Tag Archives: Videos

The Great War: A look at WWI communications

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mike, who shares the following from the YouTube channel The Great War.

This short video gives an excellent overview of communications methods and equipment used throughout World War I. I’ve included the video’s description below:

Click here to view on YouTube.

“If one thing was vital to the the new kind of modern warfare in the First World War, it was communications. The Industrial Revolution had brought wireless transmission of signals with it and the huge armies of World War 1 needed to be in contact constantly to be successful in the field. In this special episode we introduce you to the birth hour of modern military communication and signals.”

Thanks again, Mike! I’ll subscribe to The Great War channel on YouTube.

The Great War Project

If you enjoy reading about WWI history, I would also highly recommend following The Great War Project blog.

The Great War Project follows WWI as it unfolded 100 years ago. It’s an absolute treasure trove of information and brilliantly written.

Video: Gary DeBock’s “Baby FSL” antenna

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Gary DeBock (N7EKX), who shares this video and notes the following on YouTube:

This is the new 3.5 inch (89mm) “Baby FSL” antenna, designed to provide a powerful DXing gain boost for Ultralight radios (or any other portables) despite its very small size. It has 32 Russian surplus 140mm x 8mm ferrite rods and 31 turns of 1162/46 Litz wire. In the demonstration video it provides a daytime DX gain boost for 750-KXTG (Tigard, Oregon, 50 kW at 160 miles) from inaudible up to about S7 on the Eton Traveler III Ultralight radio.

Click here to view on YouTube.

Gary is certainly a first-rate DXer and an ambassador of our radio hobby. Gary shows us here that, with a little ingenuity, we can take a $50 radio and turn it into something exceptional! Homebrewing at its best.  Thank you, Gary!

Also, I had never considered that a high-gain FSL antenna would require very precise placement of the receiver for proper inductive coupling. It makes sense, though. This loop is tuned for razor-sharp precision!

Some day, when I have a little free time, I’m going to build one of Gary’s FSL designs.

Mr. Carlson restores and repairs a Hammarlund HQ-140-X

hammarlund-hq-140xMany thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Moshe, who writes:

Hi Thomas!
You must see this restoration job from Mr. Carlson’s lab:

Click here to view on YouTube.

Thank you for sharing this video, Moshe!  I truly enjoy watching Paul’s videos–no doubt, any radio turned over to him is in expert hands. I love how he explains, in such detail, each action he takes to restore and repair these vintage radios.

Click here to view Mr. Carlson’s YouTube channel.

SDRuno tutorial videos

SDRuno running the RSP2.

SDRuno running the RSP2.

Jon Hudson with SDRplay recently noted the following tutorial videos in an SDRplay discussion forum. Since I’m also trying to learn the ropes of SDRuno, I thought I’d share this here on the SWLing Post.

Jon notes:

These video guides are very helpful for newcomers to SDRuno and the RSP1 or RSP2:
RSP1: https://youtu.be/xBGHB0oMXHU

RSP2: https://youtu.be/92Ijh_NAEfc

Especially when used in conjunction with the SDRuno Cookbook from Paul and Mike: https://www.nn4f.com/SDRuno-cookbook.pdf

Video: Five shortwave stations in two minutes

danh-sangean-ats-909xMany thanks to SWLing Post contributor, DanH, who shares the following feedback.

Note that he sent this to me about two weeks ago, but my life has been so busy the past few weeks, I’m still catching up on email. Thanks to everyone for understanding!

DanH writes:

We all know how hard it is to get good SW reception without a decent antenna at this point in the 11-year solar cycle. But, the past couple of days have offered good propagation conditions for reception here in Northern California. Here is a video I made this evening during the 8:00 p.m. hour, 10-11-2016 PDT (0300 hour, 10-12-2016 UTC). It isn’t all that bad. Here are five stations in under two minutes (but really, WWV doesn’t count). There is plenty to listen to. Voice of Greece is in the Greek language with great music. The other stations are broadcast in the English language.

Click here to view on YouTube.

Thank you for sharing, Dan! Wow–RNZI is quite a strong catch at your location! It’s so nice when conditions improve and that elusive DX pops out of the niose. At this point in the solar cycle, we just take what we can get!

Only last night, I was amazed with the Voice of Greece here on the east coast. Even as propagation conditions deteriorated, VOG held on at S9 +20db via my Elecraft KX3.