Tag Archives: Mario Filippi (N2HUN)

Panasonic RF-2200 on ShopGoodwill

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi (N2HUN) who shares a link to this National Panasonic RF-2200 on ShopGoodwill.

The bid is currently $78 and ends this evening. You must be registered with ShopGoodwill and have a PayPal account to place a bid.

Note that I’ve had some very good luck in the past with ShopGoodwill, but buying from them is more akin to buying from a flea market than, say, eBay.

Almost always items are sold as-is, no returns, have mediocre low resolution product photos, and are not properly tested. In the case of this RF-2200, it appears the Goodwill employee turned on the radio and tuned the FM band which worked fine.

If you’re willing to take the risk, though, you can often snag great deals on ShopGoodwill.

eBay find: The IFR Aeoroflex T-1200SRA

The Aeoroflex T-1200SRA receiver

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi (N2HUN), who writes:

Every once in a while an IFR (Instrument Flight Research, a.k.a. Aeroflex) T-1200SRA comes up for auction, it is a sophisticated receiver covering LF-HF-VHF-UHF with built-in spectrum analyzer.

Click here to view on eBay.

Some claim these were used by the FCC for surveillance. I can believe that as IFR is a professional manufacturer of commercial radio test equipment. I have their 500A service monitor.

Beautiful receiver, but this one is way overpriced. They usually start around a grand or so with a “Make Offer” contingency. One was sold in December for $481.

Click here to search eBay for a T-1200SRA.

Thank you for sharing this, Mario! Knowing the IFR is essentially a piece of test equipment, I’m very curious how it  might compare with a similarly-priced tabletop (broadcast) radio.

Post readers: Anyone else own a IFR T-1200SRA?

Panasonic RF-2200: Mario spots the model RD-9820 matching coupler

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi (N2HUN), who writes:

This antenna coupler was the companion for the RF-2200, they come up once in a while on eBay. Just some radio memorabilia/trivia to store away in the SWL file of brain hihi.

Click here to view on eBay.

Thank you, Mario! Until last year or so, I wasn’t aware the RF-220 had a matching coupler. I’m sure radio collectors would jump on one of these in good condition. It’s a lot to pay for a simple coupler, though this seller appears to accept best offers.

The great thing about eBay is if you’re looking for something rare and are willing to pay for it, the world is your oyster.

On the other hand, there’s exactly what Mario implies: many of us find eBay to be an amazing resource for discovering rare radio items, tucking them away in the dark recesses of our radio brains, which then helps us spot them when they pop up at local hamfests, swap meets, yard sales or thrift stores!

Radio Wall Clocks: Mario’s eBay find

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi (N2HUN), who writes:

Hi Thomas,

These have been popping up on eBay, reasonable price, with face markings just like an old shortwave radio dial.

Click here to view Zenith wall clock.

Pretty nice gift for the SWL who has everything!

Click here to view Sparton wall clock.

Have a good day and weekend!

Thank you, Mario! Those are nice clocks and, as you say, rather affordable at $26.49 shipped! I like the fact they also include 24 hour markings.

Your message lead me down a path to search eBay for other radio wall clocks. There are hundreds out there! I found that searching with the term “ham radio wall clock” seemed to work best.

Guest Post: Remembering our Elmers

Photo: Mario Filippi (N2HUN)

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi (N2HUN), for the following guest post:


‘Tis the Season to be Jolly and to Remember Our Elmers

by Mario Filippi (N2HUN)

At this time of year when we gather with friends, family, coworkers and acquaintances to share the bonhomie and joys of the holidays let us fondly remember those who brought us into this hobby, our dear Elmers, those individuals who’ve given of their time teaching us the basics of ham radio, answered our endless questions, inspired us by their shacks, guided us through the difficulties of radio theory and good operating practices and proctored us through our first examinations. If it weren’t for these selfless individuals, who followed a time-honored tradition of mentoring budding hams, the hobby would not continue on and most of us might have taken other paths and missed out on a life-long, very rewarding hobby.

To start the ball of reminiscences rolling, take a seat with me in the time machine of memories and go back to the early 1970’s, to the suburbs of White Plains, NY, the home of my Elmer, may he rest in peace, George Buchanan, WB2FVX (SK).

George held Novice classes once a week in the basement of his home where he tutored a gaggle of ham wannabes consisting of grammar school kids to those of advanced age, some of whom were old railroad telegraphers schooled in the use of sounders. We’d have an hour of lecture, followed by code practice, then the class would end with general socializing amongst the students as to what transpired along with our future plans for our “shacks.”

You know, George did not quit his day job to train us through our larval stages of the hobby; as a matter of fact he commuted to the city every day and still found the time once a week to start his 7:00 PM class for his eager students, and always had energy after a long day’s work to stand in front of his chalkboard and work out the numerous electronic calculations (OHM’s Law, parallel and series circuits of resistors and capacitors, antenna resonance and impedance ) and list important regulations that would be included in our FCC Novice exams. At the conclusion of the three month course, George sat through our Novice exams and mailed them off to the FCC Office in Gettysburg, PA. Back then it took a few months before you’d get your license and hold in your hand the fruits of your (and your Elmer’s) labors.

George has been a silent key for decades now, and he frequently comes to mind, especially during the holiday season, when thoughts of Christmases past and all of the pleasant memories of almost forty years in the hobby occupy my mind. Indeed, George and all the other Elmers out there, living and deceased, have bestowed upon us one of the greatest gifts of all – Amateur Radio.

Think back on your Elmer and do so with fondness and when the opportunity presents itself, take an inexperienced ham under your wing, guide them, inspire them, show them your shack, answer their questions, help them pick out a rig or accessory, have a QSO with them, help them with troubleshooting, accompany them to a hamfest, share the joys with them when they purchase a piece of equipment, and most of all, be there for them.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all!


Thank you, Mario, for sharing these special memories with us! George was an ideal Elmer indeed–he had the ability to share his enthusiasm and passion with others and helped them obtain their license during a time when study materials were not so readily available (and the test was much more challenging!).

Thank you, Mario!