Tag Archives: BBC

Radio World: The evolution of shortwave radio


Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Richard Langley, who shares the following article by James Careless in Radio World Magazine.

The article includes interviews with Andy Sennitt, Kim Andrew Elliott, Nigel Fry,  and even yours truly. The following is a short excerpt taken from the introduction of the article:

(Source: Radio World)

OTTAWA, Ontario — With the advent of radio in the 20th century, the shortwave band (1710–30,000 kHz) soon became a hotbed of long-distance radio broadcasting. Used primarily by state-run international broadcasters, plus ham radio operators and ship-to-shore radio communications, the shortwave band was prized due to its astoundingly broad reach.

That reach was — and is still — made possible by the tendency of ground-based shortwave radio transmissions to bounce off the ionosphere and back to earth; allowing shortwave broadcasts to “hop” repeatedly, increasing a broadcast’s range while minimizing its decay.

[…]At the height of the Cold War, the shortwave bands were packed with content as the Voice of America and West Germany’s Deutsche Welle (Voice of Germany) traded ideological punches with Radio Moscow and East Germany’s Radio Berlin International. This is because analog shortwave radio broadcasting was the only way for both sides to make their political cases cross international borders: There was no satellite TV, let alone any internet.

Read the full, in-depth article on the Radio World website…

This article is well worth reading and one of the more in-depth pieces I’ve seen in a trade publication or news site recently.

I should add that I completely agree with James Careless’ conclusion:

“[T]he research that went into this article suggests that the shortwave band is sufficiently alive to be still evolving.”

The fact is, the shortwave landscape is not what used to be in the Cold War. Many of those big voices have left the scene and, in the process, left the door open to others.

The shortwaves are a dynamic communications space that continues to evolve.

That’s why I keep listening.

Want to read more about the future of shortwave radio? Click here to read Does Shortwave Radio Have a Future?

Secret life of village that helped crack WWII code

WWii-radio(Source: Southgate ARC)

Whaddon: Secret life of village that helped crack WW2 code

On May 9, 2016, Milton Keynes Amateur Radio Society members operated GB1SOE to establish contact with French special event station TM75SOE using WWII equipment

This was to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the first transmission sent back to Whaddon Hall, Buckinghamshire, by Special Operations Executive (SOE) agent Georges Begue. They operated from Whaddon Hall during Monday using a replica MKIII transmitter and HRO receiver,  on the French side a WWII B2 spy set was used.

The BBC report: The Codebreakers at Bletchley Park are well known for their top secret work which helped to change the course of the World War Two.

But the Buckinghamshire village of Whaddon, just a few miles down the road, has long been forgotten, despite the vital role it played. It was codenamed Section 8 and was a satellite station for Bletchley Park.

It is hoped a new memorial will give it its rightful place in history.

Watch the BBC TV report on the commemoration at Whaddon

A shorter version of the BBC report is at

Further information in the QRZ.com entries for TM75SOE and GB1SOE

Milton Keynes Amateur Radio Society (MKARS)

BBC to cut monitoring jobs

(Image source: BBC)

(Source: The Guardian)

The BBC is cutting almost 100 jobs from its monitoring service as part of a drive to save £4m from the unit’s £13.2m budget by April next year.

The restructure will include the closure of its base in Mazar-i-Sharif in Afganistan, though it will retain an operation in Kabul, and two new bureaux will be opened in Jerusalem and Istanbul.

The unit, which currently employs about 320 staff, will also move its headquarters from Caversham Park, Reading, where it has been based since 1943, to London.

A total of 156 roles will be eliminated and 58 new ones created, leaving a net reduction of 98 positions. About 40% of UK-based staff and around 20% of those based overseas are facing the axe, leaving 99 roles left in the UK.

The unit provides translations and analysis of media from across the world including TV, radio, newspapers, online, and social media, for use by the BBC, government departments and other clients including companies and NGOs.[…]

Click here to read the full article at The Guardian.

Listening across the globe: 2016 BBC Antarctic Midwinter Broadcast!


On Tuesday, 21 June 2016, the BBC World Service officially transmitted the 2016 BBC Antarctic Midwinter Broadcast–an international radio broadcast intended for a small group of scientists, technicians, and support staff who work for the British Antarctic Survey.

This is one of my favorite annual broadcasts, and I endeavor to listen every year. Once again, the SWLing Post called upon readers to make a short recording of the broadcast from their locale.

Below are the entries, roughly organized by continent and country/region, including reader’s photos if provided. I had planned to post these recordings by Sunday, but my travels interfered and I discovered an additional ten recordings in my inbox! (If I’ve somehow missed including your entry, please contact me; I’ll amend this post.)

So, without further ado….

The 2016 BBC Antarctic Midwinter Broadcast Recordings


SWL (Shortwave Listener): Rob Wagner
Location: Mt Evelyn, Victoria, Australia
Notes: [A] 12 minute video record of the broadcast that also demonstrates some tuning techniques and DSP facilities on the Yaesu FTDX3000. You can view the video below or by clicking here:

Paul's Icom IC-7300 tuned to the BBC Midwinter broadcast.

Paul’s Icom IC-7300 tuned to the BBC Midwinter broadcast.

SWL: Paul Philbrook
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Notes:  Here are a couple of recordings from this mornings broadcast. Just had a quick listen before heading off to work and recorded these two with the IC-7300. Radio: Icom IC-7300 Aerial: Multi-band loaded dipole. 5985 Khz strength 5 readable, 6035 Khz strength 8 good readability, 7360 Khz no copy.

Click here to download recording 1 and recording 2, or simply listen via the embedded players below:

New Zealand

SWL: Bryan Clark
Location: Mangawhai,  New Zealand
Notes: Listening in New Zealand, reception was not as good as last year.
Here are short audio files of the 3 frequencies. I used an EWE antenna aimed southeast, that is across South America, for the best signals. Receiver is a WinRadio Excalibur Pro SDR.

7360 kHz recording:

6035 kHz recording:

5985 kHz recording:




Christoph Ratzer

SWL: Christoph Ratzer
Location: Salzburg, Austria
Notes: Here my complete recording for you. Received at my remote station http://remotedx.wordpress.com in Salzburg, WinRadio G33 Excalibur PRO, Delta loop antenna with Bonito ML052 amplifier.

Christoph's Delta external loop antenna

Christoph’s Delta external loop antenna

Click here to download the recording, or simply listen via the embedded player below:


SWL: Willy Andersen
Location: Soeborg, Denmark
Notes: Here is my recording from 7360kHz on June 21. 2016. Very strong and clean signal. Vy 73 de Willy, OZ4ZT

Click here to download the recording or simply listen via the embedded player below:



SWL: Philippe
Location: L’Hôpital-Camfrout, France (few km south of Brest)
Notes: Very good conditions here, good sound. Equipment: Yaesu FT817ND + V inverted antenna and Yaesu Vx7r + original antenna (little stick on the radio). On both radios, reception: 59 / 59+

20160621_234515 20160621_234327

Google map link to the city.

YouTube video of 5985 kHz broadcast.

YouTube video of 7360 kHz broadcast.


SWL: Alan
Location: County Kildare, Ireland
Notes: 5,985 kHz Woofferton. Distance: 280km. Recorded from County Kildare, Ireland
with an Icom-718 and 20m Random wire on an Olympus vn-741pc.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:


Renato Feuli's (IK0OZK) staion

Renato Feuli’s (IK0OZK) staion

SWL: Renato Feuli (IK0OZK)
Location: Valentano, Italy
Notes:  Woofferton at 5.895 Khz AM
Time UTC 21.33
Signal Report R/S R5 S 9+15 Db Very Good signal and audio
RTX JRC 245 and Windom antenna

To Ascension at 7.360 Khz AM
Time UTC 21.33
Signal Report R/S R5 S 9+10 Db Very Good Signal and audio
Receiver JRC NRD 545 Dsp and Long-Wire antenna

Click here to watch video via YouTube.

Woofferton and Ascension at 21.45 UTC:

Click here to watch video via YouTube.

To Dhabayya at 6.035 Khz AM
Time UTC 21.38
Signal Report R/S R3 S 4/5 Low Signal and many QRM and QSB
Receiver JRC NRD 91 and Long-Wire antenna

Click here to watch video via YouTube.

Below, please find an audio file for Ascension at 7.360 Khz AM 21.40 UTC:

Please check out Renato’s radio blog by clicking here.

SWL: Joseph
Location: Ponza island, Italy
Notes: I am Joseph in Ponza island, Italy, with pleasure I send you a video of the Antarctic Midwinter 2016 recorded yesterday night with my old smartphone … great about the 5985 and 7360 frequencies, very poor reception on 6035, I used the 3 receivers Yaesu vr5000 connected on a discone antenna “Midland full band”, AOR ar 3030 and Kenwood R1000 on antenna “Mini Whip”.

Click here to watch via Vimeo.


SWL: Davide Borroni
Location: Saronno, Italy
Notes: 21 June 2016 at 2130-2200 UTC on 7360 KHZ AM. I listened to the BBC broadcast with SINPO 54444. I listened to beautiful music and talk. Thanks for show !  I used my R&S ESH3 (see above) with my magnetic loop 2 meter diameter antenna.

Click here to download the recording, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

David also included the following videos featuring his Siemens E401 and Racal RA 1778:


SWL: Alessio Proietti
Location: Rome, Italy
Notes: Receiver: Yaesu FRG 7700 Antenna, 10mt rybakov, Frequency: 5985 kHz AM, Details: nice reception today S9+40 with a light QSB.

Click here to download the recording, or listen via the embedded player below:

SWL: Andrea Borgnino
Location: Rome, Italy
Notes: BBC Antarctic Midwinter Broadcast 2016 – 5985 khz 21/6/2016 recorded in Roma Italy. Click here to listen on SoundCloud.

SWL: Adalberto Maria Tassi
Location: Rome, Italy
Notes: 5985 kHz, SINPO 55544, Icom IC-R71e, Antenna: Wellbrook ALA-1530

Click here to view the video on Vimeo.

Screenshot from Marc's SDR.

Screenshot from Marc’s SDR.

SWL: Marc Vittorini
Location: Favria, Italy
Notes: Frequency of 5985 KHz, SINPO 43333, Receiver RTL Dongle +, SDRSHARP, Antenna: homemade longwire

Click here to download or simply listen via the embedded player below:

BBC Midwinter Antarctic B.

SWL: Gabriele Somma
Location: Roccapiemonte province Salerno, Italy
Notes: Frequency 5.985 Khz AM, S.I.N.P.O SIGNAL S9+30+,

Receiver Icom PCR 1500:


Antenna ALA 1530 LN:


Gabriele includes the following video of his IC-PCR1500 tuned to the broadcast:

SWL: Rotunno Vincenzo
Location: Italy
Notes: I0550/RM, 5.985.00 MHz AM, Sr 59+40, Kenwood ts 870 ant random

Click here to view on Vimeo.

Northern Ireland

SWL: Jordan Heyburn
Location: Northern Ireland

BBC World Service Special Broadcast to Antarctica 5985khz received in Northern Ireland using a SDR Play RSP & Wellbrook ALA1530LN Active Loop Antenna. Click here to view on YouTube.


SWL: Chris Ditrich
Location: Poland
Notes: Reception on 5985 kHz and 7360 kHz was very good 59 – 58, however reception on 6035 kHz was not that good, signal was there but not much readable

5985 kHz

Click here to listen via YouTube.

Click here to view on YouTube.

7360 kHz

Click here to view on YouTube.


SWL: Dmitry Elagin
Location: Saratov, Russia
Notes: I accepted BBC Antarctic Midwinter Broadcast in Saratov, Russia. I made video record by means of my SDRPlay.

Click here to view on Vimeo.

I also listened to the test program on June 14.
I published my supervision here – http://freerutube.info/2016/06/22/e-qsl-bbc-antarctic-midwinter-broadcast-14-iyunya-2016-goda/.

[Dmitry also included the following YouTube video:

United Kingdom

SWL: Chris Inwood
Location: Conrwall, England
Notes: [R]ecorded on 5.985 MHz. This frequency was by far the best quality. I was able to copy 7.365 here but there was slight QSB and some interference from an adjacent broadcaster HCJB. 6.035 was not heard at all neither was 9.720 MHz. Very best wishes and thanks, I always look forward to my email.

Click here to download the MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Mark Hirst's listening post.

Mark Hirst’s listening post.

SWL: Mark Hirst
Location: Basingstoke, Hampshire
Notes: Thanks for alerting shortwave listeners to the British Antarctic Survey broadcast. It felt very poignant listening to a broadcast aimed at such a small number of people, with the voices of their loved ones being launched around the world.

I was able to record the broadcast from only 100 miles away from the Woofferton transmitter, so needless to say the quality and strength was very good. I imagine hearing that broadcast buried in the noise from far away with those happy birthday songs and best wishes must have been very emotional for its intended audience.

I enclose a short segment from my 30 minute recording, plus a photo (above) taken the next day of my set up (it was dark at the time of the recording).

My recording location was Basingstoke, Hampshire in the UK – locator IO91LH 20HH

[Note that Mark also recorded the full 30 minute broadcast which you can download by clicking here.]

SWL: Dean Allison
Location: Bedlington, Northumberland, England
Notes: I have attached an audio file of the BBC transmission to Antarctica. My location is Bedlington, Northumberland, England, about 100 feet above sea level, using a Kenwood R5000 receiver and a 30 feet longwire antenna about 12 feet off the ground. This was the 5985 kHz transmission.

Click here to download or simply listen via the embedded player below:

SWL: Jerry Rhys
Location: Surrey, England
Notes: Attached are two recordings of today’s BBC Antarctic Broadcast made between
2130 and 2150z. The first recording was made using AM mode with 8 kHz bandwidth on 5985 then 7360, followed by 6035. The second recording was made using SAM mode with 10 kHz bandwidth on 7360, 6035, and 5985.

The best signal was on 5985, 7360 was weak but readable, on 6035 I could detect a carrier and occasional modulation – on this frequency there was also interference from a digital transmission on 6037. Nothing heard on 9720.

I was using a RF Space SDR-IQ Receiver, and a Wellbrook ALA1530S Loop
Antenna installed in my loft. Many thanks for the SWLing Post, always an enjoyable read!

Recording 1: 

Recording 2:

SWL: Alan (G4TMV)
Location: northern England
Notes: Reception of this special broadcast was excellent here in northern England on 5985 kHz. It was an enjoyable broadcast again, but Babcock weren’t wasting any electricity on it, it came on and went off again almost spot on 2130 and 2200!

Click here to download, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

SWL: Dom B
Location: Newcastle Under Lyme, England
Notes:  I live streamed the midwinter broadcast on my Tecsun PL-380 from my location in Newcastle Under Lyme in the UK

Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQXgYSDjTkI

SWL: Lawrence Beedle
Location: Manchester, England
Notes: Here is my recording of the mid winter broadcast by the BBC 21st June 2016. Tecsun PL660 telescopic aerial, indoors, sat at kitchen table in a house in Manchester, England, UK. 5985khz good reception. 6035 kHz not as strong, 7360 kHz no reception. Recorded on iPhone next to speaker on radio. 36 seconds.

Click here to download the MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:


David’s (G4EDR) listening post.

SWL: David Mappin
Location: Filey, England
Notes:  Just thought I would let you know how I got on with the BBC WS broadcast to Antarctica. I used my Icom IC-R75 receiver and a Wellbrook ALA1530 inside the house. 5985 kHz was very strong with me here on the east coast of the UK (NVIS propagation?). Nothing heard on 6035 or 9720 but a weak signal on 7360. Attached (above) is a photograph of my listening post. This is a link to a YouTube video of the start of the broadcast. My very best regards and thank you for your excellent website.

A screenshot from Cap's Elad FDM-S2 SDR.

A screenshot from Cap’s Elad FDM-S1 SDR.

SWL: Cap
Location: N.W. Scotland
Notes: Here is my attempt last night with SDR screenshot attached, Elad FDM-S1 with homebrew mini Mag Loop (<250mm dia) sitting on my bookcase. No doubt there will be better signals/recordings than mine as the signal was really strong from WOF and considering my setup is 100% indoors, it came out ok. External antennas don’t last here as I am by the sea and regular 100mph+ storms in the winter is too much hassle.

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

North America


BBC Antarctic Midwinter Broadcast Test (not) 0 00 16-29

SWL: Richard Langley
Location: New Brunswick
Notes: Tecsun PL-880 receiver with a Tecsun AN-03L 7-metre wire antenna in AM mode with 5.0 kHz RF filtering at the back of my yard. The photo [of Richard’s outdoor portable listening post] was taken during some other recordings last year.

Click here to listen to Richard’s recording, or simply use the embedded player below:

Click here to listen to Richard’s full half-hour recordings on the SRAA.


SWL: Thomas Witherspoon
Location: Saint-Anne-de-Beaupré, Québec
Notes: I traveled to an RFI quite spot in the parking lot of the Basilica in St.-Anne-de-Beaupré, Québec. Click here to read a full post about my set-up and conditions. Note that I used a Sony ICF-SW55 receiver (above), perched on top of my vehicle and tuned to 7360 kHz.

Click here to download the full recording of the broadcast, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Unites States

SWL: Dan Hawkins
Location: Davis, California
Notes: Here is my YouTube video. I’m using both the Sangean and Hammarlund receivers to hunt down the BBC Midwinter Antarctic Broadcast. Probably a somewhat different result than on most of the videos, but probably typical of West Coast propagation at these frequencies and times.

SWL: Nace Magner
Location: Bowling Green, Kentucky
Notes:  Please find attached a video of my reception of the BBC broadcast. Unfortunately, a thunderstorm passed through about 10 minutes prior to the video and the audio is dominated by lightning-related crashes. However, the BBC signal can be heard periodically. My location was on a university campus in Bowling Green, Kentucky, which is about 50 miles north of Nashville, Tennessee. I received the signal using a Tecsun PL-660 and its whip antenna. I enjoy the SWLing site. Best regards, Nace Magner (KW4LY)

Click here to view on Vimeo.

Wow–Thank you!

Once again, many thanks to all of you who submitted your recordings of the BBC Midwinter Broadcast! We’ll be sharing this post with both the British Antarctic Survey and the BBC World Service. And to all of you, from the SWLing Post: Happy Midwinter! Happy Summer/Winter Solstice!

BBC Waveguide and Letterbox archives now available online


Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mike Barraclough, who writes:

BBC World Service Archives continue to put up programmes on the main site, they were previously available on a beta site you had to register for and were allowed to add tags or edit data. 64 editions of Waveguide, their radio broadcasting developments programme now up, first one 21 April 1988. last one 14 March 2001.


There were only 4 editions of the long running Letterbox on the beta site but they have been transferred over, includes the final edition. None of World Radio Club in the archives unfortunately.


Many thanks for the tip, Mike! I’m happy the BBC is making their archives even more accessible as a part of their strategic plan. Please let us know if you note any other archives of interest!