Tag Archives: Videos

Court of Dreams: How shortwave radio lead to a lifelong obsession with tennis

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Dan Robinson, who shares the following video from CBS Sunday Morning and notes:

For those who may have missed this recent CBS Sunday Morning piece, which tells the story of a guy who, inspired by BBC broadcasts of Wimbledon, built his own top-level court in Iowa. It’s not often that shortwave gets such national exposure:

(Via CBS Sunday Morning on YouTube)

“If you build it, they will come.” In the case of one tennis-obsessed fan who built a replica of Wimbledon’s center court on his Iowa farm, people have come from around the world to his All-Iowa Lawn Tennis Club, to play on his court of dreams. Steve Hartman reports.

Click here to view on YouTube.

This absolutely made my day, Dan!  Thank you for sharing.

Video tour of the E-4B NAOC Doomsday Plane

An Air Force E-4B National Airborne Operations Center aircraft sits at the international airport in Bogota,Colombia Oct. 3, waiting for Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates. U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Jerry Morrison)

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Jason Whiteley, who shares a video tour of the E-4B NAOC Doomsday Plane and notes:

This is a pretty interesting video of the inside of the flying Pentagon or Doomsday Plane. There is a lot of radio equipment on board including a radio antenna that can fly out of the back of the plane:

Click here to view on YouTube.

This is very cool, Jason! It’s amazing how much technology they’ve crammed into this Boeing 747-200. The 747 is a large aircraft, but when loaded with so much technology and support staff, there’s no room to spare.

With a video this detailed in the public domain, I can’t help but think there may already be a replacement for the E-4B.

Thanks for sharing!

Video: Air traffic on the HF bands

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Dan Hawkins, who writes:

Air traffic bands on VHF is well-known.

Not so well-known are the shortwave (HF) communications networks that must be operated by transoceanic flights.

This is an ARINC station for San Francisco, California. I am located about 70 miles inland from this station. I assume ARINC is using a directional antenna system beamed westward toward the Pacific Ocean.

I recorded this video of an ARINC station late last night for my YouTube channel.

Click here to view on YouTube.

Many thanks, Dan!

I enjoy monitoring air traffic on VHF and often forget that when I’m outside the range of an airport’s tower, I can still hop on HF and often hear international traffic. Thanks again!

The SDRplay RSP2 on Linux: a step-by-step guide

The SDRplay RSP2

Many thanks to Jon Hudson with SDRplay who recently shared the following video by Kevin Loughin which details the installation and operation of of the RSP2 on Linux. Kevin has written scripts that make the installation process more accessible to those not as familiar with Linux.

According to Kevin, this will run on Ubuntu 16.04 and other Debian-based Linux distributions.

Check out Kevin’s video below (or on YouTube). Kevin also published a step-by-step guide on his blog.

Click here to view on YouTube.

Click here to read step-by-step instructions on Kevin’s blog.

Video: Juan touts Panasonic RF-2200 performance & filter shapes

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Juan Pablo Carlino, who writes:

Hi. I own one RF-2200 after buying it in eBay in March 2008. Since then it became my favourite portable radio and as everybody [has commented], its a pleasure to hear MW with it.

I explain this due to the fact that it has a good rotative ferrite antenna and also because the narrow and wide filters have a suitable shape for MW: at least in my country each MW is spaced from the other by 10 KHz, so you don’t need a very sharp filter. The narrow one is not so narrow, just enough to attenuate maybe 6 db the splatter from the louder station and not loosing audio quality.

When you tune around you have the impression that the filter shape suites perfectly for MW, making the audio quality very pleasant. I would never sell it. If you are interested i’ve captured a short clip while playing with it outdoor on 7 MHz band, hearing ham stations on AM, SSB and CW.

Pay attention to how loud and clear i was hearing stations at 400 Km in AM:

Click here to view on YouTube.

Many thanks for sharing your thoughts, Juan!

I agree with you completely. At least here in countries where MW stations are spaced at 10 kHz, I find the RF-2200 a mediumwave DX boss!

I’m constantly amazed with the RF-2200’s MW sensitivity and selectivity–and low noise floor. That combo, along with the filter shapes Juan mentions and the excellent built-in full-fidelity speaker make for a proper listening experience.

As I’ve said before, the RF-2200 is a radio with fortitude and purpose.

The only place I’ve ever really searched for an RF-2200 is eBay. I like eBay, because if you receive a faulty unit, you can typically return it or have some sort of recourse (as long as the seller accepts returns).

I would only buy an RF-2200 (or any vintage solid-state rigs) from a seller that has near 100% ratings with a number of radio sales in their past.  That is, if you’re seeking a working unit.

Though the RF-2200 is vintage and thus might eventually need repair. It’s ultimately reparable by a skilled technician, though.  My buddy Vlado, for example, has repaired 2200s in the past–indeed, we cracked my RF-2200 open a few months ago to clean contacts.

Panasonic RF-2200s typically cost between $175-300 for one that’s mechanically and cosmetically sound. Of course, NOS units go for much more and units with faults sell for much less.

I expect my RF-2200 will outlast me!

Click here to search for RF-2200s on eBay.