2016 Radio Prague QSL Cards

Radio-Prague-QSLMany thanks to SWLing Post contributor, David Iurescia (LW4DAF), who writes:

Hi Thomas:

I hope you have started a very good year!!!
I’m sending you the link where you can see the new 2016 QSLs from Radio Prague:

http://radio.cz/en/static/qsl/qsl-cards

These are about religious buildings in the Czech Republic.

Yours from Argentina

David Iurescia LW4DAF

Very cool!  Thanks for passing this along, David!

Click here to view at Radio Prague.

WWV History: Richard’s QSL cards

WWV-First-Sign-SM

Sign from the original WWV tranmitter site in Maryland, currently posted outside of the Fort Collins, Colorado transmitter building. (Photo: Thomas Witherspoon)

Commenting on our post about Myke’s new release of At The Tone, SWLing Post contributor Richard Langley writes:

I must have first heard WWV shortly after putting together the Knight-Kit Span Master I received for Christmas 1963. I still have my log books from my high school days, which include an entry for Radio Habana on 29 December 1963 for which I subsequently received a QSL card. But I guess I didn’t log all my receptions. The first entry for WWV is dated 3 June 1966 in the last year of WWV’s operation from Greenbelt, Maryland (on government land that subsequently became the site of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center).

WWV_QSL_frontWWV_QSL_back

I have a QSL card for the reception of the 5 MHz signal featuring a drawing (in pink) of the Jefferson Memorial [see above].

The next entry is dated 1 December 1966, the first day of WWV’s operation from Fort Collins, Colorado.

WWV_firstday_QSL_frontWWV_firstday_QSL_back

I have one of the special QSL cards issued for confirmation of first-day reception for my report on the 20 and 25 MHz signals [see above].

I’m sure I heard WWVH early on too but my first log entry is dated 29 March 1967. I never did QSL them.

Richard: Thanks so much for sharing these special QSL cards. Wow! I had never seen the first day card from WWV Fort Collins before–what a treasure you have there!

Radio Taiwan International seeks your memorabilia

Crosley-Dial

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, David Iurescia (LW4DAF), for sharing information about this initiative by Radio Taiwan International:

Radio Taiwan International began broadcasting in 1928. In an era when information did not travel as  quickly as today, RTI programs could be heard thousands of miles away by people like you.

If RTI has touched you in any way over the years, let us travel back in time together to look back at the voices, letters, and memorabilia of RTI’s history.

RTI invites you to take part in piecing together the history of RTI with any sounds and memorabilia you may have collected throughout the years. Your participation will help us commemorate RTI’s precious history.

[…]RTI is inviting listeners to lend/donate RTI memorabilia from 1928-1998, including QSL cards, sounds, and other items from the Central Broadcasting System, Voice of Free China, Voice of Asia, and the Broadcasting Corporation of China (BCC).

Items to be collected?

  • Sounds: Tapes of programs, news broadcasts, and records from the above stations can be sent or e-mailed to RTI.
  • Items: Station gifts to listeners, letters, QSL cards, pennants, and other souvenirs. Mailing the items is preferred. You can also send pictures of the items.
  • Historical pictures or videos related to RTI.

If material is received from the 1928-1982 period, and is perceived to have historical significance to the station, there will be the following feedback:

The official station site will list those who donated and the items donated.

  • RTI will send a thank you letter and souvenir.
  • If the item is from 1983 or later, RTI will send a nice souvenir to thank for the item.
  • If the donated item cannot be put in our archive, the station will send a thank you letter. (RTI reserves the right to make final decisions on the collection)

Full details about the archive initiative are available at Radio Taiwan International.

Radio Malaysia QSL Card

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Many thanks to SWLing Post reader,  Timm Breyel, who writes:

While browsing your site I noticed the QSL Gallery page. Interesting. I have many old QSLs from the 1960s and 1970s, all of which are stored away in the States, all except one. It’s a 40 year QSL from Radio Malaysia via Penang Island. The station was received in Denver, Colorado in 1975.

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It’s not the most attractive of QSLs, but it certainly is quite rare.

Timm, I love this QSL card and I have never seen one like it before. Thanks so much for sharing it with us!

Remembering Radio Canada International’s final shortwave broadcast

The transmitter building of Radio Canada International, Sackville, NB.

The transmitter building of Radio Canada International, Sackville, NB.

I spent the summer of 2012 in an off-grid cabin on the eastern coast of Prince Edward Island, Canada. That summer, I listened as two of my favorite shortwave broadcasters left the air within weeks of each other: Radio Netherlands Worldwide and Radio Canada International.

I was able to not only listen to the final broadcasts of Radio Netherlands, but also record them. I wrote a post about that memorable experience.

Ironically, though I was only a geographic stone’s-throw from the RCI Sackville transmitter site, I struggled to hear any Sackville signals as my location was too close for skywave propagation and a little too far for ground wave. Though I paid a visit to the transmitter site only two days prior, I was unable to hear or record RCI’s final broadcast.

Unlike RNW’s final broadcasts, RCI’s ended without fanfare and quite abruptly. This week, I heard a recording of that final RCI broadcast for the first time. My friend, Rajdeep Das, recorded it on June 24, 2012 in Kolkata, India. Rajdeep has kindly shared his recording with the Shortwave Radio Audio Archive and here on the SWLing Post.

This is a short 10 minute recording, beginning at 1550 UTC, June 24, 2012 on 11,675 kHz. Listeners will note that the broadcast ends abruptly during the mailbag program–obviously the Sackville transmitters were turned off prematurely.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

While we’re talking about RCI, I would also like to thank @LeedsRadio, @UKDXer and Al Holt for sharing the following brilliant QSLs and pennant:

UK-DXer-RCI-QSL

Source: @UKDXer via Twitter

LeedsRadio-RCI-NorthQuebecService-QSL

Source: @LeedsRadio via Twitter

Al-Holt-RCI-QSL

Source: @grovekid2 (Al Holt) via Twitter

 

Thanks for the stroll down memory lane!

SWLing Post readers should note that Rajdeep Das has a DX blog you should visit. I’ve added Rajdeep’s site to our blog roll. Thanks again, Rajdeep!

Daniel’s Deutsche Welle QSL card

SWLing Post reader, Daniel, writes:

“Hello Thomas: Attached is the latest QSL I received from Deutsche Welle – it is from their Kigali transmitter site.

Sent report via internet and received QSL in a few weeks:”

DW Kigali QSL CardIMG_0002

Thanks for sharing this, Daniel. I love the front of this DW QSL card–all of those gorgeous vintage tabletop radios!