Category Archives: Schedules

The Worldwide Listening Guide: A deep dive into online and over-the-air listening

I recently received a review copy of the 9th Edition of the Worldwide Listening Guide by John Figliozzi:

While WRTH is my favorite guide for radio frequencies and schedules, Figliozzi’s Worldwide Listening Guide (WWLG) is my go-to for programming and content, not only helpful on the shortwaves, but especially handy when tracking online content.

The WWLG is a unique guide–there’s nothing quite like it on the market. I look forward to each edition because it truly takes a deep dive into the world of broadcasting, technology, and programming.

“Deep dive” almost feels like an understatement. I received the latest edition only a few days before Christmas travels, so packed it in my luggage and read it over the course of a week. Being the editor of the SWLing Post, I’m in the middle of a constant stream of news items and tips about the world of broadcasting and communications technology. When I read the WWLG, however, I discover so much information about the broadcasting industry as a whole, the health of various platforms, particular media companies, and even the history and technology behind content delivery systems.

Case in point: I always assumed SiriusXM satellite radio was delivered by a network of geostationary satellites. Turns out, they use a hybrid system of both “roving” satellites that orbit in a figure 8 pattern and geostationary satellites in the Clarke Belt. The WWLG is chock-full of details like this.

Each media delivery platform–AM, Shortwave, FM, Satellite Radio, Internet (WiFi Radio), and Podcasting–has a dedicated section in the book where Figliozzi explores each in detail. He also includes a “State of the Radio Platforms” chapter where he examines the health and potential direction of each.

SWLing Post contributor, Mark Fahey, recently summed up his love of the WWLG in the following comment: 

[I]t’s the best guide to digital streaming media I have ever found. An indispensable guide to the world’s public broadcasters and others broadcasters who appeal to us raised on decades of shortwave.

As shortwave transmitters close, don’t make the mistake of thinking your favourite broadcasters disappear – they in most cases continue and the Worldwide Listening Guide will guide you to them as live and on-demand programs.

I use the guide as a directory for online listening, but of course RF transmission broadcasts are comprehensively covered as well.

I agree 100%.

Like Mark and many SWLs, I’m something of a “Content DXer:” I love chasing obscure programming––news, documentaries, music, and variety shows, anything the broadcasting world has to offer.  For this, I often turn to Wi-Fi radio.  Wi-Fi radio offers the discerning listener the ability to track down fascinating regional content from every corner of the globe––content never actually intended for an international audience.

Digging into local content via a WiFi radio isn’t nearly as challenging or fun (for me, at least) as scanning the shortwave bands in search of elusive weak signal DX or a pop-up pirate radio station. Though my WiFi radio offers an easy and reliable way to “tune” to online content–both station streams and podcasts–the actual content discovery part is quite difficult.

Truth is, there’s so much content out there–tens of thousands of stations and shows–it’s hard to know where to start!

This is where the WWLG comes in: Figliozzi exhaustively curates thousands of programs, indexing their airing times, stations, days of broadcast, program types, frequencies, and web addresses. Additionally, he sorts the programs by genre:  arts, culture, history, music, sports, and more. And Figliozzi also includes a well-thought-out directory of at least forty genres. In my shack and office, the WWLG has been an invaluable tool for content discovery.

There’s a surprising amount of information packed into this slim, spiral-bound edition of the Worldwide Listening Guide…enough to keep even a seasoned content DXer happy for years.

The 9th edition of Worldwide Listening Guide can be purchased here:

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“Direkt aus Tamsui“ 2019 broadcast schedule

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, G. Koopal, who shares the following analog and DRM broadcast schedule for “Direkt aus Tamsui“ (“Direct from Tamsui”).

Aktion “Direkt aus Tamsui“ 2019

Testsendungen am 16. August (Freitag)

ANALOG

Frequenz 11990 kHz (325): 17:00-17:05 UTC
Frequenz 9540 kHz(315):  18:00-18:05 UTC

DRM

Frequenz 11990 kHz:  17:15-17:20 UTC
Frequenz 9540 kHz:   18:15-18:20 UTC

Offizielle Sendetermine:

11990 kHz  1700-1800 UTC
9540 kHz   1800-1900 UTC

30. August (Freitag) / analog
31. August (Samstag) / analog
01. September (Sonntag) / DRM
06. September (Freitag) / analog
07. September (Samstag) / analog
08. September (Sonntag) / analog
13. September (Freitag) / analog (Mondfest)
14. September (Samstag) / analog
15. September (Sonntag) / DRM
20. September (Freitag) / analog
21. September (Samstag) / analog
22. September (Sonntag) / analog

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WRTH A19 season updates

(Source: WRTH)

The latest version of the A19 International and C&OTB broadcaster schedules pdf has been uploaded to the WRTH website.

This download is available free of charge and includes the transmission schedules from 180+ International and Clandestine/Target broadcasters, arranged by country.

For maximum usability, these schedules are in the same format and use the same names/sites and codes as the printed World Radio TV Handbook.

If you have already downloaded the A19 file previously, I would recommend replacing it with the new version as this has a significant number of changes and updates (shown in blue throughout the file) over the original.

There are a number of free schedule compilations available on the web, some (or many) of which use at least part (or some) of our data – which is flattering. What makes ours different is that when used together with the printed WRTH, our schedules files and in-season updates, you get:

  • Full contact details of all the broadcasters mentioned, plus all those domestic stations from every nation;
  • Numbers and powers of transmitters, both Shortwave and Medium/Longwave;
  • Reference material;
  • Equipment reviews;
  • Articles about broadcasters, antennas, etc.

All of this goes into making WRTH usable and current, all year long.

Click here for WRTH online.

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WRTH A19 Bargraph Frequency Guide

(Source: WRTH via John Hoad)

WRTH A19 Bargraph Frequency Guide

Now Available – Buy your CD or Download today!

We are delighted to announce the availability of the new WRTH Bargraph Frequency Guide for the A19 season. The CD contains the complete, and monitored, A19 international broadcasts on LW, MW and SW, and fully updated domestic shortwave, displayed as a pdf colour bargraph.
There are also other pdf and xls files to help you get the most out of the Bargraph. All these files are also available on a downloadable Zip file.

If you have not yet got your copy of WRTH 2019 then why not buy one now. Readers in the USA can also buy from Amazon.com or Universal Radio Inc.

The CD and Download are only available from the WRTH site. Visit our website to find out more and to order a copy.

I hope you enjoy using this new Frequency Guide.

Nicholas Hardyman

Publisher

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Alan Roe’s updated A19 season guide to music on shortwave

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Alan Roe, who notes:

I attach an updated version (version 2) of my “Music Programmes on Shortwave” PDF list for the current A-19 broadcast season for you to consider adding to your SWLing Post pages. I hope that you find it of interest. As always, I appreciate any updates or corrections.

Alan, thanks so much for keeping this brilliant guide updated each broadcast season and for sharing it here with the Post community! I always keep a printed version of your guide at my listening post!

Click here to download a PDF copy of Alan Roe’s Music on Shortwave A-19.

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Alex updates frequency charts and upgrades format

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Alex, who notes updates to his excellent frequency charts. Alex writes:

My charts are updated again. This time I have changed format and made the charts less time consuming to compile and – I think – more user friendly too.

The result is they are updated for the summer schedule much earlier – there are still 6 months of summer to go for them to be useful!

For each hour, the listener is given a running order of about 30 stations that are most worthwhile to try. Doing it this way means you can easily compare the reception quality of the different frequencies for the same station and also get an idea of each broadcaster’s strategy for reaching listeners.

For the summer, I have put the top station as number 51, down to about 80. Many radios have enough storage to allow you to set a page for each hour and then up to 100 presets for each page. This means you can check your favourite stations in a couple of minutes. There is less detail, but today time is so precious, the ease of use seemed to me to be the priority for the charts. (I have numbered 1 to 30 for the winter charts)

Thank you for once again updating and sharing your handy broadcast charts, Alex!

Click here to download Alex’s broadcast charts via his website, ShortwaveTimes.com.

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What are Shortwave and HF broadcast seasons?

After posting recent shortwave broadcast schedules and updates for the A19 season, SWLing Post reader Tom Cook asked, What is A19?”

Excellent question, Tom! And, frankly, one I’ve never answered here on the SWLing Post even though it’s so fundamental to understand HF broadcast scheduling.

Shortwave broadcast schedules are coordinated for two seasons:

  • a summer season which starts on the last Sunday in March and ends on the last Sunday in October; and
  • a winter season which starts on the last Sunday in October and ends on the last Sunday in March.

The summer season is often referred to as the “A” season, and winter the “B” season. This is often abbreviated, so “A19” equates to the 2019 “A” or summer season.

For newcomers to shortwave listening, the confusing bit is that three month period between January and March in any given year–the end of the “B” season which started the previous year. For example, in February 2019 you would still be in the B18 broadcast season even though you’re already in the year 2019.

At time of posting (May 4, 2019), we are in the A19 HF broadcasting season.

Thanks for asking your question, Tom! I hope this explanation helps.

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