Tag Archives: shortwave

Radio Northern Europe International Show #19 announcement

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Roseanna, with Radio Northern Europe International who shares the following announcement:


Hei alle sammen,

We’ve been continuing to write your QSL cards and we’re now sending them within 2 months of receipt of your emails!

Just like the last few months, we’ve split the broadcasts into 3 versions;
• WRMI & On-Demand Version: RNEI 19 + RNEIxtra (Mammas Mest Metal & Stephen’s feature) + HamDRM.
• Channel 292 & Radio Onda version: RNEI 19 + HamDRM + This is an Express Music Show.
• World FM version: RNEI 19 only.

RNEI #19 is packed full of great music including:
• The show starting with some Icelandic Rock
• Cindy Chiche
• A really pretty song from Døssi
• Spooky vibes in our traditional pick from Gyda
• Scandipop.co.uk‘s fantastic song of the month that has some Sámi Lyrics!
• Some MFSK64 embedded in two parts of our dance mix at the end of the dance mix!

The 4th show of Mamma’s Mest Metal will bring some amazing symphonic metal this month, it’s an amazing genre and some of Mamma’s picks this month are fantastic!
Stephen is bringing us a feature on the Scottish artist Julie Fowlis with some really beautiful songs and, lastly, YH brings us another fantastic episode of This is an Express Music Show.

Daz has coded some HamDRM data for you to have a go at decoding too!
You can use EasyDRF, Easypal & WinDRM on Windows (or Wine in Linux) and QSSTV & TRXAMADRM on Linux. We recommend against Easypal due to some security flaws we’ve noticed and WinDRM because it’s an older version of EasyDRF.

We have found that 158° has a good signal in South Eastern and Northern Europe, 80° has a signal in Brazil and surrounding areas as well as Portugal & Spain and 332° is good between Ukraine and Italy. These happen because there is some backbeam with these directional antennas so give them a go and see what happens!
Also keep an eye on our announcements for extra broadcasts!

If you miss the show you can always catch up on demand and, if you prefer to only hear our music, we have Spotify Playlists of each show usually published after the first broadcast!

Wishing you well,
Roseanna

Click here to read this post at the RNEI website.

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Indy 500 Week Marks the Second W9IMS Special Event of 2021

Indy 500 Week Marks the Second W9IMS Special Event of 2021

By Brian D. Smith, W9IND

If you’re looking to add a 2021 Indy 500 QSL card to your collection, and perhaps a certificate as well, your odds of success just accelerated. From now through the end of Sunday, May 30 (Race Day), the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Amateur Radio Club will take to the airwaves with special event station W9IMS.

The station’s SSB signals will appear daily on 20 and 40 meters – usually on or around 7.245 and 14.245 MHz – and possibly on 80 meters (near 3.840 MHz) later in the evening.

The Indy 500 special event is the second of three W9IMS operations commemorating the major races at the Speedway – and comes only 9 days after the first, which honored the IndyCar Grand Prix. The third and final special event of 2021, which runs from Aug. 9-15, celebrates the NASCAR 400 at the Brickyard.

Both hams and SWLs are eligible for the newly designed 2021 W9IMS QSL cards and Checkered Flag Award. To earn the certificate, however, you must work (or tune in) W9IMS during all three of this year’s special events – and the first race has already come and gone. But even if you miss the clean sweep, you can still claim individual QSL cards from the last two races.

Tips on finding W9IMS:

  1. Check DX Summit (www.dxsummit.fi) for spots listing the current frequency or frequencies of W9IMS, if any. By typing “W9IMS” in the search box at upper right, you can customize it to show reports for only that station.
  2. Go to the W9IMS web page (www.w9ims.org) and look for the heading, “2021 Operating Schedule.” Click on the Indianapolis 500 link, which opens into a weeklong schedule listing individual operators and their reserved timeslots. Your odds of catching W9IMS on the air are enhanced during hours with an operator’s name attached.
  3. Prime time on weeknights is 6 to 10 p.m. Indy time (2200-0200 UTC). However, W9IMS can pop up anytime, even on two bands at once, between now and 11:59 p.m. Sunday, May 30 (0359 UTC Monday, May 31).
  4. Remember that the published schedule can be curtailed by adverse circumstances, such as noisy bands, local thunderstorms or a lack of calling stations.
  5. On the positive side, operators frequently fire up the station at unscheduled times. That’s why DX Summit is the best starting point for locating W9IMS’s current frequencies.
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Upcoming Test Transmission of VORW Radio International

Dear Listeners,

On Tuesday May 18th, 2021 there will be a special test transmission of VORW Radio International via radio station WWCR. The test broadcast will be 1 hour in length and will feature mixed music, the purpose of this broadcast is to determine propagation and gauge if there is any interference from neighboring stations.

Here is the time and frequency:

9350 kHz – 2300 UTC (7 PM Eastern) Tuesday May 18th, 2021 – 100 kW WWCR Nashville, TN 

Listeners in North America, Europe and West Africa should be able to receive the broadcast.

Reception reports will be extremely helpful and may be sent to vorwinfo@gmail.com

Happy listening!

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2021 W9IMS Special Event Station Details!

Now Underway: A More Typical W9IMS Special Event

By Brian D. Smith, W9IND

The fans are returning to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway this year, and with them comes a more traditional calendar for special event station W9IMS.

For hams and SWLs alike, that means a renewed opportunity to earn three newly designed QSL cards and the latest edition of the certificate known as the Checkered Flag Award.

The first W9IMS special event of 2021, saluting the upcoming IndyCar Grand Prix, is now underway and will continue through Saturday, May 15 (Race Day), ending at midnight Indianapolis time or 0400 UTC Sunday, May 16.

It’s the first of three W9IMS special events this year – two in May and the third in August – to commemorate the major auto races at the track. (Last year, because of Covid restrictions, two of the three races were held on the same weekend, and W9IMS followed suit by compressing its usual trio of special events into two.)

Here’s the remaining W9IMS slate for 2021:

May 24-30: Indianapolis 500

Aug. 9-15: NASCAR 400 at the Brickyard

Each of the three W9IMS events features its own unique QSL card, with the Checkered Flag certificate available to anyone who completes the clean sweep. However, you can still claim a single-event QSL or two even if you fail to bag the trio.

How to find W9IMS? The station will operate SSB daily on two bands, 20 or 40 meters, generally around 7.245 and 14.245 MHz, and could pop up at any time of day or night until local midnight Sunday. Keep a lookout, too, for digital activity – particularly FT8 and FT4 – on virtually any amateur radio band.

But the surest way to snare the station is this:

  1. Go to the W9IMS web page (www.w9ims.org) and find the heading, “2021 Operating Schedule.” Beneath it are links to the operator schedules for this year’s three special events; time slots with a name and a callsign offer your best bet for a W9IMS contact.
  2. Check DX Summit (www.dxsummit.fi) for spots that identify the current frequency or frequencies of W9IMS, if any. By typing “W9IMS” in the search box, you can customize it to show reports for only that station.

Remember, you can’t qualify for the 2021 certificate if you don’t catch the first event! So if you haven’t logged W9IMS by Saturday evening, keep in mind that the station traditionally conducts “happy hour” between 11 p.m. and midnight (0300 to 0400 UTC Sunday), with rapid contacts right up to the end. (But don’t stake your certificate on it: W9IMS special events may end early if the calls stop coming and/or band conditions deteriorate.)

For additional details, including QSL information, consult the W9IMS web page.

And in answer to the most-asked question: W9IMS operators transmit, usually remotely, from home stations in the Indianapolis area, but neither the ops nor the stations are physically located at the track.

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Giuseppe is impressed with the performance of his homebrew passive loop antenna

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Giuseppe Morlè (IZ0GZW), who shares the following:

Dear Thomas, I’m Giuseppe Morlè from central Italy, the Tyrrhenian Sea, Formia.

Today I tested my noise canceling loop inside the radio station by comparing it to the crossed loops. Again, like my medium wave T Ferrite, this loop proved to be very quiet, practically immune to house noise.

You can see my two videos about listening to the Voice of Turkey and a QSO on 40m. between radio amateurs–a test with two different powers, one high in AM and another much lower among radio amateurs.

Here are the videos from my YouTube channel:

Click here to view on YouTube.

Click here to view on YouTube.

A nice result knowing that we are receiving inside my radio station. The homebrew NCPL antenna you encouraged me to build is truly amazing.

Best wishes to you and the SWLing Post community.

73 by Giuseppe Morlè IZ0GZW.

Thank you so much for taking the time to share your thoughts and these videos with us, Giuseppe. It is very encouraging that we have some antenna options that help us cope with all of the RFI generated within our homes! Thank you again!

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Radiofax images of Typhoon Surigae from the Japan Meteorological Agency

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Carlos Latuff, who writes:

Technology considered obsolete, the fax, or better, radiofax (transmitted by radio) continues to be used by several meteorological agencies around the world, which broadcast weather charts to vessels on the high seas. These two images were transmitted today by the Japan Meteorological Agency and received at 19h10 and 19h50 (UTC) in Porto Alegre, Brazil.

The first image is a photo from the Japanese satellite Himawari 8. Even with noise, due to the shortwave propagation, you can see clearly the “eye” of typhoon Surigae.

The second image is a typhoon alert, indicating on the map that Surigae has changed course and is now en route to the Pacific.

These two images were transmitted today by the Japan Meteorological Agency, on the frequency of 7795 kHz

Thank you for sharing this, Carlos. It’s amazing, the amount of information you can receive over the air even with modest equipment by today’s standards. With a modest portable radio and a little decoding software, anyone can grab images like this.

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Radio Northern Europe International Show #16

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Roseanna, with Radio Northern Europe International who shares the following announcement:


Hei alle,

While the Norwegians are getting into Påskekrim (Easter Crime), the Swedish and Finnish kids are dressing up as Easter Witches and the Danes are making their Gækkebreve (Teaser Letters), we’ve created a jam-packed show for you this month with more guest spots, lots of great music and we have worked with Karl from scandipop.co.uk to bring you a song of the month!

For ease we’ve split the broadcasts into 3 versions;
• WRMI & On-Demand Version: RNEI 16 + RNEIxtra Mammas Mest Metal + Stephen’s feature + HamDRM.
• Channel 292 & Radio Onda version: RNEI 16 + HamDRM + This is an Express Music Show.
• World FM & Unique Radio version: RNEI 16 only.

RNEI #16 includes great music including:
• A new duo from Iceland who don’t want to be forgotten.
• Ku?ka’s & Four Night’s Latest.
• A great Danish song from Nana Jacobi.
• UNDER’s gorgeous chill-house remix of a famous Swedish song.
• A joik from Sweden’s Got Tallent’s winner Jon Henrik Fjällgren.
• Finland’s Heroines will be singing about their Rules.
• Scandipop.co.uk will be picking their song of the month for us to feature.
• The opening song to Mammas Mest Metal with the playlist encoded in MFSK 64 during.

A new RNEIxtra segment called Mammas Mest Metal is going to air for the first time this month on WRMI featuring a selection of Metal, Post Metal, Viking and Post-Prog Metal songs!

Afterward we’ll head over to Stephen to hear music from some sisters who sing in Welsh and Cornish, their music is beautiful!

Lastly We have a HamDRM data segment coded by Daz featuring a self rendering animation and our playlist. You can download an early alpha copy of Daz’s decoder, EasyDRF, here. Other options for HamDRM are: EasyPal & WinDRM on Windows and QSSTV &TRXAMADRM on Linux.

We are trialling some new beams this month to Asia and Africa!

Keep an eye on our announcements for extra broadcasts!

If you miss the show you can always catch up on demand and, if you prefer to only hear our music, we have Spotify Playlists of each show usually published after the first broadcast!

Happy Easter / God påske,
Roseanna

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