Tag Archives: Ham Radio

Updated Frequency Bands Chart from the ARRL

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Steve, who notes that the ARRL has updated their downloadable Frequency Band Charts.

I find it interesting that the ARRL also noted the following on their download page:

NOTE: The new 630-meter and 2200-meter bands are not yet available for Amateur Radio use. The effective date of the recent FCC Report & Order granting these allocations has not yet been determined, and until the start date has been set, it is not legal under an Amateur Radio license to transmit on either band. The FCC will publish a notice in The Federal Register “announcing such approval and the relevant effective date.” ARRL will announce the UTC notification procedures and the effective date to use these new bands as soon as these are known.

I’ve received feedback from SWLing Post readers noting a licensed amateur radio operator in Tennessee who had already set up an active beacon on the 630 meter band. He eventually pulled the plug. No doubt, this was why the ARRL posted a special note.

Downloading and printing the charts

Download and print PDF documents using Adobe Reader.

ABC Amendment Billl Submissions & State Emergency Service

Front gate of the Shepparton Transmission site.

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Nigel Holmes, for sharing a link to the public submissions for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Amendment (Restoring Shortwave Radio) Bill 2017.

Click here to read submissions.


On a separate note, Nigel also sent info about the SES (State Emergency Service) in Australia. I didn’t know about this service. Nigel notes:

SES is State Emergency Service, we provide volunteer responses to storm, flood, land search, vehicle accident response (in rural areas).

All AUS emergency response services use HF–ditto sailors, private pilots, bushwalkers (hikers).

Individuals can get an Outpost license (400 W PEP) or Land/Marine Mobile license (125 W PEP) for $20 a year to use HF across the country for private or commercial communications. Cheaper than an amateur license ($60 /yr)!

Click here for more info about the SES.

Potomac Valley Radio Club (PVRC) and the US Naval Academy Radio Club to operate NSS special event May 13

Photo: US Coast Guard

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Brian D. Smith, who writes:

Longtime SWLs will recall the repeating CW messages of Coast Guard station NSS and its distinctive “DAH-dit di-di-dit di-di-dit” ID.

There’s even a nostalgia page created in its honor: http://hawkins.pair.com/nss.shtml – along with a Wikipedia entry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSS_Annapolis – and an online history: http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/facility/greenbury-point.htm – among other online references.

Unfortunately, like most other such CW stations of its day, NSS is gone forever … right? Wrong! Get this: NSS will return from the dead during Armed Forces Day crossband tests on May 13!

Here’s what the ARRL is reporting:

“The Potomac Valley Radio Club (PVRC) and the US Naval Academy Radio Club will operate NSS on the site of the 1918 Naval Radio Transmitting Station on Greenbury Point in Annapolis, Maryland, across the Severn River from the US Naval Academy.”

How cool is that?
http://www.arrl.org/news/armed-forces-day-crossband-military-amateur-radio-communications-test-is-may-13

So both hams and SWLs can obtain a QSL card from this ghost of a station. Personally, I’m thrilled with the news, because I was never able to get a QSL card from NSS or any similar station during my teenage years.

As far as I know, this is the first time NSS has been heard since … what, 1999? It certainly wasn’t on the air during last year’s Armed Forces Day radio event.

Wow–thank you for the tip, Brian! I, too, would love to snag an NSS QSL card!

W9IMS special event stations, May 7-13

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Brian D. Smith, who writes:

My radio club is about to begin another year of W9IMS special events commemorating the 3 major auto races at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway: the Grand Prix of Indianapolis, the Indianapolis 500 and the Brickyard 400.

We’re among the most popular annual special event operations in the United States (along with the Original 13 Colonies and Route 66). Our first special event (for the Grand Prix) will run from May 7-13; for more complete info, go to www.w9ims.org

As you probably recall, we offer 3 new and colorful QSL cards every year, as well as a nice certificate for stations that work all 3 special events in a given year.

Naturally, the offer extends to SWLs as well … so paper chasers, take note! And here’s a tip for locating us when we’re on the air: Keep an eye on DX Summit — http://www.dxsummit.fi/#/ – which will feature constantly updated DX spots for W9IMS during our weeks of operation.

Excellent–thanks for sharing this, Brian. It’s great to know that this event will also issue QSLs for SWL reports!

ARISS contact today: stream on the web or perhaps listen with your radio!

NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson’s 7th Spacewalk (Image source: NASA)

Last night, my buddy Eric McFadden (WD8RIF) notified me that the International Space Station would be making a pass this morning and doing an ARISS contact with three schools in Belgium.

It appears this pass will create an opportunity for some of us at least in eastern North America (and elsewhere) to listen to the transmission live.

Eric notes:

The frequency of the downlink should be 145.800MHz. As the ISS climbs above your horizon, because of doppler-shift, listen on 145.805. Switch to 145.800 as the ISS approaches zenith. Switch to 145.795 as the ISS drops toward the other horizon. You’ll know when to switch frequency when the audio gets bad.

[…]The ISS runs real power so an HT with anything but the shortest rubber duck should be OK, particularly when the ISS is well above the horizon. A 1/2-wave whip on the HT is better.

The contact starts at 13:47 UTC (08:47 EST)–about one hour from time of this posting.

As Eric notes, pretty much any VHF handheld radio or scanner can easily receive this contact as long as you can tune to 145.80 MHz +/-.

Last time I was in a place to tune to the ISS, it was with my kids and we all got a kick out of hearing astronauts answer questions from children here on Terra Firma. I wrote a short post about this.

Don’t worry if you miss this ARISS contact–they happen all the time. Check the ARISS “Upcoming Contacts” (http://www.ariss.org/upcoming-contacts.html) page where future ARISS QSOs are listed. No doubt, it will pass over your part of the globe at some point!

Southgate ARC also posted the following announcement with a link to the live webcast:

ARISS contact webcast

On Thursday 12 January 2017, an ARISS contact is scheduled with three schools in Belgium.

Two schools will operate from the Euro Space Center.

The event will be web streamed live on:
https://www.facebook.com/eurospacecenter

The radio contact is scheduled at 13.47 UTC, which 14.37 CEWT.

The web streaming will start around 14.00 local time.

73,

Gaston Bertels, ON4WF
ARISS past chairman

Thanks again, Eric, for the tip!