Tag Archives: What’s On Shortwave

Radio Northern Europe International and This is a Music Show broadcasts

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Roseanna, who shares the following announcement posted on her blog [with apologies for the late plug!]:

Radio Northern Europe International has worked with This is a Music Show to make a broadcast consisting of 30 minutes of RNEI and 30 minutes of TIAMS, that’s 1 hour of great music!

We really love what TIAMS has made for us and we can’t wait to share it with you!!

Radio Northern Europe International show #2 will have music from Iceland, Norway, Ireland, Sweden, Denmark and Finland this month, I really love the music we are playing and we hope to introduce you to some new music this month!
Songs 4,5 and 6 are my favourites this show!

Broadcast Times:
We have good news to those of you not in Europe and those of you nearer the transmitter, multiple times throughout the month! RNEI #2 will broadcast 5 times on 6070 kHz at the following times:

Saturday the 7th of March 2020, 10-11UTC
Saturday the 7th of March 2020, 19-20UTC
Friday the 13th of March 2020, 11-12UTC
Saturday the 21st of March 2020, 19-20UTC
Sunday the 29th of March 2020, 01-02UTC (this time is very experimental!)

Digital modes:
In RNEI Show #2 the final song will have the MFSK32 embedded into it. This time: text, Emoji and some Icelandic art! (Note, an app like TIVAR shows the emoji!)
TIAMS’ contribution will contain some MFSK64 text and an MFSK64 image!
Many thanks to one of our listeners for suggesting our final MFSK song!

Audio Processing:
This show Daz has been working hard making an audio processor to try and expand the audio range of RNEI! We have decided on trying to broadcast a flat signal to combat the noise floor. This means that the highs might come across a bit too bright and the bass might feel bit lacking.
Don’t worry, a little bit of EQ on the receiver should reverse it ending up with a better frequency range than before! Most standalone radios should already apply a high frequency reduction however SDRs can omit this!

You can send your reception reports, feedback and suggestions for RNEI to qsl@rnei.org!
Wishing you good reception conditions and all the best,
-Roseanna

For more info, check out Roseanna’s blog.

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Radio Northern Europe International on shortwave

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Roseanna, who shares the following announcement posted on her blog:

(Source: The Girl With The Radio)

I would like to share something very exciting that I’ve been working on since May 2019:
Radio Northern Europe International

RNEI will be the station for pop and dance music from Northern Europe on shortwave playing music from Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, Finland, the UK and Ireland!

I aim to play music you haven’t heard before and the first show features a very exciting experiment: Embedded MFSK64! This means, hidden in the final song, there will be the song list sent in MFSK64 in such a way it won’t be off-putting for those of you not decoding!
My shows will mainly consist of lesser known music with a small amount of speaking and jingles. Without spoiling too much of the show I can hint that you’ll hear some Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, English and Icelandic language music if you tune in!

The first pilot show will go out on 6070 kHz Channel292 from Germany (decent reception all over Europe) at the following times:
February Saturdays 19:00-19:30 UTC (Starting Saturday 15th)

I’m also in talks with shortwaveradio.de so there is a possibility of using 3975KHz & 6160KHz as well (increased reception in the Benelux/UK/Ireland regions!)
After the broadcast, shows will be published on Mixcloud and my reception on YouTube in case you’ve missed the show!

I will respond to all reception reports sent in and, if I get enough, I’ll try and get postcards made to send out (I’ve designed one I want to get printed!)

I would like to take this space to thank RPC Audio (Jono) for the cheap jingles and Daz from HFZone for helping me with making my mic sound good!

I really hope you all get a chance to listen in and that you get decent reception!
until next time,
tgwtr

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Christmas Carols from Antarctica on Shortwave

McMurdo Station, Antarctica. (Source: USAP.gov)

(Source: ARRL News)

A program of Christmas carols will be broadcast from Antarctica on Christmas Eve. The transmissions on 7995 kHz USB will begin on December 23 at 2300 UTC, coordinated by McMurdo Communications Operations (MacOps) — known as “The Voice of Antarctica.”

Each year, the station’s residents celebrate the holiday by singing Christmas Carols to those at remote Antarctic field camps. Participation will be from stations scattered throughout the Antarctic continent.

“The radios and antenna systems are optimized for on-continent communication, so we will be lucky to hear them in other parts of the world, but it has happened in the past,” said Nathaniel Frissell, W2NAF, who is handling QSL requests and who has participated as part of the chorus in past years while studying in Antarctica. Frissell shared some links of previous concerts, one recorded at McMurdo Station and one from the University of Twente WebSDR in the Netherlands.

Click here to read the full article at the ARRL.

UPDATE: Check out this episode of Short Wave–an NPR podcast–wher they interview the scientists involved in this tradition:

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September 1, 2019: Free Radio Skybird returns to channel292

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, “One Deck” Pete, who shares the following announcement:


DJ Frederick’s Free Radio Skybird returns to the shortwaves on Sunday September 1st 2019 via http://www.channel292.de/ on 6070 kHz at 1900 UTC (8pm UK time).

With a mixture of features and music, the hour transmission will include One Deck Pete’s “Soothing sound of shortwave”, Steve with Mini indie radio and Justin Patrick Moore from Sothismedias with another episode of the Radiophonic Laboratory.

Last month we had listeners in New Zealand, Northern Canada and Italy (QSL and soundclip here) to name but a few places. Come on, what’s better than listening to a radio broadcast with audio that has fading, co-channel interference and sounds like it had a journey via the ionosphere rather than something that’s been streamed in crisp dolby stereo? Who said shortwave radio is dead? #freeradioskybird #shortwavesnotdead #madtone

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VORW Radio International Test Broadcast Today

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor TheReportOfTheWeek who shares the following update:

This Sunday (January 28th) and next Sunday (February 4th) there will be test transmissions of VORW Radio International via radio station WINB in Pennsylvania. These tests are beamed toward North America but may be heard elsewhere, reception reports are very much appreciated to gauge effectiveness.

Sunday 2100 UTC (4 PM Eastern) – 9265 kHz – WINB 50 kW – Test to North America

Also, here is the full broadcast schedule, each show features some misc talk and commentary and some listener requested music. It can make for a fun listen!

Thursday 2000 UTC – 7780 kHz – WRMI 100 kW – Eastern North America
Thursday 2300 UTC – 9955 kHz – WRMI 100 kW – South America
Friday 0000 UTC (Thu 7 PM Eastern) – 7730 kHz – WRMI 100 kW – Western North America
Friday 0100 UTC – 9395 kHz – WRMI 100 kW – North America
Friday 0100 UTC – 9455 kHz – WRMI 100 kW – Central America
Friday 0100 UTC – 5850 kHz – WRMI 100 kW – North America
Sunday 2100 UTC – 9395 kHz – WRMI 100 kW – North America
Sunday 2100 UTC – 7780 kHz – WRMI 100 kW – North America

Questions, comments, reception reports and music requests may be sent to vorwinfo@gmail.com

Reception reports will receive a QSL!

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Nothing to hear on shortwave? Jacques disagrees…

MauritiusIsland-IndianOcean-SM

Many thanks to SWLing Post reader, Jacques Catherine, who left the following comment on our post from 2012: Is there anything to listen to on shortwave?

“I live in Mauritius Island in the Indian Ocean and I’ve been listening to Shortwave since I was a kid (I’m 58 today) on my dad’s good old Phillips wooden valve radio.

I’m sorry, but shortwave is certainly not dead. After having read all the comments above, I come to the conclusion that reception definitely depends on your location.

The Tecsun PL-660.

The Tecsun PL-660.

I have two Tecsun receivers ( Tecsun S 2000 and PL 660) hooked to a Windom antenna and an ATU. I receive dozens of stations from all over the world here as well as a lot of stuff on ssb, including – in the morning – New York MWARA (8825.0 usb), Gander (8831.0 usb) or, in the evening, Brisbane (5634.0 usb).

Broadcast stations from Japan, Taiwan, India, Iran, Australia, Singapore, China, Africa and even the US, come in here loud and clear with very little static, depending on the season and time of the day. I think I’m privileged to be located where I am !

And I bought some years back a pair of cheap small wooden amplified speakers in Hong Kong that reproduce exactly the sound of my dad’s old valve radio!”

Thank you for your comment, Jacques. You’re right: it’s all about your location…and you certainly live in a prime spot!

I’m most fortunate that I live where I do–quite far away from sources of noise that plague our urban readers/listeners (and that have plagued me in the past). My location is not ideal (from a radio/receiving standpoint) because my ground conductivity is very poor and I’m in North America where very few broadcasts are targeted these days. I do, however, have the space for a rather large horizontal delta loop antenna that serves me well across the HF bands. I might have invested $50 in the antenna wire and components five years ago.

When propagation is good, some broadcast bands are actually packed tightly with signals. Indeed, Thursday last week, I could’ve easily logged two dozen stations on the 31 meter band alone.  Here’s a screen capture from the spectrum display of my SDR:

TitanSDRPro-Spectrum-31MB

If you live in an urban area and feel that you’re missing out on the action, consider taking your receiver outdoors and away from interference. Take your receiver on hikes, camping trips or to the beach. You might be surprised by the number of stations you’ll log!

Recently, our friend London Shortwave has been posting an amazing array of broadcast recordings he’s made in a park in the middle of London, England. He’s the guru of mitigating urban interference.

When I have time to curate the recordings, I hope to do a 2016 update of “Is there anything to listen to on shortwave?“–it’s been on my to-do list for a while now.

Jacques, thanks again for your comment and reminding us to keep listening!

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Nothing on shortwave? I still disagree.

SpectrumDisplay-31Meters-WinRadioExcalibur

One of the most popular posts on the SWLing Post is one published nearly two years ago: “Is there anything to listen to on shortwave?

In that article, I posted recordings made on the 31 meter band of eight different broadcasters, all of which I found within a 250 kHz chunk of bandwidth on a Friday afternoon.

On February 8th (this past Saturday), I recorded a 160 kHz chunk of spectrum on the 31 meter band with my WinRadio Excalibur, starting around 1:00 UTC and lasting for about 9 hours.  I made this spectrum recording in attempt to capture the Voice of Korea on one of their three scheduled frequencies.

While VOK wasn’t audible enough to make a good recording, I did log the following stations all within this thin slice of radio spectrum (click on links for recordings):

I’m guessing that I only logged 50% of what I heard as this list was put together from a quick scan through the recording. In fact, I’m systematically making recordings of each of these broadcasts, from the spectrum file, and adding them to the Shortwave Radio Audio Archive. I may actually discover more stations in the process.

My point is, if you think there’s nothing to listen to on shortwave, you’re simply not listening!

Now back to my radio…

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