Category Archives: Digital Modes

A comprehensive SDRplay and SDRuno how-to video series

The SDRplay RSP2

Mike Ladd, with SDRplay, has done an amazing job putting together a comprehensive series of how-to videos for those of us with the SDRplay RSP1 and RSP2 receivers. His first set of videos have focused on using SDRuno (SDRplay’s custom SDR application), and now he’s started an SDR Console series as well.

I’ve embedded much of his video series below, but you can also find them at the SDRplay YouTube channel.

If you own an SDRplay RSP, take time to watch some or all of these videos as they’ll help you unlock RSP functionality you likely never knew existed. I’ve learned something new in each one I’ve watched.

Below, I’ve embedded 23 SDRuno how-to videos, a new SDR Console video and PDF/printable SDRplay documentation. Enjoy! (And thanks again, Mike!)


SDRuno Videos

#1 SDRuno Basic layout and settings

Click here to view on YouTube.

#2 SDRuno with VAC 1 of 2

Click here to view on YouTube.

#3 SDRuno VAC 2of 2 (showing MultiPSK)

Click here to view on YouTube.

#4 SDRuno Noise reduction intro on HF.

Click here to view on YouTube.

#5 SDRuno Memory Panel part 1 of 2

Click here to view on YouTube.

#6 SDRuno Memory Panel part 2 of 2

Click here to view on YouTube.

#7 SDRuno Calibrate your RSP-1 & RSP-2

Click here to view on YouTube.

#8 SDRuno VAC & DSDdecoder

Click here to view on YouTube.

#9 SDRuno Notching filter function

Click here to view on YouTube.

#10 SDRuno FM Broadcast RDS data decoding

Click here to view on YouTube.

#11 SDRuno, FTDX 3000, Omnirig & LOG4OM Logger

Click here to view on YouTube.

#12 SDRuno, FTDX 3000, Omnirig & LOG4OM Logger In Action

Click here to view on YouTube.

#13 SDRuno EX-Control Module

Click here to view on YouTube.

#14 SDRuno with CSV user list browser using virtual com ports.

Click here to view on YouTube.

#15 SDRuno & MultiPSK decoding APRS

Click here to view on YouTube.

#16 SDRuno & MultiPSK decoding ACARS

Click here to view on YouTube.

#17 SDRuno with the TM-2 USB Controller

Click here to view on YouTube.

#18 SDRuno Tune-LO-LO Lock

Click here to view on YouTube.

#19 pre-selection filters of the RSP-1 and RSP-2

Click here to view on YouTube.

#20 SDRuno and the VRX feature

Click here to view on YouTube.

MISC SDRUno videos

SDRuno EXT/IO Edition for a range of SDRs and dongles

Click here to view on YouTube.

SDRplay RSP with the DX Engineering RTR-2

Click here to view on YouTube.

Using the RSP-1 for the IARU HF World Championship

Click here to view on YouTube.

SDR Console videos (Brand new series)

#1 SDRplay RSP 1 & 2 with SDR Console v3

Click here to view on YouTube.

SDRplay How To documentation

Brand new SDRuno User Manual
http://www.sdrplay.com/docs/SDRplay_SDRuno_User_Manual.pdf

Frontend Reset
http://www.sdrplay.com/docs/SDRplay_Software_reset.pdf

Optimizing WIndows 7 for SDRuno
http://www.sdrplay.com/docs/SDRuno_Windows7.pdf

Setting up VSPE
http://www.sdrplay.com/docs/SDRuno_VSPE.pdf

Setting up VAC
http://www.sdrplay.com/docs/SDRuno_VAC.pdf

Decoding APRS using SDRuno and MultiPSK
http://www.sdrplay.com/docs/SDRuno_APRS.pdf

Decoding MIL-ALE using SDRuno and MultiPSK
http://www.sdrplay.com/docs/SDRuno_ALE.pdf

Decoding AIS Marine messages using SDRuno and MultiPSK
http://www.sdrplay.com/docs/SDRuno_AIS.pdf

Decoding ACARS messages using SDRuno and MultiPSK
http://www.sdrplay.com/docs/SDRuno_ACARS.pdf

Reuters: Cyber threats prompt return of radio for ship navigation

eLoran (Image Source: UrsaNav)

(Source: Reuters via Ken Hansen and Dan Hawkins)

LONDON (Reuters) – The risk of cyber attacks targeting ships’ satellite navigation is pushing nations to delve back through history and develop back-up systems with roots in World War Two radio technology.

Ships use GPS (Global Positioning System) and other similar devices that rely on sending and receiving satellite signals, which many experts say are vulnerable to jamming by hackers.

About 90 percent of world trade is transported by sea and the stakes are high in increasingly crowded shipping lanes. Unlike aircraft, ships lack a back-up navigation system and if their GPS ceases to function, they risk running aground or colliding with other vessels.

South Korea is developing an alternative system using an earth-based navigation technology known as eLoran, while the United States is planning to follow suit. Britain and Russia have also explored adopting versions of the technology, which works on radio signals.

Continue reading at Reuters online…

Receive SSTV images from the ISS today

This image from the ISS was received by Kim Elliott at about 0130 UTC on July 20, 145.8 MHz FM.

(Source: Southgate ARC)

The International Space Station is transmitting SSTV pictures to radio amateurs around the world on 145.800 MHz FM

The Slow Scan Television image transmissions are expected to continue until 1800 GMT Sunday, July 23 and can be received on simple equipment such as a handheld radio or scanner with an outside antenna.

Some of the pictures already received can be seen at
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

Useful links on receiving SSTV from the ISS
https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

ARISS Celebrates its 20th Anniversary through SSTV Event
https://amsat-uk.org/2017/07/09/ariss-20th-anniversary-sstv/

If you receive a full or partial picture from the Space Station your Local Newspaper may like to know
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/july/now-is-a-great-time-to-get-ham-radio-publicity.htm

Guest Post: How To Convert Navtex from SVO Olympia Radio into an other languages

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Klaus Boecker (DD2DR), who shares the following guest post:


Converting Navtex from SVO Olympia Radio into an other languages

by Klaus Boecker (DD2DR)

SVO’s NAVTEX transmission uses the Greek language in Latin letters.

Unfortunately, the Google translator can‘t translate Greek transmitted in Latin characters.
I found a German web site to convert the Latin letters (the complete text) to Greek letters.

After converting it is possible to use Google Translate to finish the translation.
So, it becomes more readable for people who are not familiar with the Greek language. 🙂

Use the following site to convert Latin letters to Greek letters:

http://www.griechisch-konverter.de/?area=konverter&direction=1

Here is a step by step description:

Convert Latin letters to Greek letters:

http://www.griechisch-konverter.de/?area=konverter&direction=1

After converting, it is possible to use Google Translate and translate the text to a language of your choice:

https://translate.google.com

All the conversions/translations are not 100% perfect, but better than nothing.

Some frequencies used by the NAVTEX service from SVO Olympia Radio. Maybe this list is not complete.

Navtex frequencies SVO in kHz

  • 4209
  • 4214.5
  • 4216
  • 6314
  • 6325.5
  • 8416,5
  • 8421
  • 8424
  • 12586
  • 12590.5
  • 12603.5
  • 16585
  • 16815
  • 16818
  • 16830.5

73 de DD2DR Klaus


Many thanks for sharing your tutorial, Kaus! You’re right about Google Translate, too; it’s far from perfect, but generally conveys the overall meaning of the the message. 

FCC: A detailed application for a new 10KW DRM transmitter

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Ed, who writes:

Thomas, did you see this? It’s a detailed application to the FCC for the construction of a 10KW shortwave transmitter for DRM on 9.65 MHz and 15.45 MHz.

Click here to download the application (PDF).

Thanks, Ed! I know nothing about Turms Tech other than on their FCC application, they list their business is “broadcast and data.”

Another SWLing Post reader forwarded the following from this article in Radio Mag Online:

“Of interest in the U.S. is the recent application of Turms Tech LLC to broadcast DRM from New Jersey toward Europe and the Middle East. Specifically, they plan on using the Armstrong tower, just west and north of New York City, with yagi-type antennas, generating an ERP of 10 kW on 9.65 and 15.45 MHz.”

The Radio Mag article is worth reading in full as it includes a number of DRM news items.

Additionally, if you’re interesting in following DRM news, check out the excellent DRMNA blog.

Post readers: anyone have more information about this new DRM broadcast site?  Please comment!