Tag Archives: Iran

Photos from an EP2C field event


Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mehdi Asgari, who writes with news from his amateur radio club (EP2C):


We had a one-day [amateur radio] program on July 16, 2016.


Our club organized an activity from 5:00 AM local time to 8:30 PM (local time) in Karaj’s heights (50 km of Tehran).


We had a vertical for 15 and 20m, an Inverted-Vee for 15 and 20m and a Magnetic loop (can be tuned from 10 to 22 MHz).


We operated two bands (mainly 20m and some 15m), both SSB and CW.


Propagation was not very good but we managed some good DX contacts (East of USA: Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio, etc, Japan, Canada, …).



Antennas were made by us and we used two rigs (Icom 735 for CW and Elecraft K3 for SSB).
It was also an educational program for enthusiasts and beginners.



Thank you so much, Mehdi, for sharing EP2C special event!

I imagine your field station attracted a lot of attention on the DX Clusters and I bet you were on “the other end” of more than one pile-up despite the bad propagation.

Your club also used two great field radios: the benchmark Elecraft K3 and  the Icom IC-735. Two radios from two completely different eras! I imagine the age gap between the two was pushing three decades. The IC-735 was my first ham radio transceiver. Though it’s an older rig, it holds its own in the field and has proven itself reliable (the ‘735 also had one of the better general coverage receivers of the era). Of course, the Elecraft K3 has become the DXpeditioner’s choice transceiver due to its performance, versatility and efficiency.

Thanks again for sharing your event with us, Mehdi.  I hope to hear EP2C on the air again very soon!

First Iranian ham radio contest


To celebrate 37th anniversary of Iranian Islamic revolution, the first Iranian ham contest is going to be held on February 1st, 2016 and will last for 10 days.

Objective: To encourage and increase contacts (especially DX ones) with Iranian radio amateurs.


Contest Period: 10 days (Feb 01, 00:00 UTC – Feb 11, 23:59 UTC)

All modes (CW, SSB, RTTY) can be used on this period.


40, 20, 15 and 10 meters

Note: On 20m, the upper limit is 14.250 MHZ

Contact information:

For contest information and any sort of inquiries contact epcontest.2016@gmail.com


Certificates will be awarded to:

1- Top single operator (at least 30 contacts on all modes)

2- Top CW operator

3- Top SSB operator

4- Top RTTY operator

5- Any operator who contacts at least 3 Iranian hams

Getting QSL card:

If you need the printed certificate, you should send 5USD (or equivalent in your          currency) to this address: “P.O. Box 14185-736 , Tehran, Iran”

Please use registered mail to make sure it delivers without problems.

WebMoney and Bitcoin are also accepted. (Contact us for more information)


Iranian amateurs will use “/contest” at the end of their call sign for this contest.

The deadline for contacting us for certificate is 3 months after the contest.

List of Iranian participants:

  1. EP2FM  : Abdollah Sajjadian
  2. EP3RB : Reza Batebi
  3. EP3AG  : Ali Ghanbari
  4. EP2FA   : Farman Aghdasi
  5. EP2CM : Jamshid Mansoori
  6. EP4HR  : Hamid-Reza Rahimi
  7. EP3MIR : Mohammad Mobini
  8. EP3CQ : Ali Solh-Joo
  9. EP2LMA : Mohammad Azimi
  10. EP2LSH: Saeed Shokrollahi
  11. EP2HZM : Hassan Zohoorian
  12. EP2HEK : Hekmatollah Rahimi
  13. EP5MKN : Majid Kiani Nejad
  14. EP5ABD : Bagher Mir-Abdolhagh
  15. EP7AHN : Hamed Nahrir
  16. EP4KHA : Amin Kharadmehr
  17. EP4MMM : Mohammad Mirab
  18. EP2MA : Mohammad Ameli
  19. EP2LSD : Sepehr Dalir
  20. EP3EEE: Ehsan Esteki

Mehdi Asgari, the author of this post, is a regular contributor to the SWLing Post. Mehdi lives in Tehran and is an active member of the EP2C amateur radio club.

Hearing Ghadir: Iran’s Sepehr Phased Radar System


In response to Andrea’s UVB-76 recording, SWLing Post contributor, Mehdi, comments:

Thomas, another signal which may sound mysterious:

Iran’s OTH Radar, named “Ghadir”; part of Iran’s Sepehr Phased Radar System.

They’d polluted the 10-meter band [in the past]; now they transmit on 26MHZ. (See spectrum in screen capture above.)

Sound: https://clyp.it/ldpxab2a

By the way, here’s my recording of UVB-76:

Many thanks for sharing those audio clips, Mehdi! Now I’ll know what Ghadir sounds like, should I hear it on the bands.

RFE: Radio Farda Families A Target In Iran

One of the points I often make is that repressive regimes can track and take action against citizens who read online content from banned/blocked media sources. Here is a case in point:

(Source: Radio Free Europe)

In an escalation of ongoing efforts to thwart Radio Farda, RFE/RL’s Persian-language Service, Iranian authorities are interrogating journalists’ family members in Iran.

Employees of Radio Farda believe that their journalism, which attracts over 10 million page views monthly on Radio Farda’s website, is the motive behind at least 20 incidents this year involving the interrogation and intimidation of their family members in Iran by officials of the country’s Intelligence Ministry.

In sessions that sometimes lasted for several hours, agents denounced the work of Radio Farda journalists and warned family members against having further contact with them. In several cases they instructed family members to tell their relatives to resign from their jobs and return to Iran; in one instance they demanded that a specific series of reports be discontinued. During questioning, family members were also asked about their foreign contacts and trips abroad.

The interrogations have targeted family members, who in some cases have been repeatedly summoned, in Tehran and at least six other Iranian towns and cities.

“This is a proxy war against Radio Farda. It shows the extremes to which the regime will go to prevent the exchange of information it doesn’t control,” said Steven W. Korn, RFE/RL president. “Our journalists make enormous sacrifices for the work they do and will not submit to this pressure on them and their families.”

Radio Farda, produced in and broadcast from Prague, is a leading source of uncensored information in Iran. Each month 1.5 million users inside the country defy the government by employing proxies to access Radio Farda’s website, which is blocked. Radio Farda and “Pasfarda,” its signature satire program, are active on social media, with a combined 300,000 Facebook fans. Iranians actively participate in Radio Farda’s weekly call-in shows, connect with it daily through hundreds of email and SMS messages, and despite government jamming, tune in to satellite radio and shortwave to hear its programs.

In media freedom surveys this year, Freedom House ranked Iran 192 among 197 countries surveyed and Reporters Without Borders ranked it 175 of 179.

Yet one more reason why shortwave radio is safer than the internet as a reliable source of news and information and one more reason why countries like Canada should not abandon this vital resource.