Tag Archives: shortwave

Italian Broadcasting Corporation’s A17 schedule

(Source: Saverio Masetti on Facebook)

IBC – ITALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION – A17

We are proud to communicate the new schedule effective from 27 March 2017.
Following the requests of many listeners, we introduce a new 30 minutes weekly broadcast in English, to Europe and the Americas; at the end of every English broadcast there will be 5 minutes of “IBC DIGITAL” in MFSK32.

We wait for your reports and feedback to ibc@europe.com; you are also invited to visit our website www.ibcradio.webs.com to be constantly updated on our broadcast.

Good listening,
Saverio Masetti

ENGLISH:

WEDNESDAY 18.30-19 UTC 6070 / 1584 KHZ TO EUROPE
THURSDAY 02.30-03 UTC 1584 KHZ TO EUROPE
FRIDAY 01-01.30 UTC 9955 KHZ TO CENTRAL/SOUTH AMERICA
SATURDAY 01.30-02 UTC 11580 KHZ TO NORTH AMERICA 20-20.30 UTC 1584 KHZ TO SOUTH EUROPE
SUNDAY 00.30-01 UTC 7730 KHZ TO NORTH AMERICA 10.30-11 UTC 6070 KHZ TO EUROPE (VIA RADIO BCL NEWS)

“IBC DIGITAL” – IN MFSK32:
WEDNESDAY 18.55 UTC 6070 / 1584 KHZ TO EUROPE
THURSDAY 02.55 UTC 1584 KHZ TO EUROPE
FRIDAY 01.25 UTC 9955 KHZ TO CENTRAL/SOUTH AMERICA
SATURDAY 01.55 UTC 11580 KHZ TO NORTH AMERICA 20.25 UTC 1584 KHZ TO SOUTH EUROPE
SUNDAY 00.55 UTC 7730 KHZ TO NORTH AMERICA 10.55 UTC 6070 KHZ TO EUROPE (VIA RADIO BCL NEWS)

ITALIAN TO EUROPE:
WEDNESDAY 17-18.30 UTC 6070/1584 KHZ
THURSDAY 01-02.30 UTC 1584 KHZ
SATURDAY 13-14.00 UTC 6070 KHZ

IBC – ITALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
mail: ibc@europe.com
http://www.ibcradio.webs.com
FB: @ITALIANBROADCASTINGCORPORATION
TW: @RADIOIBC

ABC News: Portrait of a devoted shortwave radio listener

(Source: ABC News)

Saying goodbye to Radio Australia on the shortwave after 37 years

Kevin De Reus has lived in the same 24-kilometre-radius his whole life.

Born and raised in Iowa in the US, Kevin now calls his grandfather’s farm — just 12 kilometres from where he grew up in central Des Moines — home.

He is married, has five children and has worked at the same company for 20 years.

And while he admits he has not travelled much in his 52 years, it hasn’t stopped Kevin from listening to the news from Australia since 1980 — with the help of a shortwave radio.

Listening from the other side of the world

Even half a world away, he says the broadcast was one of the clearest of the stations he listened to.

“Radio Australia always held a special place in my heart just because it was in the South Pacific and I didn’t know much about that area — and the signal was always good from that part of the world,” he says.
“Most recently, over the last two to three years as I was listening in the morning hours here on 9.580, the signal was so good. It really was about the only English broadcaster at that time of the day that had news and information.

“Most mornings I would get up and turn on the shortwave radio at 7:00am (local time) and listen to the news from Australia and then I would drive to work.

“So many of the stations just aren’t on the air anymore. BBC doesn’t broadcast to North America anymore. I can’t even hardly hear the Voice of America in English anymore to tell you the truth. So Australia had the strongest signal.

“That’s why it was hard for me to hear [Radio Australia] was going to go off the air.”[…]

Click here to continue reading the full article on ABC News.

I believe Kevin De Reus did a fine job explaining the appeal of being a shortwave radio listener.

Though I gather a lot of international news these days with a WiFi radio (especially since Radio Australia left the shortwaves), I still prefer listening to shortwave.

It’s just how I’m wired.

More info about KIMF

KIMF transmitter site (Source: James Planck via Facebook)

KIMF transmitter building (Source: James Planck via Facebook)

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mike Barraclough, who writes:

Photos of the site were posted in December. Mauno Ritola posted in the WRTH Facebook group January 26 that “James Planck informs, that KIMF Battle Mountain NV, USA plans to start operation around 1st April on shortwave. Time will tell, if the plan is realistic.”

Click here to view photos on Facebook.

Many thanks, Mike, for sharing this info. Note that these Facebook photos are listed as public, so a Facebook account is not needed for viewing.

KIMF: A new shortwave broadcasting station in Nevada

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Tom Servo, who writes:

While going through the FCC Daily Digest for my own hobby website, I came across the International Authorizations section and happened to take a look today. To my surprise, a license to cover has been filed for HF station KIMF in Beowawe, NV! I can’t remember the last time a new HF station filed to go on the air in the US.

Do you know anything about this station? Here is a link to the FCC’s data page on the station; I’ve attached a PDF copy of the license form, which lists both the operating frequencies as well as times, power and modes they’ve asked for. It looks like they will run a combination of AM and USB across three frequencies.

[…]I went to the license coordinates to see if anything was visible on Google Satellite View, but it’s just empty desert. So I have no idea what’s really going on, but generally once a license to cover is filed, that means the station is built and ready to go on the air. At least in the world of AM, FM and TV broadcasting!

Here’s the frequencies/times/power/mode listed in the PDF, in case you can’t view it:

6065 kHz – 01-06 UTC 50 kW AM
9300 kHz – 08-12 UTC 100 kW USB
13570 kHz – 00-04 UTC 100 kW USB

Anyway, I figure you or one of the intrepid readers of your blog will have the scoop. Thanks for your time!

Click here to download the KIMF station license application (PDF).

Wow–many thanks, Tom! This filing catches me by surprise as well, but it does ring a bell. Perhaps an IMF representative contacted me in the past or I met someone from IMF at the Dayton Hamvention? I simply can’t remember.

Based on the application, IMF had to file for an extension due to several delays in building the transmitter site in Nevada. I’m guessing the Google satellite imagery was taken before site construction began.

It appears International Missions Fellowship (the parent organization who is filing this FCC application) currently operate the Radio Missiones International station in Tegucigalpa, Honduras on 3340 and 5010 kHz.

Here’s a note about the Nevada transmission site from the IMF website:

In the USA we have purchased a property near Battle Mountain, NV where we are working to build a powerful Shortwave Station which will be beamed at Mexico and Asia. It can be heard also in North America. We plan to build more stations after this. We have also just built a radio control center and small studio in Corona, CA to send programs to these transmitters via satellite/internet. It is now in operation. You can hear KIMF by clicking on the IMF Missionary Radio link below.

Listen to IMF Missionary Radio
Listen to Radio MI, Honduras

Post readers: Can anyone shed some more light on KIMF and this license to cover?  Please comment!

Vatican Radio’s English shortwave service to Asia ends

(Source: Vatican Radio via London Shortwave)

Vatican Radio’s English SW broadcast to Asia come to an end

Vatican Radio’s English shortwave broadcast for Asia has come to an end, with its last transmission going out Friday evening, after nearly 60 years of service.  However this does not mean it has disappeared altogether. What ultimately closed on March 24 as Vatican Radio’s English Service for Asia, is however very much alive online on Vatican Radio’s website.  The gradual phasing out of Vatican Radio’s shortwave frequencies is seen as part of the reform of the Roman Curia or the central administration of the Catholic Church here in the Vatican, called for by Pope Francis.  The Pope established the new dicastery or office of the Secretariat for Communications on June 27, 2015, ?bringing 9 media bodies of the Vatican, including Vatican Radio, under the Secretariat’s direction, with the purpose of overhauling, streamlining and ultimately merging them as a cohesive unit.

What ended on March 24 as Vatican Radio’s English Service for Asia began way back in 1958. The only ?English programme of Vatican Radio then, headed by Jesuit Father Thomas O’Donnell, was repeated a number of times in different directions, ?including towards Africa and South Asia.   It was a weekly 10-minute news broadcast  for India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.   However, the need for special programmes adapted to the ?distinctive cultural needs and tastes of Africa and South Asia gave way to independent programmes for ?these two regions.   ?In 1964 South Asia got a boost when Pope Paul VI visited Bombay (today Mumbai), India for the 38th International Eucharistic Congress from 2nd to 5th of December.  Hence in May 1965, the Indian Section officially came into being with a 10-minute broadcast twice a week each in the evening in Hindi, Tamil and Malayalam , while English went on air daily Monday through Saturday.   In 1982, all the four languages began re-broadcasting their evening programmes the following morning.   Three years later – on May 12, 1985, the Malayalam programme got extra airing time, broadcasting for 15 minutes in the morning, whereas the rest continued broadcasting for 10 minutes.

In 1986, Pope John Paul II visited India from January 31 to February 11.   Just prior to this visit, on January 7th that year, Hindi, Tamil and English were given extra time, and so all the four languages began broadcasting daily for 15 minutes each, in the morning, which was a feature programme.  The evening transmission consisted of 6 minutes of news only.   By the end of 1986 the evening 6-minute news increased to 10 minutes and was repeated the following morning.

On March 25, 1990, Hindi, Tamil Malayalam and English began broadcasting for 15 minutes each, repeating it the following morning.  And from Sept. 23, 1993, the four languages were transmitting for nearly 20 minutes each, repeating the evening programme twice the following morning.

It was on Oct 24, 1993 that the fifth language, Urdu, that is spoken mainly in Pakistan but is also widely followed in India, especially in the north, was added to the Indian Section.  It began with a 7-minute Sunday programme, as part of the Hindi programme.  On March 30, 2003 Urdu became a stand-alone programme, broadcasting for 15-minutes on Sundays and Wednesdays, and repeated the following mornings.  The Urdu programme however closed down in  September, 2013, after nearly 20 ?years of service.

On May 16, 2015, Vatican Radio marked the 50th anniversary of its Indian programmes with a ?Holy ?Mass and a reception.

Read this full article at Vatican Radio.