Updates to the WRTH Summer A12 schedules are now available for download

The World Radio TV Handbook (WRTH) has updates their A12 International Radio Supplement as of July 13. The file is now available to download, free of charge, from the WRTH website. This is a comprehensive update and supplement to the printed 2012 WRTH.

Updates to the WRTH Summer A12 schedules are now available for download

The World Radio TV Handbook (WRTH) A12 schedules updates file is now available to download, free of charge, from the WRTH website. This is a comprehensive update and supplement to the printed 2012 WRTH.

(Source: Sean Gilbert, WRTH)

The WRTH Editorial team is pleased to announce that the Summer/’A’ season broadcasting schedules file is now available to download, free of charge, from the WRTH website – click on http://www.wrth.com/ and follow the link “Latest PDF Updates”.

The file is in PDF format (you will require the free Adobe Acrobat reader to open this file. If you do not have the Acrobat reader, please visit http://www.abobe.com/ to download and install it). The 86 page file is approximately 4500kB in size and contains the following information:

Summer / ‘A’ Season broadcasting schedules for over 200 international and Clandestine/Target stations;

Frequency listing of the above stations to facilitate band scanning;

Broadcasts in English, French, German, Portuguese and Spanish;

International DRM broadcasts.

Please feel free to pass this information on so that we may reach as many SWL’s, DX-er’s and professionals as possible.

For contact details, transmitter sites and much more, please refer to the printed WRTH, which is available to order from the website.

We hope you find this a useful accompaniment to the printed WRTH.

On behalf of the publisher and editorial team at WRTH, happy listening!

73,
Sean D. Gilbert,
International Editor – WRTH (World Radio TV Handbook)

World Radio TV Handbook 2012 contest

This beautiful book could be yours!

UPDATE: This contest is now closed and the winner will be announced soon. Thank you so much to all who participated! We will do more contests in the future as we occasionally have extra shortwave radio supplies/books. We’re thinking of “name that interval signal” contests and other fun events. If you have any suggestions, or if you are a retailer who would like to contribute a prize, please contact us.  Thanks!  -Thomas

We just so happen to have an extra copy of the 2012 WRTH (World Radio and TV Handbook) here at the SWLing Post HQ.  So, we’ve decided it would be fun to share it with a SWLing Post reader who would like a copy of this excellent resource–which also happens to be a great read, featuring many articles that we’re sure you’ll enjoy.

And since the SWLing Post recently opened a Facebook account, this little contest will be a great way to spark some interest there.

How can you win?  Simply “like” us on Facebook–before 12:00 UTC on April 11, 2012–and you will automatically be entered to win the 2012 WRTH. We’ll pick a reader at random and notify the winner via Facebook.

Then, simply send us your postal address, and we’ll pop this in the mail to you. And though we may regret the postage (this is a heavy book!) this contest  is open to anyone on the planet!

If you’re not familiar with the newest edition of the WRTH, check out our recent review.

Click here to go to our Facebook page now!

Updates to the WRTH B11 schedules are now available for download

The World Radio TV Handbook (WRTH) B11 schedules updates file is now available to download, free of charge, from the WRTH website. This is a comprehensive update and supplement to the printed 2012 WRTH.

2012 WRTH: A Look Inside

I just received my eagerly-anticipated copy of the 2012 WRTH directly from the publisher and, as ever, jumped right into their articles and reviews.

Like many radio listeners, I always look forward to the newest edition of the WRTH. It takes its rightful place at arm’s length next to my main receiver. Even though I use online frequency guides, I find they generally lack the detail and foresight that WRTH delivers.  And much more than just a listing of frequencies, WRTH’s radio reviews, feature articles, and HF report make for excellent reading.

On that note–this year, WRTH reviews several noteworthy shortwave receivers: the Alinco DX-R8E (the European version of the DX-R8T which we reviewed), the Reuter Elektronic RDR54C, WinRadio Excalibur Pro, Sangean ATS-909X and the Tecsun PL-660. They also take a look at the very affordable Pappradio DRM SDR receiver. The WRTH review mix always covers the receiver spectrum, from portables to professional, tabletops to SDRs.

The 2012 WRTH edition also gives a simple primer on the terminology and techniques used for evaluating receiver performance–e.g., sensitivity, selectivity, dynamic range, etc.–a worthy reference for anyone who routinely reads radio reviews.

I always enjoy their human-interest articles as well. In this edition they take us to the remote–I should say, most remote–Atlantic island, Tristan da Cunha; report on radio’s involvement (or lack of it) in the “Arab Spring;” and visit our good friends at Radio Bulgaria.

But, of course, the reason we all buy WRTH is for their in-depth comprehensive radio schedules for the upcoming year. How comprehensive are they? Check out the results from the annual comparative analysis of WRTH vs competitor guide Klingenfuss at the end of this post. Personally I can’t do without my WRTH–as I’ve often said, this indispensable go-to reference guide is the source for my shortwave listening fare.

Purchase your copy of WRTH directly from WRTH’s publishers, or from a distributor like Universal Radio (US) or Radio HF (Canada).

If you’re new to WRTH, note that they regularly update changes to their schedules throughout the year:  go to their website to download these updates.

If you would like to know more about using WRTH’s schedules, please see one of our previous posts.

How does WRTH compare with other frequency listings? Sean Gilbert posted the following on WRTH’s Facebook page:

The annual comparative analysis of WRTH vs Klingenfuss has just been published. I am pleased to announce that, once again, WRTH has proved more accurate and comprehensive than the Super Frequency List as regards Shortwave broadcasting (which is the area this study concentrates on). Overall we scored 98.4%, compared to the SFL which scored 97.6%. Breaking this down out of a possible 125 points for international broadcasting, we scored 124, whereas SFL scored 120. For domestic broadcasting, WRTH scored 122/125 and SFL scored 124/125, so the SFL just has the edge. This is caused by WRTH not including the full schedule for some of the tropical band stations in SAm. Here is a comment extracted from the report:
——-
“I still consider it useful, if the Handbooks also can provide the DX-er with additional information about Geographical Coordi-nates for his propagation calculations and Google Earth search, and ID in the language heard. Furthermore it is necessary to know current addresses (postal, e-mail and web) and QSL-policy for his reception report writing. For listeners with Broadband internet (ATDL) is it also useful to know, if the station broadcasts live audio on the web.

Most of these useful details can be found in the WRTH, but they are still missing completely in the SWFG !

The Handbooks are very useful for the DX-er and ordinary shortwave listener and are at a very high accuracy level and can hardly be much better!”
———
This fantastic result is down to the extremely hard work and dedication of all our country editors, contributors, monitors and, of course, the 3 main international sub editors who gather the majority of the information for the section. Without their enormous knowledge and skill, the section would not be what it is today. Finally we must not forget the publisher who has, amongst many other things, the unenviable job of doing the final setting and making it all fit into the available space – more difficult than it sounds, believe me!!

[…]Best wishes and regards,

Sean Gilbert – International Editor.