17th Edition of the Global Radio Guide (Winter 2021-22) Now Available

(Source: Teak Publishing Press Release)

17th Edition of the Global Radio Guide (Winter 2021-22) Now Available

On any given day, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) fueled by a meteoric rise in the country’s economics, politics, the covid pandemic, cyber security and human rights issues, Beijing Winter 2022 Olympics, and a strident expansion of the country’s military forces dominates global news headlines and news cycles. These headlines include China’s recent tensions with Taiwan, which are said to be the worst in forty years, and its other neighbors in the South China Sea region.

As China’s influence continues to expand worldwide, so have the country’s huge radio broadcast services. Local, regional, and international mediumwave and shortwave networks carry news and programming to audiences around the world. Since these services are government-sponsored you are hearing China’s Communist Party’s (CCP) perspective of worldwide events as they unfold. Topping the list of the country’s media outlets is China Radio International (CRI) the largest and most widely heard station in China.

For those who want to follow all the ongoing storylines originating from the PRC, Gayle Van Horn’s 17th Edition of her Amazon bestselling Global Radio Guide (Winter 2021-22) has all the details you need to monitor all the radio services from the Land of the Red Dragon.

Her feature is one of the most comprehensive articles ever written on the Chinese radio broadcast system. Complete schedules for all China radio services, a section of how to ID national stations broadcasting in Chinese, and links to videos with CRI IDs in 45 languages on the author’s YouTube channel that are just some of the materials you will find in this all-important cover story in the GRG. This is an indispensable guide to for the radio listener to hear China as tensions in the region continue to heat up.

China’s broadcasters are not the only focus of this completely updated edition of the GRG, though. Worldwide, tensions are continuing to escalate, and – in another case of what is old becoming new – people around the world are once again turning to shortwave radio to place themselves on the front lines.

With the help of the GRG, you can tune in to shortwave broadcast stations from other hotspots such as Cuba, India, Iran, North/South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and many other counties. If you have a shortwave radio receiver, SDR or Internet connection, pair it with this unique radio resource to know when and where to listen to the world.

This newest edition of the GRG carries on the tradition of those before it with an in-depth, 24-hour station/frequency guide with schedules for selected AM band, longwave, and shortwave radio stations. This unique resource is the only radio publication that lists by-hour schedules that include all language services, frequencies, and world target areas for over 500 stations worldwide. The schedules included in this edition of the GRG are valid from 31 October 2021 until 26 March 2022, the B21 broadcast schedule period.

The GRG includes listings of DX radio programs and Internet website addresses for many of the stations in the book. There are also entries for time and frequency stations as well as some of the more “intriguing” transmissions one can find on the shortwave radio bands.

Gayle has also updated her now-famous SDR Buyer’s Guide, a must-have compendium that helps you navigate through the revolutionary world of software-defined radios (SDRs), the new digital frontier of the radio hobby.

Also new in this 17th edition, James Careless, in an article that originally appeared in Radio World, looks at the current state of shortwave receiver technology. Dr. Adrian Peterson of AWR looks back at the early days of Philippine broadcasting. David Harris has written a review of the bhi NES10-2MK4 Noise Cancelling Speaker. Spectrum Monitor columnist Fred Waterer will take you on a guided tour of shortwave music programs from around the world.

There are updated columns including the latest radio news in Bits & Bytes, current radio QSL information and addresses, the Best of the Best DX shortwave program listings, and a listing of radio station Internet websites.

This edition also has introductory articles for beginners on Traveling the World via Shortwave Radio Broadcasts, Monitoring the Shortwave Action Bands, and Teak’s latest greatly expanded frequency list of HF non-broadcast radio stations worldwide.

Global Radio listeners are routinely entertained with unique perspectives to events, music, culture, history, and news from other countries that you will not see or hear on your local or national broadcast channels. Global Radio broadcasts are not restricted by country borders or oceans and can travel thousands of miles, reaching millions of listeners worldwide, now in over 300 different languages and dialects.

Whether you monitor shortwave radio broadcasts, amateur radio operators, or aeronautical, maritime, government, or military communications in the HF radio spectrum, this book has the frequencies to help you to hear it all. Teak Publishing’s Global Radio Guide “brings the world to you.”

You can find this edition of the Global Radio Guide, along with all of Teak Publishing e-book titles currently available for purchase, on the Teak Publishing Web site at www.teakpublishing.com. This includes all previous editions of the Global Radio Guide available at reduced sale prices.

The 17th edition of the Global Radio Guide e-Book (electronic book only, “no print edition available”) is available worldwide from Amazon and their various international websites at

https://amzn.to/3py5JPd (SWLing Post affiliate link)

The price for this latest edition is US$8.99 for over 1000 pages of radio hobby content and frequencies. Since this book is being released internationally, Amazon customers in the United Kingdom, Germany, France Spain, Italy, Japan, India, Canada, Brazil, Mexico, and Australia can order this e-Book from Amazon websites directly servicing these countries. Customers in all other countries can use the regular Amazon.com website to purchase this e-Book.

You can read any Kindle e-Book with Amazon’s ‘free’ reading apps on literally any electronic media platform. You do not have to own a Kindle reader from Amazon to read this e-book. There are Kindle apps available for iOS, Android, Mac, and PC platforms. You can find additional details on these apps by checking out this link to the Amazon website at www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?ie=UTF8&docId=1000493771.

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Radio Waves: Life-Changing Song on Radio Australia, NZ Voices in the Air, NIST Test Signal on WWV/WWVH, and 1980s NYC Offshore Pirates

Radio Waves:  Stories Making Waves in the World of Radio

Because I keep my ear to the waves, as well as receive many tips from others who do the same, I find myself privy to radio-related stories that might interest SWLing Post readers.  To that end: Welcome to the SWLing Post’s Radio Waves, a collection of links to interesting stories making waves in the world of radio. Enjoy!

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributors Paul, Dave Zantow, Mark Fahey, Jerome van der Linden, and Phil Brennan for the following tips:


A former Chinese soldier turned artist explains how a song on Radio Australia changed his life (ABC)

It was 1979 and Jian Guo was stationed at a military camp in Yunnan, a province in south-western China bordering Vietnam, when he listened to Radio Australia for the first time.

The then-17-year-old was patrolling the base one night when he saw a group of fellow People’s Liberation Army (PLA) soldiers tuning radio equipment on the back of a truck.

He initially thought they were intercepting enemy signals, but, as he got closer, he realised they were listening to a radio broadcast.

It was the ABC’s international broadcasting service, which was considered an “enemy channel” at the time.

“The so-called ‘enemy channels’ included almost every station outside mainland China,” Guo told the ABC.

“The biggest ones were the VOA [Voice of America] from the US, Voice of Free China from Taiwan, and Radio Australia.”

Guo had joined the PLA in 1979 during the peak of the Sino-Vietnamese War but, thanks to his talent in the arts, he was chosen to be a secretary of his company, so he could avoid fighting on the battlefield.

Apart from painting propaganda materials, he also looked after weapons and communication equipment like the radios, which was an extraordinary privilege.

He was not supposed to use the equipment he maintained, and was fearful of breaking the rules, but after seeing his comrades listening to the Australian broadcast the curiosity grew inside him.

One night, alone in his room, he turned on a radio.

It took a while for him to find the right frequency, because of the interference put out by China, but then suddenly he was listening to Radio Australia and the song that would change his life.

“It was broadcasting The Moon Represents My Heart by Teresa Teng,” Guo said.

“That was the first time I knew such music existed in the world.” [Continue reading…]

Voices in the Air: Sarah Johnston on 100 years of radio (RNZ)

Kia ora koutou k?toa. Thank you to RNZ and National Library for organising this celebration of the start of radio in New Zealand, 100 years ago tonight.

Tonight is something of a game of two halves: first I will talk about the first broadcast of voice and music by radio and the start of radio broadcasting in this country – and then I’m also going speak about a research project I am working on, radio recordings made of New Zealand’s forces overseas during World War II.

I have always been a huge fan of radio, ever since childhood listening to the Weekend children’s request sessions, and then as a teenager, eating my breakfast with Morning Report coming out of the family transistor beside me. As a radio journalist I became one of those voices and worked for RNZ and Deutsche Welle in Germany, where I experienced the power of voices coming out of the air from the other side of the world. And as a sound archivist working with the Radio New Zealand archives, I learnt that that power of the voice doesn’t diminish with time – listening to a voice from 80 years ago can transport you not just through space but also time. Sound to me, has a power that in many ways seems different to that of visual images. Continue reading

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Radio Northern Europe International Show #24 announcement and more

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Roseanna, with Radio Northern Europe International who shares the following announcement:


Radio Northern Europe International Show #24, Jul 2021 & Annual Report Announcement!

Hei alle sammen,

There’s going to be some big changes to our broadcast schedule starting this December and our Annual Report for 2021 full of insider statistics is being published. And we will be bringing you some amazing Christmas songs too!

Firstly our Annual Report has now been published here. This report contains details about the music we play, the running costs of RNEI and how we are making our decisions. If you want to help support us we have a Patreon here

We’d also love it if you could email us what your favourite song from 2021 was for the January “best of 2021” special!

Now on to the fun stuff, RNEI #24 is our December & Christmas show in one!
It will feature:

  • Fun Christmas music from Norway
  • Punchy Swedish Pop from Petra Marklund
  • Silent Night but it’s ABREU
  • Lea Heart helps it feel like Christmas
  • Julia-Maria, a small artist from Ireland, brings us a beautiful song
  • Órla Fallon brings us multilingual traditional Irish Christmas song
  • Our song of the month from a Danish newcomer, chosen by Karl from scandipop.co.uk
  • Daði Freyr gives us something magical this Christmas
  • Boyzvoice is back and this time they’re dancy complete with the MFSK64 playlist embedded inside!
  • On WRMI or On-Demand you’ll also hear:
    • Mamma’s Mest Metal (Christmas Special)
    • Stephen’s Feature on the English singer/songwriter/guitarist John Bramwell
    • Daz’s EasyDRF Playlist (Decoder here – Not on-demand)
  • On Channel 292:
    • You will hear a fantastic episode of This is an Express Music Show
    • You’ll also have a chance to receive Daz’s EasyDRF Playlist (Decoder here) just before TIAEMS starts

RNEI Christmas 2021 Target Map

We have a bonus broadcast from Channel 292 this month that is aimed at 332° targeting Northern Europe between Ireland and Finland and Southern Europe between Ukraine and Italy. This happens because there is some backbeam with these directional antennas so give them a go and see what happens!

Click here to view a clickable antenna pattern schedule at RNEI.org

If you miss the show you can always catch up on demand and, if you prefer to only hear our music, we have Spotify Playlists of each show usually published shortly after the first broadcast of the show!

We really hope you enjoy the show and look forward to receiving your feedback,
God jul alle sammen!
Roseanna

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Dan spots “an ultra rare” JRC NRD-302A at auction on Buyee

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Dan Robinson, who writes:

The seemingly un-ending stream of classic premium receivers continues at the Japan auction site known as “Buyee”:

This ultra-rare Japan Radio Company NRD-302A is expected to exceed the U.S. $5,000 mark.

As premium receiver collectors/users know, the 302A is certainly among the top rarest of the JRC professional/marine line. At the top of that line was the NRD-630, which was described by the company at the time it was being manufactured, as a “training” receiver. For some reason, though more of them were manufactured by JRC, the 302A is even more infrequently seen on the used market.

Listed as “typically unavailable” on Page 347 of the Osterman Receivers Past and Present guide, the 302A exceeds the previous 301A model in having ISB mode and a narrow 0.5 filter, with 1 Hertz tuning resolution. Previous other ultra-rare JRC sets on the Japan site included two NRD-95 receivers, both of which came in at over $5,000 U.S.

Click here to check out this auction.

What a beautiful radio!  Thanks for sharing this insight with us, Dan. Very curious what this ultra rare rig will fetch!

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Wave Farm’s Short Waves / Long Distance Open Call 2022

(Source: Wave Farm via David Goren)

Short Waves / Long Distance Open Call 2022

Wave Farm, Montez Press Radio, and The North American Shortwave Association are pleased to announce “Short Waves / Long Distance,” an open call for works exploring the sonics of the shortwave radio spectrum (2-30 mHz), and the experience of long distance listening. The call is in conjunction with the 35th Anniversary of the Winter Shortwave Listener’s Fest and Wave Farm’s 25th Anniversary, both of which will be celebrated in 2022.

Selected works will be:

Submission Deadline: January 31, 2022

Submission Guidelines and Instructions:

  • Submissions are welcomed from all genres.
  • Both pre-existing and newly created works are eligible. Please note: Works submitted to the 2017 Open Call are ineligible, regardless of their selection status.
  • Works should not exceed ten minutes in duration.

Shortwave Listening Resources:

 

Click Here to Access the Online Submission Form

Jury and Notification Schedule:

  • A jury comprised of representatives from The Shortwave Shindig, Montez Press Radio, and Wave Farm will review submissions.
  • Selections will be announced in late February 2022

About The Shortwave Shindig
The Shortwave Shindig is a live immersion into the wavering, noisy sounds of the shortwave radio spectrum. Live performances, presentations and extended, multi-layered audio mixes combine real time and archival shortwave sounds, taking the listener on a guided tour through the atmospheric neighborhoods where shortwave stations cluster. Reels of archival audio and a bank of receivers are on hand for tuning-in to the distant, elusive sounds of the shortwave bands. http://www.shortwaveology.net/shortwave-shindig/

About the Winter SWL Fest
The Winter Shortwave Listener’s Fest (March 4th-5th 2022) is a conference of radio hobbyists of all stripes who listen to frequencies from “DC to daylight.” Every year scores of hobbyists descend on the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania suburbs for a weekend of camaraderie and talking radio. The Fest is sponsored by NASWA, the North American Shortwave Association, but it covers much more than just shortwave. Additional topics include Medium wave (AM), VHF scanning, satellite TV, and pirate broadcasting. http://www.swlfest.com/

About Montez Press Radio
Montez Press Radio is an experimental broadcasting and performance platform. Founded in 2018 with the goal of fostering greater experimentation and conversation between artists, writers, and thinkers through the medium of radio, MPR allows different corners of the art world to interact with each other in person and on air—a place where media finally meets flesh. We’re drawn to art that exists in the unexpected, the authenticity of sharing without a script, the sounds of ideas in the making, conversation that forgets there’s an audience. We also like books. All in-studio broadcasts are free and open to the public. Stop by when we’re live at 46 Canal Street #2 in NYC or look at the upcoming schedule to see if we’re off-site and broadcasting near you. https://radio.montezpress.com

About Wave Farm
Wave Farm is a non-profit arts organization driven by experimentation with broadcast media and the airwaves. A pioneer of the Transmission Arts genre, Wave Farm provides access to transmission technologies and supports artists and organizations that engage with media and the electromagnetic spectrum as an art form. Wave Farm’s Residency Program provides artists working within the Transmission Arts genre opportunities to research and create new works. Wave Farm’s Archives document and contextualize this work, including the Wave Farm Radio Art Archive, which is a project of an annual fellowship program. The Transmission Art Installation park features long-term projects installed on Wave Farm’s 29-acres in Acra, NY. These projects amplify the environment revealing what is otherwise unheard or unseen. Wave Farm’s WGXC-FM is a full-power, non-commercial, listener-supported station in New York’s Upper Hudson Valley operating out of dedicated studios in Acra and Hudson, NY; as well as pop-up temporary studio locations throughout the listening area and beyond. WGXC transmits 3,300 watts to more than 78,000 potential listeners on 90.7-FM and unlimited international listeners at wavefarm.org/listen. Hands-on access and par­ticipation distinguish WGXC as a public platform for information, experimenta­tion, and engagement. https://wavefarm.org

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100th Anniversary of Transatlantic Tests: Special event station using a 1921 replica transmitter

1BCG Transmitter in 1921 (Source: 1BCG.org)

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mark (AE2EA), who shares the following announcement:

2021 marks the 100th year anniversary of the historic Transatlantic Tests, where radio amateurs using the call sign 1BCG were responsible for the first successful radio communication across the Atlantic Ocean on “short waves.”

On December 11, 2021 the Antique Wireless Association will recreate these historic transmissions on 160 meters from the Vintage Radio and Communications Museum of Connecticut, using a replica transmitter constructed by volunteers at the Antique Wireless Association. This special event is your opportunity to relive a historic moment in amateur radio history.

More information can be found here http://1BCG.org

Here’s a summary:

The 1BCG replica transmitter will be operating as W2AN/1BCG on 1.820 MHz, plus or minus, using CW, from The Vintage Radio and Communications Museum of Connecticut. Transmissions from W2AN/1BCG will be one-way, just like the original transatlantic tests in 1921. You can get a SWL certificate for this Special Event by sending a copy of the transmitted message to 1BCG@antiquewireless.org

Schedule: Transmissions start on December 11, 2021, on 1.820 MHz, +/-, at 1800 EST or 2300 UTC, then every 15 minutes thereafter for a total of five hours thusly; 1815, 1830, 1845, 1900, 1915, 1930, 1945, 2000, 2015, 2030, 2045, 2100, 2115, 2130, 2145, 2200, 2215, 2230 and the last transmission at 2245 EST.

Mark ~ AE2EA
Antique Wireless Association

I will definitely be listening! Thank you so much for sharing this, Mark!

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Mario finds a monophonic earphone with 6 foot cord

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi (N2HUN), who writes:

Attached is a picture of a recent purchase of mine from eBay, a six foot long monophonic earphone for use with my Panasonic RF-2200.

Single mono earphones of that length are not easy to find. Most are too short for night stand use. And with the abundance of RFI emitting appliances in the home, a six-foot long earphone allows me to move my portable radio far away from things like laptops, cell phones and noisy power supplies.

73’s,

Mario N2HUN

Thank you for sharing this, Mario. I love how practical and affordable this is and the fact that the earpiece is identical (save cord length) to the original that would have accompanied the RF-2200. Click here to check out this item on eBay.

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