Category Archives: Guest Posts

Guest Post: Old Fashioned Band-Scan after the Solar Storms

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, TomL, who shares the following guest post:


Old Fashioned Band-Scan after the Solar Storms

by TomL

This is just an old fashioned band scan to randomly see what I could hear after last week’s solar perturbations when the Solar Flux Index went well over 200.  I considered what I could hear on the shortwave broadcast bands, even though the SFI had quieted down to around 135.  Would the ionosphere still be holding on to the charge built up during the solar storms?  The date and time was January 30, 2023 around 1400 through 1600 UTC.  By the way, as of today (February 2), the bands are dead and cannot hear any of these even though the Solar Flux is about the same!

I will not have time to describe my antenna setup now at my noisy Condominium in detail.  I have been experimenting with a DX Engineering NCC2 antenna phasing device for the past year with somewhat good results.  I had to place dedicated receive antennas in many different ways in order to find an arrangement that works in conjunction with the two Ham Radio antenna wires out on the porch.  Sometimes it helps by lowering the noise, sometimes the native antenna by itself, or peaking the signal,  has better reception even though it might be slightly more noisy.  By matching one of two receive-only antennas (the left Heathkit switch) with one of the Ham Radio antennas (the right Daiwa switch), I can usually eke out some extra decibels of signal-to-noise improvement. Continue reading

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A DXpedition to East Sandy

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Don Moore–noted author, traveler, and DXer–for the following guest post:


A DXpedition to East Sandy

By Don Moore

When I was in college over forty years ago, seven of us had a small DX club in central Pennsylvania. A couple of times a year we would gather at the house of one of our parents for an all-night DX session. We shared tips and ideas, had fun, and always heard some new DX. Good DX can happen anywhere if conditions are right and most of mine over the past fifty years took place at wherever home happened to be at the time. But most of my best experiences and best memories of DXing were not made at home. They were made by getting together to DX with other hobbyists such as we did back in college.

Nowadays when I get together to DX with other hobbyists it’s to go on a DXpedition, which is nothing more than taking your receiver to a place where DXing will be better than at home because there’s less noise and you can erect better antennas. Simple DXpeditions can be done from cars. My old friend Dave Valko used to go on what he called micro-DXpeditions. He drove to a remote spot in the mountains not far from town, laid out a few hundred feet of wire, and then DXed from his car for a couple hours. He frequently did this around dawn and around sunset and got some great DX. I know several other DXers that do this today, either at countryside locations or in large parks.

I’ve done micro-DXpeditions a few times. It’s fun but it always lacks an important element: other DXers. For me, the best DXpeditions aren’t just about hearing interesting stuff (although that is very important). They are also about sharing the hobby with other interested friends. And the best way to do that is to go on a real DXpedition with them.

For three years in a row prior to the pandemic a group of eight of us had rented a lodge in rural central Ohio for an annual DXpedition. Covid shelved our plans for 2020 but by the summer of 2021 we were all looking forward to a fourth DXpedition in September. Then another wave of covid swept across the country and we canceled a few weeks before the event. Fortunately, the worst of those days are behind us and we finally had our fourth DXpedition the first week of October of this year. Unfortunately, only five of us could make it – Ralph Brandi, Mike Nikolich, Andy Robins, Mark Taylor and I.

For four nights our DXpedition home was the same place in western Pennsylvania that we had canceled at in 2021. The location was a rural house on the bluffs overlooking the Allegheny River near the old East Sandy railroad bridge (now a hiking trail). It’s always a gamble going to a new place chosen solely based on the AirBnB listing and other information found online. But this site had all the appearances of being a good place to DX from. The pictures and Google satellite view showed that there were trees around the house and large nearby open fields surrounded by woodland. The terrain was relatively flat when viewed on 3D satellite view. We would have plenty of space for a variety of antennas. Furthermore, it didn’t look to be a noisy location. The nearest neighbor was over a quarter mile to the south and because the house was the last one on the road that powerlines stopped at the driveway. I couldn’t have done much better if I had designed the location myself.

Our DXpedition home. Coordinates 41°19’23″N 79°46’08″W (Don Moore)

ANTENNAS

Good antennas are the most important part of any DXpedition and erecting them is usually the most time-consuming part of set-up. Still, you never really know what’s going to fit until you’re there. I arrived at 2 p.m. and Mark pulled in a few minutes later. We immediately walked the grounds and were pleased with what we saw. Ralph arrived while we were laying out the first antenna. Mike and Andy arrived later in the afternoon in time to help finish up.

Our DXpedition antenna farm consisted of two delta loops, a DKaz, and two BOGs. The delta loops used Wellbrook ALA-100LN units and are as I described a few years ago in my article on radio travel. These are easy to erect and are good all-around antennas for anything below 30 MegaHertz. The DKaz (instructions here) is a rather complex-to-build antenna designed for medium wave. Ralph uses one at home which he had taken down for the summer to make yard work easier. He brought the pieces and put it up by himself. The two BOGs (Beverage-on-the-ground) were a 300-meter wire to the northeast and a 220-meter wire to the north. Beverages are good for long wave, medium wave, and the lower shortwave frequencies. Continue reading

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Born in the ER: Andrew’s portable SULA antenna

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Andrew (VK2ZRK), who writes:

Just thought I would share some pics of my SULA build which I constructed in the Emergency department’s antenna building section in between catastrophies here in Australia.

I built it out of 8mm fibreglass tube from a kite supply, 8mm kite nocks, 13mm equal cross irrigation fitting and lots of double wall glue lined heat shrink. The 8mm tube with a short bit of heat shrink is a slip fit into the id of the 13mm equal cross which I secured with more heat shrink.

I then cut the frame to length allowing for the length of the kite nocks. I secured the kite nocks with more heat shrink. I then soldered the resister to 2 lengths of Davis RF 12g antenna wire and fed this through the kite nocks terminating it at the nooelec balun on the opposite side to the resistor.

I think it worked out well. It is very light. I built it to use with my SDRPlay RSPdx.

Thank you to everyone involved in the design process and for providing it to the swling.com community.

Cheers
Andrew VK2ZRK

In all the years I’ve been hosting the SWLing Post, I can safely say that we’ve never featured an antenna constructed in an Emergency Department of a hospital. Thank you, Andrew!

The feedback from the SULA antenna build has been phenomenal. The three-part series detailing the SULA antenna from concept to build was the most popular of 2022 on the SWLing Post

Thank you for sharing the photos of your antenna. What a professional job, Andrew!

Readers, if you’d like to learn more about the SULA antenna, check out this three-part series–a collaboration between the amazing Grayhat and 13dka.

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Guest Post: 10 Meter Beacon DXing

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Walter Salmaniw, who shares the following guest post:


10 Meter Beacon DXing

by Walter Salmaniw, Masset, BC

My hobby of radio listening has evolved over the years.  Beginning with crystal radios as a child in the 60s, I’ve migrated through SWLing with numerous rigs including the kings of valve technology, like the Collins R390A and Racal RA17, and then on to high end mil-spec solid state rigs:  Racals, Harris, Ten-Tec, and my all-time favourite, the Rockwell-Collins HF-2050 receiver.   Unfortunately, broadcast band stations, especially transmitting to North America, have dwindled over the years, and my favourite Pacific stations also disappeared:  120 and 90 meter Indonesians, the 60 meter AIR network, and the numerous PNG stations.  Well, what’s one to do?

About 10 years ago, I switched over to MW DXing, and especially trans-Pacific and trans-Atlantic DX.  My cottage near Masset, BC is the ideal location for such DXing, as I have an ocean beach location, the room for some great antennas, and very low noise in the area.  This has produced some incredible DX, and I’ve been honoured with visits by some pretty eminent DXers, including Victor Goonetilleke from Sri Lanka, Mauno Ritola from Norway, Vlad Titarev from Ukraine, as well as our own experts in DXing from Victoria and the Pacific North-West of the US.

MW DXing is great, but that involves DXing primarily during the night time and early morning hours.  What to do with the rest of the day?  Well, with the rising sunspot counts and heading toward the peak of the next solar cycle, why not look at 10 meters?  About 2 years ago, with a lot of help from the local DX geniuses, I was able to remote my set-up in Masset, and DX even when at home in Victoria, BC.  10 meters has consistently remained open almost every afternoon.  Now, I’m not a ham, and at this point, have no interest in obtaining my ham license.  However, I noted a lot of beacon activity on 10 meters.

I’ve dabbled in LW NDB DX, which can be a lot of fun.  Why not do something similar on the higher frequencies?   Not being a ham, I needed some help with decoding the beacons.  Thankfully, one can often see the CW and it’s slow enough to read in many cases.  Being a bit too lazy for that exercise, though, I’ve tried several software solutions to use with my KiwiSDR and Perseus SDR in Masset.  Fldigi is probably best known, and works fairly well.  Another program I use is MixW, which I’ve always liked for SSTV reception.  Another is CW Decoder.   None, however, get anywhere close to how well CW Skimmer works.  It’s an awesome program, albeit a pricey one.  I’m still in the test phase, but will likely go ahead and fork over the $75 to purchase this.  It will even take control of my Perseus receiver and decode 192 kHz worth of spectrum.  Wow!

     Here’s an example of what the band looked like last weekend:

There happened to have been a world-wide CW DX competition, but nonetheless, there were literally hundreds of CW signals to be decoded!  Now, for me, however, I was more interested in the Beacon region of 10 M which is roughly between 28150 and 28300 kHz.  I’ve found CW Skimmer to be a perfect tool to decode the beacons.  Not only is it very accurate, but one can also easily see the CW signal with the dahs and dits on the screen and a continual readout of the messages.  Most of these beacons run 5 or 10 W, and all are run by amateurs.  Where to find information about who they belong to?  That’s easy as well.  WI5V.net has a great 10 M beacon list at https://wi5v.net/beacon-list-table-version/ .  That’s my go to, but I also have DL8WX.de’s beacon list on my laptop, giving even more information, like contact e-mails, etc.  He’s found at:  http://www.dl8wx.de/BAKE_KW.HTM

What type of antenna do I use?  Well, none of mine are 10 M antennas at all.  Most are, in fact, for DXing trans-oceanic MW DX!  Still, they seem to work quite well.  My go-to has been a DKAZ antenna aimed 290 degrees.  Now, that’s 180 deg to where most of my Beacon activity comes from.  How come?  Well, Nick Hall-Patch, MW DXer extraordinaire, used his ENZEC antenna prediction program to see how the DKAZ works on 28 MHz, and sure enough, it’s opposite to MW DX.  On the lower band, it’s best aimed 290 deg, but 180 deg opposite on 28 MHz!   Who would have guessed that one?  In any case, the next time I’m in Masset, I plan on putting up a simple vertical for 10 meters, seeing that solar max is still a year or two away, so there’s plenty of time for some fun DX!

Here’s what I’ve heard with a few afternoons of listening.  My best catch has been Darwin, Australia!

28207   N4XRO  1924  CW  5 watt beacon heard with a bit of a buzzy signal best deciphered on my 110 deg DKAZ….  17/Oct/2022 (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28236.5   W0KIZ  1933  CW  Another well heard beacon this morning giving ID in CW along with location.  Also very strong at 23:11 recheck.  Almost a barn burner!  Not bad for 5 watts! 17/Oct/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28244   WA6APQ  1934  CW  Much stronger, and it shows with their 30 watts output, with slow CW giving callsign, then location. Very strong when rechecking at 23:05 UTC.  Frequency is actually a little lower than listed.  Actually measuring 28243.942 kHz.  17/Oct/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28287   WI6J  1949  CW  Poor reception, but with same format giving ID and location.    17/Oct/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28250   K0HTF  2248  CW  Fairly good copy of this beacon away from the coast now in Iowa.  Only giving callsign/B.  Tom ‘Doc’ Gruis

replyed to my email confirming he’s feeding 20 Watts from an Old President radio and feeding an AR-10 antenna.  Thanks, Doc!  17/Oct/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28248.3   NJ5T  2258  CW  A relatively difficult catch, but I decoded the J5 part of his call, as well as ‘dipole’.   17/Oct/2022 (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28215   KA9SZX  1954  CW  Beacon quite well heard from Masset.  Most of my 10 meter beacon loggings have been a more N/S axis, but this one is coming in nicely in our early afternoon.  Callsign and power listed as 3 W, along with his email address. 5/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28218   AC0KC  2035  CW  Despite being listed as on 28218.5, he’s actually on the even channel at fair level into Masset.  Solar powered and only 3W, into a Bazooka antenna (what’s that?). Call sign repeated.  5/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28220   AA8HS  2123  CW  Despite listed as 30 Hz higher, I’m hearing them on the even channel with repeated IDs.  Fair level. Antenna listed is a vertical J-Pole.  5/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28230.3   W2MQO  2125  CW  Strong reception with call sign as W2MQ0/B repeated twice, then tones, and cycle repeats.  Into a Bazooka Antenna.  5/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28203   KG8C0  2132  CW  Another strong beacon with call sign, and prolonged tone, and repeat.  5/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28203.5   K6LL  2134  CW  Strong signal also from California, ID’ing as K6LLL/BCN, and giving location and QSL info.    5/Nov/2022 (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28193   VE4ARM  1827  CW  Excellent reception of my first 10 meter Canadian Beacon.  Run by the Austin, MD Amateur Radio Museum, as outlined in their beacon text.  6/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28284.8   N9TNY  2226  CW  Another new one for me from Illinois.  Not a particularly great afternoon, but nonetheless, a number of CW Beacons on 10 meters are visible/audible.  Callsign is given, then PSE RST.  Not sure what that means?  Wiki tells me that this is like SIO or SINPO code.  Stands for Readability-Signal Strength-Tone.  Hmm.  28/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28297   NS9RC  2237  CW  Another Illinois Beacon audible.  This one is weak, but fiddling with the KiwiSDR AGC settings, makes for a much better decode (mostly raising the CW Threshold (marked Thresh CW in the AGC section).  Near 100% correct decode now. Chicago is sent along with call sign.    28/Nov/2022 (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28287   WI6J  2240  CW  Strong signal from this Californian, and heard before.  VVV VI6J/B Bakersfield CA DM 5     28/Nov/2022 (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28254.5   K4JEE  2243  CW  Good copy with VVV DE K4JEE/B K4JEE/B K4JEE/B LOUISVILLE, KY  28/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28236.5   W0KIZ  2300  CW  Always one of the strongest beacons on 10 meters, and not disappointing this afternoon.  VVV W0KIZ/B DENVER, COLORADO . 5 WATTS, So does he mean 5 or 0.5 Watts? Presumably 5 Watts.  28/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28206.5   KA7TXS/B  2303  CW  Nice reception with VVV DE KA7TXS/B DM22 Listed in dl8wx.de website, but not the primary one I use (wi5v.net Beacon Website).  28/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28209   N5TIT/B  2315  CW  Fair reception with VVV DE N5TIT/B EM1UPX, or something similar.  28/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28211.8   AC7GZ  2321  CW  Good reception for only 3 W with VVV DE AC7GZ AC7GZ AC7GZ DM3BI.    The latter is the ham grid square, near Mesa, AZ.  28/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28232.3   W7SWL  2323  CW  I like the callsign!  Fair reception with VV DE W7SWL TUCSON AZ DM42  The band is fading fast.  Fascinating that the best antenna for 10 m Beacon reception today is my 290 deg DKAZ (and not the 110 deg DKAZ).  Not sure why! 28/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28206.5   N4SO  2231  CW  Very weak, but really picked up just now.  DE N4SO/B repeated. A fine catch!    30/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28212.8   AC7GZ  2253  CW  Very strong reception with VVV DE AC7GZ AC7GZ AC7GZ DM43BI  30/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28209.5   N2UHC  2300  CW  Tough copy, but bits of STPAUL decoded. as well as N2UHC/B.    30/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28254.5   K4JEE  2308  CW  Strong reception with ID and location.  Deep fades, as well, though.  30/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28255.8   WI5V  2310  CW  Fair reception with occasional good fade-ups with WI5V/B repeated.  30/Nov/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28175.5   VE3BKM  2034  CW  Hearing an unlisted beacon.  VE3BKM/BCN repeated, often at strong level.  A new one for me! 5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28168   VA3KAH  2040  CW  I have no idea where this island is located, so had to look it up.  Fair reception with VV DE VA3DAH/B It’s located to the north of Lake Simcoe in southern Ontario. 5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28145   DL2WB  2048  CW  A highly tentative logging.  All I hear is the occasional tone for several seconds, then off.  Nothing else listed on this frequency, so no idea!  5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28203   KG8CO  2055  CW  Very strong signal with repeated KG8CO/BT 5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28203.5   K6LLL  2058  CW  Weak reception with VVV K6LLL/BC Grid Square coordinates, and PSE QSL TNX DE K6LL/BCN.  5/Dec/2022 (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28206.3   KA7TXS  2100  CW  Strong reception, although a bit of a congested part of the band making decodes a tad difficult. Not listed on my main source (WI5V Beacon website), but it is on the dl8wx.de website.  5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28208   WD5GLO  2126  CW  Fair copy with WD5GLO/B repeated 3 times and OK OK  5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28209.1   N5TIT  2130  CW  Poor reception this afternoon, but making out the call-sign.  VVV DE N5TIT/B.  100 Hz higher than listed.    5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28209.5   N2UHC  2133  CW  Poor reception, but seeing his callsign. Fades up to quite good at times.  N2UHC/B EM27JM N2UHC/B ST PAUL KS.  5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28212.1   AC7GZ  2140  CW  A regular visitor to Masset.  Fair to good this afternoon with VVV DE AC7GZ DM43BI  5/Dec/2022 (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28215   KA9SZX  2142  CW  A slower rate beacon at good reception:  VVVV KA9SZX KA9SZX KA9SZX BCN MACOMB IL PWR 3W GRID EN40PK EMAIL KA9SZXWAYAHOO.COM  Now that’s a full information beacon! 5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28217.7   K4PAR  2152  CW  Very weak, but fully decodable with VV DE K4PAR/B.  Listed as from the Piedmont ARC and 25 W.  Just barely audible.  5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28220.15   AA8HS  2155  CW  Measuring below their listed 28.2203 frequency.  Weak but in the clear.  5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28232.3   W7SWL  2206  CW  Now that’s a call-sign!  He wasn’t there a few minutes ago, but noticed a very powerful beacon.  VVV DE W7SWL W7SWL TUCSON AZ DM42 and repeated.    5/Dec/2022 (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28254.5   K4JEE  2220  CW  Another beacon I recognize from previous sessions.  Fair to good reception this afternoon with VVV DE K4JEE/B K4JEE/B K4JEE/B LOUISVILLE, KU EM78.  5/Dec/2022 (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28255.8   WI5V  2226  CW  Weak reception, with some AM QRM.  VVV DE WI5V/B   5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28278.5   WA4OTD  2228  CW  Weak, but in the clear with callsign and location.    5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28280   K5AB  2231  CW  Strong reception with DE K5AB EM01BEACON, repeated, then CENTRAL TEXAS  5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28281.1   W8EH  2234  CW  100 Hz above their listed frequency at fair level with callsign and grid square reference.    5/Dec/2022 (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28284.8   N9TNY  2237  CW  Strong reception with callsign and grid square reference.  5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28236.5   W0KIZ  2243  CW  Again, a beacon not there a few minutes ago, but really burning up the receiver with repeated VVV DE W0KIZ/B DENVER COLORADO 5 WATTS.  5/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28240   W8EDU/B  2223  CW  Weak, but readable.  For only a watt, I’m impressed!  Giving callsign and grid square location.  Found them on the dl8wx.de beacon website.  Location and operator is the Case Western Reserve University amateur radio club. 8/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28252.5   WD8INF  2227  CW  Good reception with callsign and grid square locatioon (EM79).  8/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28258.5   AC5JM  2229  CW  Good copy with callsign and OK repeated. 8/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28277.56   WA4OTD  2232  CW  Fair copy.  Listed in the WI5V beacon website on 28.2788, so a bit lower in reality.  Giving callsign, grid square, and CARMEL  8/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28281.1   W8EH  2235  CW  Good reception with callsign and grid square (EM79).  Clearly, Ohio is coming in well this afternoon. Normally I’m hearing AC7AV on or near this channel (Green Acres, WA).    8/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28284.8   N9TNY  2237  CW  Strong signal with VVV DE N9TNY/B EN51 PSE RST.  8/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28271   W4ZZK  2245  CW  A very weak signal heard while monitoring another very adjacent signal.  , giving the callsign/B.  CW Skimmer comes through again!  8/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28290.8   K5TLJ  2302  CW  Weak reception, but able to copy AR AR AR DE K5TLJ/B K5TLJ/B K5TLJ/B AR   Band is quickly fading, so looks like this is the top frequency beacon I can hear now. 8/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28250   K5AB  2341  CW  A this late hour, very little propagating in the 10M Beacon band.  Nonetheless, good reception from this high power beacon with DE D5AB EM01BEACON DE D5AB CENTRAL TEXAS.    14/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28268.334   VK8VF  2344  CW  My first Australian beacon!   Very weak, but the call sign is being decoded by CW Skimmer.  Not even visible on the waterfall.  334 Hz high compared to the listed 28.268 on the WI5V Beacon website.    14/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28189   VE4TEN  2100  CW  Great reception this afternoon.  The band had many 10 M beacons, but unfortunately, I had other family matters today.  Still, nabbed this one, with an interesting call, and flea powered as well.    18/Dec/2022  (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

28193    LU2DT  2355  CW  My surprise for the afternoon, and my first Argentinian beacon.  Fair reception.  Long, somewhat garbled tone, followed by VV DE LU2DT LU2DT GF12FA.  Distance approximately 12,432 kM with bearing 125 degrees!  19/Dec/2022 (Salmaniw, Masset, BC)

I hope that I’ve wetted your appetite into trying something, “completely different” in our radio monitoring hobby.  Who knows next what I’ll want to try!

Walter Salmaniw, Masset and Victoria, BC

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Video: Giuseppe’s “Cassette Loop” on the shortwaves with induction

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Giuseppe Morlè (IZ0GZW), who writes:

Dear Thomas and Friends of the SWLing Post,

I’m Giuseppe Morlè from central Italy, Formia on the Tyrrhenian Sea…

My Cassette Loop experiment this time shows how induction takes place on short waves after medium waves.

I used a smaller box as the primary antenna which, however, is pushed by the secondary one due to the induction effect generated between the two windings brought closer together.

This way, the larger loop “captures” more of the signal and sends it to the smaller cassette…

I really like working on induction… I hope you like it:

Click here to view on YouTube.

Thanks and greetings from central Italy.
73. Giuseppe Morlè iz0gzw.

Thank you so much for sharing this, Giuseppe!

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DIY on Shortwave

Hi SWLing post community from Fastradioburst23. Just when you thought it was safe to put that canvas toolbag away, the Imaginary Stations team have a DIY related broadcast on Sunday 11th December 2022 via WRMI on 9395 kHz at 2300 hrs UTC.

There will be toolshed related tunes, advice on repairing stuff around the home “without the direct aid of professionals or certified experts” and tips and tricks from various handymen and women from around the globe. So plug in that homebrew radio, tune it in and enjoy!

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Tom’s Recommendations: Earbuds and EQ Settings for Shortwave Listening

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, TomL, who shares the following guest post:


Earbuds for Shortwave Listening

by TomL

A few years ago I had bought the discontinued Sennheiser MM 50 earbuds for a cheap price on Amazon to use in my various radios.  The portable radios in particular can use more fidelity because of their small, raspy speakers.  I also like to listen without bothering others around me who might not want to listen.  And earbuds are a LOT more comfortable for my ear lobes than any over-the-ear headphones I have ever used.  Furthermore, the old Apple iPhone 4 earbuds were very harsh to listen to.  However, a trade-off is that, generally, earbuds are somewhat fragile; one of the two pairs of MM50’s died through mishandling.

I was generally happy with them while listening to Shortwave broadcasters with a mix of news/talk and music.  I especially liked them on Mediumwave listening; stations can sound surprisingly good when playing music.  Then I tried using these earbuds on my Amateur Radio transceiver, a Kenwood TS-590S.  I was impressed how clear they sounded with a lack of distortion, although there was too much bass.  Fortunately, Kenwood supplies USB connected software with an TX & RX 18 band EQ (300 Hz spacing, not octaves).

Here is a frequency response chart I found from Reviewed.com for this model:

One of the notable things about these earbuds is the total lack of distortion.  Most likely one of the reasons they sound so clear on Shortwave, which has many LOUD audio spikes.

I had not wanted to get Bluetooth earbuds.  However, I had recently upgraded my cell phone and NO headphone jacks anymore!  So, while I do not use Bluetooth yet for radios, I can see a time in the future to get a Bluetooth transmitter to plug into a radio with a headphone jack.  I am reluctant since I do not like having to recharge my earbuds and I put in a lot of radio listening time.  Am I supposed to buy two Bluetooth earbuds and swap while charging?  Maybe in the future.  And also, am I supposed to buy a Bluetooth transmitter for every non-Bluetooth radio I own?  Not likely gonna happen.

In the meantime, I ordered cheap wired earbuds from Amazon.  I had a $5 credit for trying Prime, so when I saw these Panasonic ErgoFit wired earbuds (RP-HJE120-K) for slightly over $10, I said to myself, “why not?”.   Supposedly wildly popular, they are one of the most rated products on all of Amazon with 133,821 ratings/opinions (perhaps Russian bots?!?!?).

Here is a frequency response chart from ThePhonograph.com for these Panasonic earbuds:

You can see comparatively that the bass response in the very good Sennheiser MM50’s is much stronger, being good music earbuds.  But for voice articulation, not as much, even though they have no distortion.  The Panasonic ErgoFit’s have more modest bass, less of a dip in the lower midrange audio frequencies, and more importantly, has a peak near 2500 Hz and its harmonic 5000 Hz.  The highest highs are also modest compared to the Sennheiser model.  This general frequency response to “recess” the bass and treble frequencies and peak the 2500 Hz is very useful for voice intelligibility.

As described by the famous speaker-microphone-sound-system maker, Bob Heil relates what he learned from the scientists at Bell Labs many years ago.  Speech intelligibility is enhanced when audio is compensated for our natural human hearing.  Equalizing below 160 Hz, reducing the 600-900 Hz region, and peaking the 2000-3000 region centered at 2500 Hz will increase intelligibility dramatically.  The story goes that Bell Labs was tasked by parent AT&T with finding out why the earliest phones in the 1920’s sounded so muffled and hard to understand.  After many experiments, the scientists found the most important frequencies for our ears + brain to comprehend speech.  In other words, our ears are not “EQ-flat” like a scientific instrument is. Continue reading

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