Monthly Archives: April 2019

The New Jersey Antique Radio Club YouTube channel needs your help

NJARC Members (Source: NJARC)

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Dennis Dura, who recently shared this video where “Radio Wild” asks his viewers to subscribe to the New Jersey Antique Radio Club (NJARC) YouTube channel.

Evidently, the NJARC has been posting live video feeds of their meetings and events for quite some time, but recently YouTube changed their policy and now requires a minimum of 1,000 subscribers for live feeds. At time of posting, my subscription brought their number to 700–they need at least 300 more.

If you’d like to support the NJARC (and learn a thing or two about radio restoration–!), consider subscribing to their channel.

Click here to visit the NJARC YouTube channel and subscribe.

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RFI: “The power of radio during British-mandated Palestine”

Radio engineer Moshe Rubin transmits the special broadcast during the opening of the Palestine Broadcasting Service, Ramallah, March 30, 1936. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, via RFI

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Alan Roe, who writes:

There is an interesting article/podcast by R France Int
entitled “The power of radio during British-mandated Palestine”.

“On 30 March 1936, the British High Commissioner of Palestine, Arthur
Wauchope, inaugurated the Palestinian Broadcasting Service, the PBS. It
was the second broadcaster to be established in the Middle East, after
Radio Cairo in 1934, and featured programmes in Arabic, Hebrew and English.

It covered the region of Palestine, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon, as well
as parts of Egypt. The new transmitter was in Ramallah and the
broadcasting offices were in Jerusalem.”

Full article and pictures at:

http://en.rfi.fr/middle-east/20190329-power-radio-during-british-mandated-palestine

Fascinating! Thank you for sharing this with us, Alan!

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2019 Marks the 100th Anniversary of Radio in the Netherlands

Former RNW headquarters in Hilversum, Netherlands (photo coutesty: RNW)

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Bill (WD9EQD), who shares the following:

Hi Thomas,

You probably already know this, but 2019 is the 100 anniversary of radio in the Netherlands

Jonathan Marks of the Media Networks programs has a nice article about some of the history of radio Netherlands:

View at Medium.com

Click here to view.

There’s also the Media Networks Vault where you can listen to many of the original Media Networks programs:

https://jonathanmarks.libsyn.com/

For real Radio Netherland Fans, from the archives, there is an eight part audio series on the 50th anniversary:

Click here to read.

The Internet Archive is probably an easier place to down load the eight part series [we’ve also embedded each audio file below]:

Part 1:

Part 2:

Part 3:

Part 4:

Part 5:

Part 6:

Part 7:

Part 8:

Click here to listen via the Internet Archive.

Fascinating Listening.

Thanks so much for sharing this, Bill! Indeed-these are some amazing resources to explore the rich history of radio in the Netherlands!

 

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Radio World: “Australia Still Has Shortwave Voices”

(Source: Radio World via Michael Bird)

HANS JOHNSON ? APR 23, 2019

SYDNEY — Radio Australia shortwave services may be dead, but the medium is alive and well on the continent.

Reach Beyond Australia is on shortwave, but with its Christian programming largely in foreign languages, it really isn’t seen as representing Australia on the shortwaves. But there are other private Australian stations that are broadcasting and more are planned.

And while these stations are not a replacement for Radio Australia’s international transmissions or the defunct (for the moment) Australian Broadcasting Corp. domestic service, they do have various goals and share certain characteristics.[…]

4KZ is a shortwave relay of an Innisfail, Queensland, medium-wave station with the same call sign. It is part of the NQ Radio network. 4KZ plays a variety of music and is heavily involved in the community. The shortwave serves remote areas of north Queensland. “We are planning a 90-or 120-meter service for evenings local time, from station 4AM in Mareeba,” explained Al Kirton, NQ Radio’s general manager.

Unique Radio has been on three years and currently broadcasts from Gunnedah in New South Wales. Its owner, Tim Gaylor, has a background in community radio. “We like a station to inform people about alternative subject matters not currently on mainstream media,” he said. Unique Radio also plans to add a night frequency in the 90-meter band.

There are also future stations in the works from New South Wales.[…]

Click here to read the full article at Radio World.

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“AM radio matters more than you might think”

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mark Fahey, who shares the following piece from Politico:

The Lo-Fi Voices That Speak for America

For decades, AM radio has felt as commonplace as a utility, such a basic fact of life that it’s taken for granted. But that’s changing: Across America, AM radio stations are dwindling in number and profitability, as better-sounding FM signals become cheaper to broadcast and would-be listeners turn to the internet for entertainment.

Yet even in decline, it has a strength that politicians and media insiders who want to understand America would do well to heed. In 2019, thousands of AM stations remain on the air, many of them thriving—in part because they serve unique sets of people whose voices aren’t always heard loudly. For generations, it was considerably cheaper to buy or start an AM station than any other form of mass media, making ownership more accessible to people of color, immigrants, non-English speakers and those with political views outside the mainstream. Without the line-of-sight restrictions of FM radio, AM radio can also cover vast geographic areas, and so remains a staple of rural media. Even now, if you tune into the right frequency on a clear summer night, you can hear a broadcast from half a continent away—listening in on the kinds of conversations that shape identity and politics far outside the Beltway.[…]

Click here to read the full article and view photos at Politico.

 

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