Solid copy: Tom receives JG2XA in the Netherlands on his PL-365

CountyComm GP5/SSB, aka Tecsun PL-to 365

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Tom Kamp (PA/DF5JL), who shares the following brief report and video:

Today (September 21, 2022) around 2015 UT strong signal on 5006 kHz (CF) from JG2XA beacon from Japan (0.2 kW) near Den Helder, in North-Holland, The Netherlands.

JG2XA transmits continuously at 200 W on 5006 kHz and 8006 kHz. The type of radio signal is H2A (amplitude modulation with coded tones in the single sideband).

Received with the Tecsun PL-368 and the built-in telescopic antenna! The dBm display of the unit is very inaccurate (in USB), yet S5-S7 should be rated appropriately. Top signal, top RX ?

73 Tom Kamp PA/DF5JL

That’s quite a catch for the PL-365. Thanks for sharing this, Tom!

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9 thoughts on “Solid copy: Tom receives JG2XA in the Netherlands on his PL-365

  1. Tom DF5JL

    It would have been so nice ? Unfortunately, some Polish station has hijacked the two frequencies of JG2XA and led me around by the nose. Lengthy locating attempts using TDoA yielded this disappointing result. Annoying. Sorry 🙁

    Reply
  2. Tom DF5JL

    It would have been so nice ? Unfortunately, some Polish station has hijacked the two frequencies of JG2XA and led me around by the nose. Lengthy locating attempts using TDoA yielded this disappointing result. Annoying. Sorry 🙁

    Reply
  3. Frank

    I love beacons and also the shortwave miracle that rather suddenly and suprisingly you can receive them with no patricular sophsticated instruments when “Mother Nature” is favoring you.
    I love that they are weak-signal and the fact that reception simply works.
    When I find a contact email from an amateur radio beacon, I like to send a SWL reception report.
    Best 73!

    Reply
  4. Hank Michalenka, CPA

    I note the receiver was tuned to 5005 kHz on the video. Is this due to the transmission method, or was it not the Japanese station?

    Reply
    1. Alexander, DL4NO

      That is completely correct: An SSB receiver shows the frequency of the suppressed carrier of the signal. If you receive a carrier and set the frequency 1 kHz below or above the signal, the carrier can be heard as a 1 kHz signal.

      Reply
  5. Alexander, DL4NO

    There was a time when I drove in my car at night, even during the winter. Quite often I could hear Japanese radio amateurs in CW on 40 m with an 1.7 m long antenna and my FT-857.

    Or read reports from the early 1920s when radio amateurs made the first intercontinental shortwave contacts: They started in the 160 m band.

    Everything is easy if two conditions are met: Good antenna at the transmitter and low noise at the receiving end. A good antenna at the receiving end is not necessarily needed: The natural noise is easily much louder that the internal receiver noise. You only need a reasonable signal/noise ratio.

    Reply

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