Category Archives: Schedules and Frequencies

New Broadcast Schedule for VORW Radio International Transmissions!

Hello shortwave listeners! I wanted to make this post in order to provide an updated broadcast schedule for my transmissions to Europe and North America for the Fall of 2022.

This radio program is 1 Hour in length and features miscellaneous discussion (sometimes about current events, other times about random subjects on my mind) at the start of the program and is then balanced out with listener requested music. I hope for it to be an enjoyable light entertainment program with good music and discussion!

Updated Schedule:

Friday 1600 UTC (7 PM EEST/MSK) – 9670 kHz – Moosbrunn 100 kW – Europe, Russia, The Middle East, Central & East Asia

Saturday 0600 UTC (2 AM Eastern / 1 AM Central) – 4840 kHz – WWCR 100 kW – North America

Saturday 2200 UTC (6 PM Eastern / 5 PM Central) – 6115 kHz – WWCR 100 kW – Eastern North America

Monday 0400 UTC (12 AM Eastern / 11 PM Central Sunday Evening) – 4840 kHz – WWCR 100 kW – North America

Listener reception feedback is much appreciated at [email protected] and e-QSL’s will be sent out for reception reports, a special e-QSL is also sent out for reception reports for the transmission on 9670 kHz.

Happy listening!

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WRTH 2023 will be available in print and digital form under new ownership

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Andrea Borgnino, who shared the following via Twitter:

The next edition of the WRTH “world’s most comprehensive and up-to-date guide to broadcasting” will be published in December 2022 in a printed and a digital version. The rights have now been transferred to Radio Data Center GmbH (RDC), based in Freising, Germany.

This is fantastic news! Thank you for sharing this, Andrea.

UPDATE: WRTH has posted the following press release (click to download PDF).

Of course, we’ll post more details as they become available. 

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Alan Roe’s A22 season guide to music on shortwave (version 3)

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Alan Roe, who shares his A-22 (version 3) season guide to music on shortwave. Alan provides this amazing resource as a free PDF download:

Click here to download Music on Shortwave A-22 v3 (PDF)

Thank you for sharing your excellent guide, Alan!

This dedicated page will always have the latest version of Alan’s guide available for download.

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Decode the Enigma: Crypto Transmission from KPH on Saturday, July 23, 2022

The Maritime Radio Historical Society is hosting a brilliant on-the-air event via KPH. I’ve pasted full details below, copies directly from the Maritime Radio Historical Society announcement:


ATTENTION ALL AGENTS!

Crypto Transmission from KPH!

Background

The MHRS in cooperation with our good friends at the Cipher History Museum

will send a coded message in 5-letter groups via the facilities of coast stations KPH on Saturday July 23, 2022. The message will be encrypted using the famous Enigma code machine.

All KPH listeners are invited to try their hand at receiving and decrypting the message. Certificates will be awarded for proof of successful decode, first to decode and use of original hardware.

Mislaid your Enigma code machine? In the military you’d have some explaining to do, soldier. But for the KPH Crypto Event, no problem. See the ‘Enigma Simulator’ section below for a link to an easy-to-use Enigma simulator.

Enigma

The Enigma was the Germans’ most sophisticated coding machine for securely transmitting command and control messages via radio communications in WWII. It was considered so secure that it was used to encipher the most top-secret of messages.

The arrangement of Enigma’s rotors and plugboard connections provided a unique series of letter substitutions which changed with each keystroke. The daily rotor order and the ring and plugboard settings to be used were specified in a codebook distributed monthly to all users of a network.

For additional information on the Enigma please see Ralph Simpsons’ Cipher Museum History site

Crypto broadcast date, time and formats.

The crypto broadcast will commence at 2000Z (1300 Pacific) on 23 July on all KPH CW frequencies. The broadcast will consist of a ‘callup’ (in plain text) announcing the broadcast, followed by the cipher message. The callup and cipher messages will be sent at 15 WPM. The cipher message will be sent in 5 letter groups and the message will be sent twice to ensure proper reception.

The usual KPH channel marker or ‘wheel’ running at 20 WPM will precede the announcement for the crypto broadcast to give listeners a chance to tune to the strongest signal in their area.

The KPH CW frequencies are (in kc):

    • 426 (after an announcement on 500)
    • 4247.0
    • 6477.5
    • 8642.0
    • 12808.5
    • 17016.8
    • 22477.5

Upon completion of the CW transmissions, the broadcast will be repeated on all KPH RTTY frequencies. The RTTY transmission will be 170cps shift Baudot, 45 baud.

The KPH RTTY frequencies are (in kc):

    • 6324.5
    • 8427.0
    • 12585.5

Code Machine Key Settings – IMPORTANT!

Decoding an Enigma message requires the use of two keys: a Daily Key (valid for particular day), and a Message Key (unique to each individual message sent that day).

The Daily Key

Prior to decoding a message, the daily key must be set into your Enigma code machine. The daily key settings were specified in codebooks and distributed monthly. Please consult the following codebook to obtain the daily key setting for the GMT date of the broadcast.

Click HERE for the Enigma codebook. Use the “Armee-Stabs-Maschinenschlussel No 28” (Army Staff Machine Key Number 28). Notice each daily setting is across one line, starting with the first day of the month on the bottom of the sheet.

The Message Key

Starting in 1940, for additional security, the machine operator would randomly choose two groups of three letters to encode each message (in addition to the daily key settings above). These were known as the ‘message key’. The first group of three letters is used to encode the second group of three. Then the first group (in plaintext) and the second group (now encoded) are sent in the message header, along with the date and letter count, as explained in the above link. The recipient then uses the message key to decode the message. For more information see the following video on Enigma decoding procedures.

Click HERE to watch a video on Enigma coding procedures.

Enigma Simulators

So you had to toss your Enigma machine overboard when your U-boat was captured? Again, no worries. MHRS has you covered! Software simulations exist for the Enigma code machine.

Click HERE for an Enigma simulator. It is web-based, no download necessary.

Certificates

Upon proof of successful decode, the following certificates will be awarded:

– First to decode the Enigma message

– Successful decode using *original* hardware (i.e., an actual Enigma machine)

– All successful decodes of the message

To apply for a certificate, send the decoded message to [email protected] with the subject line ‘decoded Enigma message’. The First to Decode award will be based on the timestamp of the first email demonstrating a successful decode. For the Enigma Original Hardware certificate, send the decoded message *plus* a photo of your Enigma machine showing the daily key setting. Printed certificates will be mailed for ‘First-to-Decode and ‘Original Hardware’ awards. Certificates for ‘Successful Decode’ will be emailed in digital form suitable for printing at home.

More Information

For more information or questions about the KPH cipher broadcast send email to [email protected] with the subject line:

Crypto Broadcast

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Upcoming High Power Broadcast of VORW Radio International to Europe & Beyond

 

Hello shortwave listeners! I wanted to make this little post as a reminder for an upcoming broadcast of mine – transmitted with high power for listeners in Europe and beyond!

Friday 1600 UTC (7 PM EEST/MSK) – 9670 kHz – Moosbrunn 100 kW – Europe, Russia, The Middle East, Central & East Asia

You can hear this airing every Friday, the program is 1 Hour in length and features miscellaneous discussion (sometimes about current events, other times about random subjects on my mind) at the start of the program and is then balanced out with good listener requested music. I hope for it to be an enjoyable light entertainment program with good music and discussion.

For this airing only, I verify reception reports with a special e-QSL! Listener reception feedback is much appreciated at [email protected]

Happy listening!

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Changes to KTWR’s DRM broadcast schedule effective 3rd July, 2022

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mangosman, who shares the following tip from Mike Sabin at KTWR via Alokesh Gupta’s blog:

Due to requests for later broadcasts, improved propagation, and the addition of a program, KTWR is changing its DRM broadcast schedule effective 3rd July, 2022.

KTWR Digital Broadcasts
DRM broadcasts (Effective 3rd July 2022):

Day Time(UTC) Frequency Coverage Area Language
—————————————————
Saturday 1100-1127 12000 kHz China English
Saturday 1128-1230 9910 kHz Japan Japanese, English
Mon-Fri 1215-1245 9910 kHz China Mandarin
Sunday 1500-1545 15205 kHz India English
Sunday 1600-1630 15390 kHz India South Indian languages

(Mike Sabin, KTWR)

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Full Schedule of RTI Transmission Tests and Special QSL

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Gerard Koopal, who writes:

Dear Thomas,

[Per the email message below] from Radio Taiwan International, they will bring a direct transmission from Tamsui, Taiwan in German and French.

For correct reception reports there is a special QSL card available.

Reports can be sent to: [email protected] or via the Online Form or by snailmail (Radio Taiwan International, German Service, PO Box 123-199, Taipei 11199, Taiwan).

Wishing everybody a good reception!

Gerard Koopal

Almere, The Netherlands


Onderwerp: RTI direct broadcasts from Tamsui July 2022

Dear RTI listeners,

This year, RTI will once again be broadcasting its German-language program directly from the Tamsui transmitter in Taiwan on several days.

Broadcast dates and frequencies July 2022:

Frequency 11995 kHz 1700-1800 UTC
Frequency 9545 kHz 1900-2000 UTC

1) 08.07. Friday
2) 09.07. Saturday
3) 10.07. Sunday
4) 15.07. Friday
5) 16.07. Saturday
6) 17.07. Sunday
7) 22.07. Friday
8) 23.07. Saturday
9) 24.07. Sunday
10) 29.07. Friday
11) 30.07. Saturday
12) 31.07. Sunday

We confirm receipt reports with a special QSL card.

You can send reception reports to [email protected] by email, using the online form, or by mail (Radio Taiwan International, German Service, PO Box 123-199, Taipei 11199, Taiwan).

We would also like to point out that this year in August RTI will also be broadcasting French-language programs directly from the Tamsui transmitter on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.

We look forward to your reception reports!

Your RTI editorial team

https://de.rti.org.tw/

[email protected]


Thank you for the tip, Gerard!

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