Tag Archives: WWV

WWV seeking reception reports of 25 MHz broadcast

WWV’s transmitter building in Fort Collins, Colorado (2014)

(Source: WWV)

Current 25 MHz Broadcast Specifications

As of 2042 UTC 7 July 2017 the 25 MHz broadcast is now on a turnstile antenna with circular polarization and will remain in this configuration until after the solar eclipse on 21 Aug 2017.  Signal reports are requested.

Schedule: typically continuous. As an experimental broadcast, the 25 MHz signal may be interrupted or suspended without notice.

Radiated Power: 2.0 kW

Antenna: Experimental Turnstile

Listener comments and reception reports may be emailed to: wwv@nist.gov (link sends e-mail), or sent via postal mail to:

National Institute of Standards and Technology
Radio Station WWV
2000 E. County Rd. 58
Fort Collins, CO 80524

Note that the 25 MHz signal has traditionally used a vertically-polarized antenna and for about one year (between 2014-2015) with a discone antenna.

Please share your report with WWV–contact info above!

WWV Scheduled Broadcast Outage February 21 & 22

(Source: WWV)

NOTICE OF SCHEDULED BROADCAST OUTAGE:

Due to an electrical upgrade, Radio Station WWV will be off the air on all frequencies on February 21 and 22, 2017. The outages will occur between 7:00 AM and 5:00 PM Mountain Standard Time, and will not exceed 8 hours duration each day.

I’m not sure that I’ll be around to do this, but it might be fun trying to record the moment the outage occurs and the moment it recommences.

Leap second added to 2016

(Source: NPR)

Here’s a timely reminder for all you would-be revelers out there: Be careful with your countdowns this New Year’s Eve. There will be a little extra time to bask in the glow of a retreating 2016 — or curse its name, as the case may be.

Whatever your inclination may be, one thing is certain: Before the year is out, the world’s foremost authority on time will be adding one more second to the clock.

In a bulletin released this summer, the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service, or IERS, said it would be necessary to introduce a “leap second” at the end of December. Timekeepers use this added second much as leap years are used — to bring the world’s atomic clocks in sync with the Earth’s own distinctive rhythm, which in this case is determined by its rotation.

This leap second isn’t the first. Since 1971, the world has added leap seconds with some regularity — typically every two to three years — and the latest leap second was added only last year, in June.

Continue reading at NPR…

Last year, I recorded the 2015 Leap Second via WWV–click here to read that post. Though such a subtle change, it is fun to hear that extra second added. I plan to record the full 31 meter band New Year’s Eve–hopefully, I’ll also catch the 10,000 kHz WWV Leap Second!

Paul discovers Firedrake in an unexpected place

(Photo: Satdirectory.com)

(Photo: Satdirectory.com)

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Paul Walker, who writes:

From time to time, I get some interesting shortwave catches here in Alaska.

Sometimes on 10 MHz, I get WWV. Sometimes I get WWVH. Sometimes I get BPM China. And from time to time, I’ve heard all three at once.

Well this clip is something a bit different…

From April 20, 2016 at 1707 UTC here is my Tecsun PL880 connected to a 225 foot long wire with audio set at 3.5 kHz while tuned to 10,000 kHz (10 MHz).

This time, I am hearing WWVH Hawaii and […] the Chinese Firedrake jammer. What’s happening is Firedrake is jamming the Sound of Hope on 10005 kHz and the signal is so wide, it’s [competing with] WWVH.

I am making no adjustments to the dial tuning or audio settings as this happens. Listen to how things fade in and out.

Click here to view on YouTube.

Star Wars sound designer is, indeed, a radio enthusiast

StarWars-LogoSWLing Post readers may remember a post I recently published in which I believed I’d identified a familiar shortwave time signal station in the Battle of Hoth scene from The Empire Strikes Back. If you haven’t read this post, feel free to do so and listen to the embedded video/audio clips.

Upon hearing this, I went so far as to muse that the Star Wars sound designer might be a radio listener. I asked our readers if anyone could confirm this–?

Well, we’ve got our answer!  I’m truly indebted to an SWLing Post reader who passed my post along to his friend, Ben, who could provide this definitive response:

“This is Ben Burtt, sound designer of the Star Wars films. A friend sent me a link to this blog thinking I would like to comment.

Ben and old recorders

Ben Burtt with his recording gear, circa 1980. The mike on the stand at Ben’s feet is one from his grandfather’s ham radio station in the 1950s, or possibly earlier.

“The answer is yes, I have always been a ham radio enthusiast.”

 

“My grandfather, Harold Burtt, operated W8CD out of his home in Columbus, Ohio 1930s-1960s. I was enthralled as a kid listening to the sounds on his receiver. I heard alien worlds and cosmic ‘voices.’

Harold Burtt, (Chairman of the Psychology Dept Ohio State) with his attic gear approximately 1935

Harold Burtt, W8CD. (Chairman of the Psychology Dept Ohio State) with his attic gear,  approximately 1935

“So not only did I record his radio, but continued to do so on the Star Wars series and Star Trek as well.

My memory of the Hoth transmission was that it was WWV but it could have been CHU since I was recording all that interested me on the dial.”

Terrific! Thank you, Ben, for taking the time to respond. As I said, you’ve certainly started off this radio enthusiast’s year on the right wavelength…no doubt some of our readers will agree.

Indeed, the powerful sonic experience of the Star Wars and Star Trek films has, in my estimation, helped shape many of us into the radio/sound enthusiasts we’ve become–myself certainly included. Thank you, Ben, for this!  You’ve sharpened my ear to a greater appreciation of sound, especially filmic sound, and your work in particular.    

For readers who are less familiar with Ben Burtt’s work, check out his Wikipedia page and IMDB profile–you’ll find he’s been the sound designer on numerous influential films including the recently released Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

A special thanks to Ben Burtt for sharing these wonderful photos and kindly giving me permission to use them here on the SWLing Post.  I must say, considering my love of radio in the thirties, I especially like that photo of Harold Burtt (W8CD) in his shack.