Category Archives: Broadcasters

All India Radio: Teaching students English via radio

(Southgate ARC via Eric McFadden)

The Hindu reports the news broadcasts from All India Radio are being used to teach students English

To make learning English interesting and interactive for high school students, the district administration has undertaken a novel initiative.

All 149 high schools, 11 Kasturba Gandhi Balika Vidyalayas and 11 model schools in the district have been instructed to implement All India Radio (AIR) English news listening programme as part of listening enhancement programme, English learning and general awareness development activities for students of class 8 and 9.

The students are required to tune in to the five-minute English news broadcast at 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. every day in their respective classrooms and note down the points.

hat is followed by simple questions and discussions for another five minutes in the class to check their IQ levels, vocabulary, general knowledge and grasp on current affairs.

Radio on phone

All schools are equipped with radios, which were produced a few years ago when the government implemented ‘Meena prapancham’ radio telecast programme on adolescent girls’ education. In case the schools don’t have a radio, teachers are asked to use cell phones for tuning in to radio news.

Read the full story at
https://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-tamilnadu/they-learn-english-by-hearing-the-news-on-radio/article25431278.ece

All India Radio
http://allindiaradio.gov.in/Services/External/Pages/Default.aspx

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Radio Romania celebrates 90 years

(Source: Radio Romania International via David Iurescia)

On November 1, Radio Romania celebrates 90 years since a first broadcast was aired in Romania. Since then, the institution has constantly coped with the challenges of a changing world.

A decade after WWI, when all the territories with a predominantly Romanian speaking population that had been under the rule of neighbouring multinational empires got under Bucharest’s authority, Romania started using the most efficient means of communication of the time – Radio – which could reach all corners of the newly united country.

On November 1, 1928, “the Romanian Radio-Telephony Broadcasting Company” aired its first broadcast, “Hello, this is Radio Bucharest” being the first words uttered on air by the first president of the institution, physicist  Dragomir Hurmuzescu. Regarded from the very beginning as a means of information, education and entertainment, the Romanian public radio has practically broadcast programs uninterruptedly for 90 years.  It had to permanently adjust its editorial policy, sometimes paying a dear political price, but it has overcome the challenges posed by radical changes of regime, which Romania has seen from inter-war democracy to right wing dictatorships during WWII and from Communist despotism to democracy, restored during the December 1989 Revolution.

Radio Romania addresses the whole society, all generations, catering for all tastes, and along the years it has tried to preserve unaltered the image of an unbiased national public radio. The channels with a national coverage include “Actualit??i”, “Cultural”, “Muzical” and “Antena Satelor”, that is “News and Current Affairs”, “Culture”, “Music” and “the Village Antenna”, respectively, adding to which are two online channels for children and youth. The Romanian public radio started broadcasting programs for audiences abroad in the early 1930’s. Nowadays, Radio Romania International is trying to familiarize foreign audience with current Romanian topical issues and values, and to keep the Romanian Diaspora in touch with the mother-country, helping them maintain the bond with Romania. Radio Romania International broadcasts programmes in 11 foreign languages (Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Serbian, Spanish, Russian, Ukrainian) as well as in the Romanian language and the Aromanian dialect.

The Romanian Radio Broadcasting Corporation is currently considered to be  the most credible and important media institution in the country, given the large number of listeners who choose to listen to its programmes on a daily basis, the campaigns it carries out and the extensive cultural projects that it develops.  The daily reach of Radio Romania stands at over 4.5 million listeners, with a  market share of 30%. On the occasion of the 90th anniversary of the public radio station, Defence Minister Mihai Fifor, has awarded the “Defence Partner-Emblem of Merit 1st Class” to the “Current and News Affairs” Channel of the Romanian Radio Broadcasting Corporation. The high distinction has been  offered in token of appreciation for the constant support granted by Radio Romania in an effort to promote  the image of the Romanian Army. Also, as a sign of appreciation for serving the public for the past 90 years, at the Film’s Gala in Bucharest, Radio Romania received a trophy from the Bucharest Chamber of Commerce.

Click here to read the full article via Radio Romania International.

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Vatican Radio notes shortwave frequency changes

Vintage Vatican Radio QSL

(Source: Vatican Radio via Mike Hansgen)

Shortwave Frequency Changes for the English Africa Service starting on 28 October 2018 to March/April 2019

Daylight saving time in Rome
We wish to inform listeners that with the end of Daylight Saving Time in Rome on Sunday 28th October, there will be changes in the time and broadcast frequencies of the English Africa Service.

The programme will be going on air one hour earlier at 16.30 UTC (GMT) on the following shortwave frequencies: 11625 kHz (25mb) and 13830 kHz (21mb)

It will be repeated at 20.00 hours UTC on 6010 kHz (49mb) and the 7365 kHz (40 mb).

Listeners in Rome
For listeners in Rome and the Vatican who have a digital radio receiver, the ‘English Africa Programme’ can be heard on Vatican News’ World Channel on digital radio DAB+ at 17.30 Rome time and the repeat broadcast at 21.00 hours Rome time.

Listen to and download our daily Podcast from anywhere in the world
To listen to the Podcast of our programme throughout the day, just log on to our websitewww.vaticannews.va, click on English and then from right hand side of the page; click on “listen to our podcasts” and choose ‘English for Africa’.

Catholic Radio Stations in Africa retransmit our daily programme
On the continent, the main outlet for our daily English Africa programmes will continue to be through the re-transmission of our daily broadcasts by several Catholic radio stations.

Most of these radio stations are owned by various African Catholic dioceses, parishes, religious congregations and some by the Radio Maria network.

We thank you all for this important collaboration.

For further information kindly contact the English Africa Service through email: engafrica@spc.va or by phone: (+39) 06 69883892.

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A great resource for finding over-the-air stations in the US

Yesterday, a friend asked about tips for finding local radio stations throughout the US. His goal was to identify stations that he could then load into his WiFi radio and stream from abroad.

Of course there are always online radio station aggregators like TuneIn, but often you either need to know the station ID or name in advance to perform a search. Not all stations can be recalled with a geographic search either–especially if it’s a small local station that doesn’t market their online stream.

SWLing Post contributor, Gary Donnelly, recently shared the following searchable FCC database that lists all licensed stations on the air.

Search for:

Gary found this comprehensive database a great way to sniff out smaller LPFM and community stations to DX on FM and AM.

Post readers: Are there other resources you use to find over-the-air stations throughout the world?  Please comment to share your links and tips.

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Switzerland ending RF terrestrial broadcasting of television

Television TV

Photo by Ajeet Mestry on Unsplash

(Source: Fortune via Mark Fahey)

Switzerland Is Doing Away With Over-the-Air TV. Could the U.S. Do the Same?

Rabbit ears and other TV antennas could be useless in Switzerland before too long.

The Swiss government has given the country’s public broadcaster approval to turn off its digital terrestrial TV (known as over-the-air to most people) by the end of 2019. It will be the first nation in Europe to do so.

Most Swiss have high speed broadband internet connections and cable networks in their homes, so the move is unlikely to affect many citizens. Only 1.9% of the population, about 64,000 people, reportedly take advantage of the service that’s being discontinued.

Other European nations are expected to follow Switzerland’s lead in the next 10 to 15 years. And while many Americans believe the right to free, over-the-air broadcasts are protected, that’s not quite as cut and dry as it might seem.

Yes, the federal government licenses the airwaves to television stations (among other entities). […]But the government doesn’t license networks, only individual stations, as outlined by the FCC.

“We license only individual broadcast stations,”: the agency says in a 2008 report explaining its authority.

[…]Put another way: Networks are not required to broadcast their shows over the air.[…]

Click here to read the full article at Fortune.

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