code Breakers is available directly from the publisher in Australia–click here to view.