Tag Archives: Southgate ARC

BBC MW stations in Lincolnshire and Nottingham to close

(Source: Southgate ARC)

More BBC AM transmitters to close

On the British DX Club (BDXC) Yahoo Group Nick Buxton reports that BBC AM stations in Lincolnshire and Nottingham are to close

In his post Nick says:

In an e-mail reply today (29/11) from Andy Roche, BBC R. Lincolnshire’s Acting Programme Editor, he says 1368 kHz will cease broadcasting their programmes on 6 January 2018. It will continue until 28 January 2018 running a continuous loop advising re-tune to FM/DAB. They will shortly be running a campaign to let people know.

In a very brief e-mail reply from BBC Radio Nottingham, enquiring about closure of their 1584 kHz service, they advise “No transmission from late December. Re-tune now”

No reply received from BBC R. Humberside concerning their 1485 kHz transmitter….

British DX Club (BDXC)
http://bdxc.org.uk/
https://groups.yahoo.com/group/BDXC-News

SDR pioneer Dr. Vanu Bose dies at 52

Photo credit: Vanu Inc.

(Source: Southgate ARC)

Software Defined Radio pioneer Dr. Vanu Gopal Bose passed away on November 11, 2017 aged 52

In 1998 he founded Vanu Inc. which pioneered the commercialization of software-defined radio and was the first company to receive FCC certification of a software-defined radio in 2004.

The firm’s technology, which grew out of Bose’s graduate research at MIT, increases the role of software in operating the radio-based component of wireless communications networks, including those used for cellphone communications.

His company had recently deployed over 40 Community Connect base stations in Puerto Rico to provide cellular service in the wake of two devastating hurricanes.

Read the Boston Globe story
http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/11/12/vanu-bose-pioneer-cellular-wireless-infrastructure-dies/mK9MjcOEiuPIOovhCGUHFJ/story.html

“Virtual Radios” by Vanu Gopal Bose, et al 1998. One of the original MIT SpectrumWare papers
https://archive.org/download/VirtualRadios/VirtualRadios-VanuBose.pdf

2003 Guardian newspaper article Radio active revolution
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2003/jul/10/onlinesupplement2

Connecting the last billion
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/609009/connecting-the-last-billion/

Changes to Iceland’s ham radio call sign configuration

(Source: Southgate ARC)

Iceland plans to end ham radio call sign discrimination

On November 9, 2017 Iceland’s Ministry of Transport and Local Government has published draft changes to the Radio Regulations for comment

The national society, Icelandic Radio Amateurs (IRA), had proposed ending the practice of highlighting amateurs who had Novice call signs, an N was added to their call sign. In addition the IRA proposed ending another discriminatory practice where Icelandic call signs reflected the geographic call area where a station is located.

The Post and Telecom Administration’s new draft Radio Regulations incorporate the IRA’s requests and the frequency allocation table has been updated to include the 630m and 60m bands.

Read the Icelandic Radio Amateur article in Google English at
http://tinyurl.com/IcelandIRA

Draft amendment with new frequency table
https://www.stjornarradid.is/lisalib/getfile.aspx?itemid=a0bf8794-c538-11e7-941e-005056bc4d74

The old frequency table is at
https://www.reglugerd.is/reglugerdir/allar/nr/348-2004

Radio Caroline testing on 648 kHz

(Source: Southgate ARC via Mike Terry)

Caroline 648 testing

A test signal with continuous music and announcements reported today.

Reception reports on Facebook from the UK, Holland, Belgium, France and Austria.

Some reports from mainland Europe refer to a co-channel Romanian or Slovenian station.

I think this is at a lower power than the permitted 1 KW.

Much excitement in anorak circles!

Note that if you’re interesting in monitoring 648 kHz but live outside the broadcast footprint, you can easily listen and record via the U Twente WebSDR.

Crosley biographer to speak at National VOA Museum of Broadcasting

(Source: Southgate ARC)

Best-selling Crosley biographer to speak at National VOA Museum of Broadcasting Nov. 10

Rusty McClure, author of the New York Times bestseller, Crosley: Two Brothers and a Business Empire that Transformed a Nation, will speak Friday, Nov. 10 at the National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting in West Chester.

Cost to attend is $25, which includes a copy of McClure’s book, a $15 value. Attendees can also view the ongoing Crosley exhibit at the museum, which displays some of Crosley’s most engaging inventions and products. Doors open at 7 p.m., with the lecture beginning at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are payable at the door.

To reserve a place at the Nov. 10 lecture, call (513) 777-0027 or email admin@voamuseum.org .

McClure will also be on hand at the museum on Saturday, Nov. 11 at 1 p.m. to discuss Powel and Lewis Crosley’s extraordinary lives and work and sign books, said museum director Jack Dominic.

Powel Crosley, Jr., inventor, industrialist, entrepreneur and founder of the Crosley Corporation, is considered the Henry Ford of radio. When his son wanted a radio in the early 1920s, he thought they were too expensive, so built one with him instead.

Blast from the past: The Shelvador refrigerator, which featured shelves and a built-in AM radio in the door, is one of the fun and innovative Crosley products on display at the National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting. (John Kiesewetter Photo)
The Crosley Radio Corporation that resulted from that innovation quickly became the largest radio manufacturer in the world.

Crosley and his brother Lewis built a business empire that included WLW radio station, the concept of radio advertising, ownership of the Cincinnati Reds, the creation of many household products, and an economy automobile known as the Crosley car. Crosley Corporation engineers built the rhombic antennas at the VOA-Bethany Station and operated it during World War II and part of the Cold War.

An exhibit featuring Crosley products such as the Shelvador refrigerator; a “Reado,” home Fax machine; and Xervac hair-growing machine is free with regular museum admission.

The VOA museum is now open each Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and $1 for children.

The museum, located at 8070 Tylersville Road, just commemorated the Sept. 23, 1944 dedication of the VOA-Bethany Station with a successful fundraising gala. This year also marks the 75th anniversary of the Voice of America.

For 50 years, the VOA-Bethany Station transmitted Voice of America broadcasts to countries worldwide that lacked a free press, first in Europe during World War II and to South America during the Cold War. The station was decommissioned by the federal government in 1994.