Tag Archives: Dan Robinson

Dan’s QSL signed by Miki Gurdus

Regarding our recent post about Miki Gurdus, SWLing Post contributor Dan Robinson, writes:

Went through my books and found it, the Gurdus handwritten note to me. It appears to have been during a visit he made to Washington, likely in the period I was in college 1975-1979 but could have been later during the 80’s or 90’s.

It reads: “To Dan — In Memory of a joyful day in Washington. Michael Gurdus.”

Amazing! Thank you for sharing your memories, Dan.

Sony ICF-6800W: Dan notes a possible record sales price on eBay

 Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Dan Robinson, who writes:

A couple of years ago I did a talk a the annual SWL Fest on the best radios of all time (in my opinion anyway). The SONY ICF-6800W was among them, for reasons I think are valid — high sensitivity and beautiful audio, the major ones. Now, one has sold for what could be a record price on eBay — more than $1300. This shows how much folks are willing to pay for 6800Ws that still have the original box….

Wow–to many the ICF-6800W is a “Holy Grail” receiver. Amazing that it has held its value so well. If memory serves, it’s not the easiest radio to work on, but is certainly serviceable.

Thanks for the info, Dan!

Dan spots a mint Panasonic RF-B65 on eBay

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Dan Robinson, who shares the following:

This does not appear to have the AC adaptor — not all kits included that, but they are findable on Ebay] OK, folks here’s your chance — a Panasonic RF-B65, one of the best portables of all time in terms of overall sensitivity and audio (in this size category) in what appears to be Like New condition. Price is about right for one of these complete with box, manuals, etc I usually jump on these but I already have two in this condition….

Click here to view on eBay.

The RF-B65 is certainly a highly regarded portable and Dan knows I’m on the hunt for one. Frankly, I’ll probably wait until next year to search for a deal. This model is not the cheapest, but looks incredibly clean and is being sold by a seasoned seller with 100% positive feedback. If you’ve been considering an RF-65B, this is a good one.  Thanks for the tip, Dan!

U Twente antenna damaged

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Dan Robinson, who shares the following item from BCL News and Richard Langley:

Antenna of Twente SDR receiver damaged // Bclnews
http://www.bclnews.it/2017/10/06/antenna-of-twente-sdr-receiver-damaged/

The antenna was damaged yesterday during a storm. As posted on the WebSDR website:

“The antenna currently is not working properly. After a preliminary repair of rain/storm damage on October 5, it seems reception has faded away again during the night. We’ll try to fix this soon, weather and spare-time manpower permitting.”

(Richard Langley via dxld yg)

Shortwave: A new psychological thriller

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Dan Robinson, who shares the following review of a new movie called “shortwave”

Movie Review – Shortwave (2016) // Flickering Myth
https://www.flickeringmyth.com/2017/10/movie-review-shortwave-2016/

Shortwave, 2016.

Directed by Ryan Gregory Phillips.
Starring Juanita Ringeling, Cristobal Tapia Montt, and Kyle Davis.

SYNOPSIS:

Isabel and Josh, a young couple dealing with the recent loss of their child, move to a remote home that Josh’s work has can study mysterious radio signals. As Josh hones in on the origin of the signals, Isabel begins to exhibit strange behavior, which leads to the pair confronting their painful past as well as their bizarre present circumstances.

Though it is a smaller, more intimate film, writer-director Ryan Gregory Phillips’s Shortwave will evoke inevitable comparisons to this year’s It Comes at Night. The two films both feature small groups of characters in isolated forest settings being terrorized both by mysterious forces and each other. And both share a fondness for dream sequences and ominous red lighting. But where It Comes at Night was frustrating in its evasiveness and its refusal to embrace most of the tenets of its genre, Shortwave is mysterious yet forthright about its science fiction and horror DNA.

The plot is set into motion when Josh and his wife Isabel (Cristobal Tapia Montt and Juanita Ringeling) are sent by his employer to live in a remote home, where he can continue to study the origins of mysterious radio signals. Their relationship is under extreme pressure for a multitude of reasons, most significantly their disappearance of their child. As Josh gets closer to discovering the origins of the radio signals, Isabel begins to act very strangely.

There is no doubt that Shortwave is a low-budget film, but it uses that to its advantage. It’s setting feels like a real home in an isolated forest, and the fact that most scenes feature Isabel and/or Matt and no other actors allows the viewer to focus on their relationship, which is really the epicenter of the film. Ringeling and Montt both give excellent performances in roles that require a full range of emotion, and Phillips wisely gives them room to operate, even within the film’s slim 85-minute runtime. The two actors have excellent chemistry as well, making them believable as a couple even when the script has them at odds with one another.

Shortwave also has some commonalities with this year’s excellent indie A Dark Song in that while it is unapologetically a genre effort, it isn’t afraid to really dig into the foundation in which is plot is based. In the case of both films, the foundation is two damaged people dealing with loss and grief under extraordinary, partially otherworldly pressures. Given the grim subject matter, Phillips wisely keeps the pacing brisk and the runtime short. As a result, Shortwave, while serious, doesn’t overuse its ability to raise questions about loss and grief. Instead, it balances them in with solid scares and creative mysteries that seem to have a lot more backstory than what is explained here.

There should be more films like Shortwave, as its successes come as a result of sharp ideas and well-executed direction and performances rather than a huge budget. It manages to carve out a unique perspective in a saturated genre, and triggers the heart and mind in addition to the adrenal glands. Though it ends a bit abruptly, it still manages to feel like a complete experience, and has some genuinely scary moments. Shortwave is definitely worth watching as horror film, as a domestic drama, and as a showcase for the talents of its stars and its director.

Mike McClelland

Click here to read the review at Flickering Myth.

Click here to view “Shortwave” at the IMDB.