Tag Archives: Shortwave Radio

Five Beeps: Can you identify Carlos’ mystery signal?

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Carlos Latuff, who writes from Brazil:

[Please check out this] audio sample of a signal I heard today (July 20, 2021) around 07h17 UTC on (at least) 4 different frequencies, simultaneously:

– 16166 kHz
– 16716 kHz
– 16747 kHz
– 16839 kHz

Always the same. Five beeps repeating in intervals of 30 seconds. 
Another mystery to be solved by your readers.

Thank you for sharing this, Carlos. Hopefully, a reader can comment and ID these beeps for us!

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REE Noblejas Site Celebrates 50 Years

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Tracy Wood, who shares the following article and translation:

REE Noblejas Site celebrates 50 years.

Radio Exterior de España’s “Amigos de la Onda Corta” latest show marks the history of the 50 years of the Noblejas Broadcast Center.

Program Summary (loose translation)

Noblejas is the voice of Spain in the world, the only shortwave site that Radio Exterior de España currently has to broadcast the country’s events.

The RNE Shortwave Broadcast Center No. 2 was inaugurated on July 21, 1971. It is the largest space in dimensions that the Spanish Radio Television Corporation currently has. For half a century, Noblejas has been the voice of Spain to the world, the only transmission site that Radio Exterior de España currently has after the closure of the centers in Santa Cruz de Tenerife in 1982, Arganda del Rey (Madrid) in 1985 and Cariari de Pococí (Costa Rica) in 2013. It occupies 144 hectares (355 acres) and has a main building with three floors offering 8,000 square meters of useful area, housing four transmitters with which the REE signal is transmitted to all of the Americas, West Africa, the South Atlantic, the Middle East, and the Indian Ocean. The antenna field consists of 27 directional curtain arrays that encompass some three kilometers in length. The Noblejas transmission center has been operating for 50 years. It was only absent for two months (from October to December 2014) when the government wanted to halt REE shortwave broadcasts (ed. – RTVE budget cuts.) Fortunately, the broadcasts returned, and listeners still can enjoy eight hours of daily broadcasting on that band.

(The “Amigos” program notes the station still has available four 100 kilowatt units capable of 6-26 Mhz. REE broadcasts in Spanish, Portuguese, French, Arabic, Russian, English and Sefardí.)

Spanish Audio is here:
https://www.rtve.es/play/audios/amigos-de-la-onda-corta/amigos-onda-corta-50-anos-del-centro-emisor-noblejas-15-07-21/5987840/

Documentary film clip of Francisco Franco at the station’s inauguration is here starting at the 50-second mark:
https://www.rtve.es/filmoteca/no-do/not-1490/1486589/

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Checking In: Where are you on the dial–?

This has been a busy summer for me here at SWLing Post HQ. In the background, I’ve been working on a number of reviews and articles for The Spectrum Monitor and a new transceiver review for RadCom, among many other projects (including my Social DX list).

My work and family life has been very busy–no doubt some catch-up after a slower-than-normal (pandemic) year.

 

My listening time has been very limited and I’ve found I’ve done much less weak signal work and, instead, have been sticking with some of my staple, reliable broadcasters. I’ve been listening to many of the music programs on WRMI and of course the Voice of Greece. Mostly, I have these on in the background as I do other things around the shack.

My Yaesu FRG-7 has been piping out tunes in the shack more so than my SDRs as of late due to a recent computer upgrade (which requires numerous re-installations). There is serious appeal in being able to turn on a radio without any boot up, I must say! With that said, I’m missing my SDR time, too.

My hope is that my level of work activities will slow down a bit this fall and I’ll enjoy some proper QRN-free weak signal DXing. 🙂

How about you?

What are you tuning to these days on the dial and with what radio?   Please comment!

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Alan Roe’s A21 season guide to music on shortwave (version 4 update)

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Alan Roe, who shares his latest A21 season guide to music on shortwave.

Click here to download Music on Shortwave A-21 v4 (PDF)

Alan notes that this might be the final update of the A-21 broadcast season.

This dedicated page will always have the latest version of Alan’s guide available for download.

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Comrade Africa: A historic look at the GDR’s Cold War era shortwave broadcasts to Africa

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Ulis (K3LU), who shares the following note via his Twitter feed:

“Comrade Africa” – a historic look at the GDR’s (Radio Berlin International) Cold War era shortwave broadcasts to Africa via the BBC World Service:

Click here to listen to the documentary at the BBC World Service.

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Guest Post: Great news from CFVP Alberta!

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Dan Robinson, who shares the following guest post:


Big news in these days of declined shortwave

by Dan Robinson

It is rare — no super rare — that we get any good news these days about shortwave broadcasting. Remember the excitement a few years ago when Guinea returned to shortwave? Then, Nigeria returned but has now become worryingly intermittent.

Today, a station returned to shortwave, one that was absent for some time.

CFVP, the low power relay of 1060 kHz AM in Calgary, Alberta returned to 6,030 kHz with the help of amateur radio operators. The station had been off the air through 2019 — the last time it was reported was in late 2018 when it was relaying CKMX 1060 AM in Calgary.

According to a note posted on the World of Radio group:

“two engineers from Bell Media, Dale and Gerry, who are also hams, VA6AD and V6QCT respectively, rebuilt the transmitter (partially with ham radio parts) and repaired the connection to the antenna with a temporary matching network…the temporary matching network means that not all the 100 watts are going into antenna.”

According to Harold Sellers, who is acting as eQSL manager for the re-activated shortwave station, CFVP 6030 was back on the air as of 0900, though I was unable to hear it until later on June 19th. Best reception was via SDR sites in southern Alberta, northern Montana, Idaho and up in Edmonton, Alberta.

Programming consisted of straight comedy routines from Funny 1060 AM, the Calgary station that carries old recordings of standup comedians, with local IDs and ads mixed in every few minutes. I made a video showing CFVP reception on one of the SDR sites, changing between 6,030 kHz and 1060 kHz which was also audible at SDR locations.

Earlier this year, in March, DX’er Don Moman reported the following, which proved to be true:

” . . .They had a transmitter problem which has been fixed, but they have also identified an antenna issue. The problem [was] troubleshooting and testing the antenna and matching network in the point blank presence of a 50kw AM transmitter. Testing/ repair on CFVP radiator will be done when the 50kw signal can be powered down or off, to enable more accurate testing. Bell will not power down or shut down during ratings periods which are long and frequent. Having said that, repair will likely happen with the above taken into consideration, as well as warm weather. Best guess: Before next winter at the latest, this spring the earliest.”

In August, Harold Sellers reported that the ground at the base of the shortwave tower was under water, and that grounding rods and ground wire needed replacement, and later that the tower grounding had been replaced/fixed. The transmitter also had issues but was repaired and back out at the site.

I quickly sent a reception report to the email address provided by Harold Sellers, and was pleased to receive back a eQSL which Harold said was the second one sent out to those who heard the station on its re-activation day.

Those of us who began our listening in the 1960’s (some much earlier than that!) remember the great days when Canada had a number of regional stations on shortwave. QSLs from some of those, including a 1983 QSL from CFVP/Calgary, are attached to this article.

A screenshot of CFVP as it was being heard on reactivated 6,030 kHz is also shown.

Interestingly, the Wikipedia listing for CKMX shows 6,030 kHz as being active — it’s not known, however, whether the Wikipedia listing was ever updated to note that 6,030 kHz was off the air for nearly 2 years.

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