Missing Cities Mix

Aircraft-Jet-Boeing-VOLMET

Regular SWLing Post readers may recall a peculiar VOLMET recording I published in 2013 where all of the regional aviation weather was noted as “missing.”

My buddy, David Goren–you know, the fellow behind the Shortwave Shindig and Shortwaveology–gave me the original tip for that VOLMET broadcast.

David recently posted a new mix on Soundcloud. David’s description reads:

“So, a year or two ago Ryan Stively made an instrumental piece called Missing Cities and around the same time I recorded a chunk of shortwave sound that I called Missing Cities. When making some pieces for the recent Shortwave Shindig 2015 broadcast I decided the twain should meet.”

Readers: follow all of David’s shortwave mixes by bookmarking his website, Shortwaveology.net.

Shortwave Shindig Rebroadcast: March 7, 2015

ShindigLogoWhiteI’ve just learned via @shortwaveology that the Shortwave Shindig will be rebroadcast on Saturday March 7, 2015 from 10:00-11:00 PM EST (that’s Sunday from 0300-0400 UTC) via WRMI on 7,570 khz.

Those of you who tuned into the live show last Friday noted that the audio dropped out at times–this was due to a flaky Internet connection at the hotel where the ‘Shindig was held. You will hear the full show, without interruption, in this rebroadcast.

I plan to record this show, but would certainly appreciate other recordings as well to add to the archive. On that note, a few of you have sent recordings of the original broadcast (thank you!)–I will post those as soon as I’ve caught up with work, post-‘Fest!

Shortwave Shindig broadcasting live from the 2015 Winter SWL Fest!

ShindigLogoWhite

David Goren hosts the annual Shortwave Shindig

David Goren hosts the annual Shortwave Shindig

I’m happy to relay that David Goren’s Shortwave Shindig will once again broadcast live from the Winter SWL Fest in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania.

Tune in on Friday, February 27, 2015 from 22:00-23:00 EST (that’s 03:00-04:00 UTC, February 28) on 7,570 kHz.

Since I will be at the Winter SWL Fest and even a part of the Shortwave Shindig live broadcast, I’m hoping a few SWLing Post readers will record the show and share with us.

Also, if you’re in the Plymouth Meeting area, please consider joining us at the Winter SWL Fest.

If you would like to hear recordings of the Shortwave Shindig from 2014, click here.

Click here to check out David Goren’s website, Shortwaveology.net.

David Goren’s Cold War mix

ShortwaveologyFeeling nostalgic for the Cold War?  David Goren recently posted the following audio mix and description on his excellent website, Shortwaveology.net:

“This mashup of vintage cold war propaganda (mostly) from Radio Moscow’s North American Service was made for The Schizophonic Archive, a part of The Bureau of Memories: Archives and Ephemera, an exhibition curated by the anthropological collective Ethnographic Terminalia in December 2014. Thanks to Kim Andrew Elliot, Jack Widner, Marie Lamb, David Bodington, Jeff Place and Smithsonian Folkways for the recordings. Special thanks to Tom Miller and Ethnographic Terminalia.”

Readers: There are many more audio goodies at Shortwaveolog.net–go check’em out!

David Goren: The shortwave radio artist

I’ve always thought of my buddy, David Goren, as a shortwave radio artist–then, yesterday, I viewed this latest creation by the infamous Jeff Murray (K1NSS):
JeffMurray-DavidGoren-Shortwaveology
As I’ve said before, I’m completely in tune with Jeff’s sense of humor. If you are, too, be sure to bookmark Dashtoons for more radio fun and whimsy. (Better yet, get Jeff to design your own QSL card!)

As for Dave, follow Shortwaveology.net for the latest in shortwave radio artistry.

(Warning: he paints with a broad filter!)

One more week to get your Shindig T-shirt at a discount

ShindigLogoWhiteRemember our announcement about the Shortwave Shindig T-shirt?

David Goren has extended his 10% discount to SWLing Post readers for one more week!

Simply enter the promotional coupon code “swling” at checkout. Total cost will then be $18 shipped!

Click here to order your shirt today!

Numbers Stations in the news

towersThere have been a lot of numbers in the news lately.

Earlier this week, David Goren’s numbers station radio documentary was featured on the ABC Radio National show, Sounds Like Radio.

Click here to listen.

This morning, I also noticed this excellent BBC News Magazine piece on numbers stations, which includes an interview with Akin Fernandez, the creator of the Conet Project.

Here’s an excerpt from The spooky world of the ‘numbers stations’:

“This is the era of hyper-tech espionage, encrypted emails and mindboggling cryptography. But you can hear a very old-fashioned form of espionage on shortwave radio.

It is 13:03 on a Tuesday in a little crammed room of the BBC Monitoring building in Caversham and what is suddenly heard on a shortwave receiving station is a 10-minute message in Morse code.

There is a small community of aficionados who believe messages like this are a throwback to the era of Cold War espionage. They are the mysterious “numbers stations”.

At the apex of the Cold War, radio lovers across the globe started to notice bizarre broadcasts on the airwaves. Starting with a weird melody or the sound of several beeps, these transmissions might be followed by the unnerving sound of a strange woman’s voice counting in German or the creepy voice of a child reciting letters in English.

[…]Times have changed and technology has evolved, but there’s evidence that this old-fashioned seeming method of communication might still be used. Shortwave numbers stations might seem low-tech but they probably remain the best option for transmitting information to agents in the field, some espionage experts suggest.

“Nobody has found a more convenient and expedient way of communicating with an agent,” says Rupert Allason, an author specialising in espionage issues and writing under the pen name Nigel West.

“Their sole purpose is for intelligence agencies to communicate with their agents in denied areas – a territory where it is difficult to use a consensual form of communications,” Allason says.

A former GCHQ officer, who does not wish to be named, whose duty was to intercept signals towards the UK and search for these numbers stations in the 1980s is also adamant that these were broadcasts to agents in the field or in residencies or directed to embassies.

It was “one-way traffic” – the transmitters broadcast numbers to the recipient. The recipient did not reply.”

[…]”This system is completely secure because the messages can’t be tracked, the recipient could be anywhere,” says Akin Fernandez, the creator of the Conet Project – a comprehensive archive of the phenomenon of numbers stations. “It is easy. You just send the spies to a country and get them to buy a radio. They know where to tune and when,” he says.

Continue reading on the BBC Magazine website…

If you would like to know more about numbers stations, click here to read other numbers posts.

Click here to go to David’s website, Shortwaveology.net.