Tag Archives: WRTH

WRTH 2022: Two very important announcements…

If you’ve been reading the SWLing Post for long, you’ll know that I’m a huge fan of the annual World Radio TV Handbook (WRTH). If you’re a fan of WRTH as well, I’ve got some good news and some…well…less than good news.

Good News: WRTH 2022 is Shipping!

The new 2022 edition of the WRTH has been printed and is shipping.

Purchase your copy of WRTH 2022 directly from WRTH’s publishers, or from a distributor like Universal Radio (US) , Amazon.com (US),  or the Book Depository (international).

Bad News: WRTH 2022 will be the final edition by WRTH Publications

WRTH’s publisher, Nicholas Hardyman, shared the following announcement today:

Having produced this book for the past 24 years we are very sorry to announce that WRTH 2022 will be the final edition of World Radio TV Handbook produced and published by WRTH Publications. This was a hard decision to make and one we only made after a lot of discussion. We know that many people rely on WRTH and greatly enjoy getting the new edition every year. We realise that this news will be disappointing for many people.

We want to thank you all for your loyal support over the years.

I know this must have been a very difficult decision for the WRTH team. While it is disappointing news, I wish everyone at WRTH the very best. I’ve gotten to know this team, especially Nicholas, over the years and it’s been an honor to work with them and even write a few of their reviews.

What now?

I believe WRTH will maintain an online presence for years to come. I would encourage you to keep their website bookmarked. Of course, we’ll announce any changes or updates to the WRTH site.

My advice? Don’t hesitate to buy the 2022 Edition!

Seriously. I can’t tell you how many readers over the years have told me they regretted not purchasing the final edition of Passport to Worldband Radio when it was new. Many didn’t realize that particular year would be the final edition and missed the opportunity.

In this case, we now know the 2022 edition of the WRTH will be the last. We have to assume the company printed roughly the same amount of books that they did last year since the decision was made after the book had gone to print.

In other words, the supply will be similar to last year, but I predict demand will be much higher with readers knowing in advance that this is the final edition.

My advice would be that if you want the 2022 edition, I would bite the bullet now instead of waiting.

Purchase your copy of WRTH 2022 directly from WRTH’s publishers, or from a distributor like Universal Radio (US) , Amazon.com (US),  or the Book Depository (international).

Again, here’s wishing everyone at WRTH Publishing the very best! Thank you for so many years of bringing our amazing international radio world into print.

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WRTH A21 season broadcasting schedule updates available as free download

Many thanks to Sean Gilbert, with the World Radio TV Handbook, who shares the following announcement:

WRTH is pleased to announce that the A21 (Summer) season broadcasting schedules for International and Clandestine/Target broadcasters are now available for download, free of charge.

This file is in PDF format so you will need software capable of reading the Adobe PDF format (such as the free Adobe Acrobat reader, amongst others).

Not only do you get the full schedules, extras included with the file are:
Broadcasts in Selected Languages (English. French, German, Portuguese, and Spanish); International DRM broadcasts (yes, there are still some around); International Broadcasting Frequency list; International Transmitter Sites, with lat/long; WRTH Target Areas and religious stations cross-reference table (You can find out which country each station is based in and where to find their schedule as that is not always as obvious as it may seem).

Please visit www.wrth.com and follow the links to the download page.

We hope you find this a useful file, both as a stand-alone product and as an accompaniment to the printed WRTH volume.

Feel free to pass this information on to all your radio friends and your social media groups, etc.

73 and happy listening from the WRTH Editorial Staff.

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WRTH 2021: A look inside the 75th Anniversary Edition!

Last week, I received a long-awaited Christmas gift: the 2021 World Radio TV Handbook. Normally, I’d receive this annual guide in the December time frame, but because of delays in international postal services due to the Covid-19 pandemic, I took delivery a few weeks late.  

I always look forward to receiving this excellent staple radio reference guide–and this is their 75th edition! As I say each year, the WRTH has never disappointed, so my expectations are always quite high.

Once again, the WRTH lived up to my expectations.

WRTH’s team of noted DXers from around the world curate frequencies and broadcaster information by region; while I’m not sure how they orchestrate all of this, the end result is truly a symphony of radio information. In addition to broadcaster listings, WRTH’s radio reviews, feature articles, and annual HF report make for excellent reading.

But the WRTH isn’t just a frequency guide: the publication always devotes the first sixty or so pages to articles relating to various aspects of the radio hobby. Following, I offer a quick overview of these.

The first article always features a WRTH contributor:  this year, they feature Stig Hartvig Nielson. His path to becoming a WRTH contributor began in his childhood when he said he was “tall enough to reach the radio tuning knob and tune away from dull Radio Denmark.”  His love of radio lead him down the path of becoming a broadcaster. Many of us know him via his station, Radio208.

WRTH Reviews

The second set of articles is always my favorite: WRTH receiver reviews.

This year, WRTH begins with an in-depth review of the AOR AR5700D wideband communications receiver–a radio I’d likely never touch in real-life, so it’s wonderful to take such a deep dive.  Next up is a review of the Bonito NTi MegaDipol MD300DX antenna which gets high marks for high gain, low noise, and good dynamic range. The following in-depth review is of the benchmark Icom IC-7610 general coverage transceiver. This was the first time I’ve read a review of this SDR transceiver with radio listeners in mind. WRTH then review the Bonito NTi CCMC30 common mode noise filter–a tool that can help radio enthusiasts mitigate RFI.

A review of the SDRplay RSPdx follows and the review speaks to the performance improvements included with the new HDR mode. The next review is actually one I authored of the Tecsun PL-990 portable radio–it’s always an honor to be in the pages of the WRTH!

The final review is of the Valent F(x) KiwiSDR; a little web-connected SDR receiver that has certainly transformed the nature and accessibility of remote listening.

WRTH Features

The first feature article, written by none other than Dave Porter, focuses on the development of HF broadcast transmitters. This article adds to the one he authored last year which focused on broadcast antennas. Dave is amazing because he has such an extensive history in the world of HF broadcasting and his experience and expertise are obvious in all of his writing. This is a must-read for those who want to know more about the “business side” of an international broadcast signal!

Manfred Rippich’s feature, Radio in Bhutan, explores the story of broadcasting in one of the most mountainous countries in the world where communities–including the capitol–are not easily accessible. Radio broadcasting plays an important role in this amazing country.

The following feature, Coastwatchers & the AWA Teleradio 3BZ written by Dr Martin Hadlow, takes a look at the importance of portable radios in the Pacific War. An absolutely fascinating piece for those of us who love radio history.

The final feature was written by Alan Pennington and explores the dynamic Scandinavian Weekend Radio.  It’s hard to believe SWR has celebrated 20 years on the air as of 2020. Pennington’s article explores the grassroots energy of this unique broadcaster!

The final article–a tradition–is the WRTH  HF propagation report/forecast by Ulf-Peter Hoppe. Always an informative read especially as we continue to work our way out of a long-term solar slump.

The 75th is another fantastic edition of the World Radio TV Handbook. As I say every year, I’ve never been disappointed with WRTH. Their publishing standards are such that the quality of their reviews, their writing, and (most importantly) their broadcast listings are simply unparalleled.

For DXers who collect QSL cards, you’ll find that broadcaster contact information in WRTH is often more up-to-date than a broadcaster’s own website. When readers contact me asking for QSL information from an obscure broadcaster, the first place I search is the current WRTH. Remember: their information is based on volunteer contributors who specialize in specific regions of the world–the most knowledgeable regional DXers keep this publication accurate.

Purchase your copy of WRTH 2020 directly from WRTH’s publishers, or from a distributor like Universal Radio (US) , Amazon.com (US),  or the Book Depository (international).

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WRTH A20 Bargraph Frequency Guide available for purchase and download

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Harald Kuhl, who writes:

The A20 WRTH Bargraph Frequency Guide is available now.

http://www.wrth.com/_shop/?product=wrth-a20-bargraph-download

I think it’s very helpful for the shortwave listener.

Kind regards, stay safe and have a nice weekend.

Many thanks, Harald, I agree: the WRTH Bargraph is an excellent, intuitive reference for checking broadcast schedules.

Click here to purchase (£9.99) and download the WRTH A20 Bargraph PDFs. 

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WRTH 2020: A look inside

I received my review copy of the 2020 World Radio and TV Handbook (WRTH) shortly after returning from holiday travels last week. I always look forward to receiving this excellent staple radio reference guide–and this is their 74th edition! The WRTH has never disappointed, so my expectations are always quite high.

Once again, the WRTH lived up to my expectations.

WRTH’s team of noted DXers from around the world curate frequencies and broadcaster information by region; while I’m not sure how they orchestrate all of this, the end result is truly a symphony of radio information. In addition to broadcaster listings, WRTH’s radio reviews, feature articles, and annual HF report make for excellent reading.

But the WRTH isn’t just a frequency guide: the publication always devotes the first sixty or so pages to articles relating to various aspects of the radio hobby. Following, I offer a quick overview of these.

The first article always features a WRTH contributor:  this year, they feature Luis Cavalho who is their contributor for Portugal, the Azores and Madeira. His path to becoming a WRTH contributor began in his childhood snagging mediumwave DX with an array of portable radios. His love of radio lead him to the world of shortwave radio, WRTH and eventually his own radio website to serve Portuguese listeners.

WRTH Reviews

The second set of articles is always my favorite: WRTH receiver reviews.

This year, WRTH begins with an in-depth review of the excellent ELAD FDM-DUOr tabletop SDR receiver.  Next they build on their 2019 review of the SDRplay RSPduo by exploring its unique diversity reception capabilities. They also review the AirSpy HF+ Discovery and were so impressed they awarded it the 2020 Best Value SDR.

This year, WRTH also reviewed two portable radios by Pure: the Pure Elan E3 DAB, DAB+, FM receiver and the Pure Elan IR5 WifI radio.

The final two reviews are of affordable products that offer incredible value for the radio listener: the venerable Tecsun PL-310ET ultralight radio and the Tecsun AN-200 MW Loop Antenna. I enjoyed reading a fresh review of each of these products as I’ve personally used both for nearly a decade.

WRTH Features

The first feature article, written by none other than Dave Porter, focuses on the development of HF broadcast antennas. His article serves as an excellent primer on the topic, covering Rhombic Antennas, Corner Quadrant Antennas, Log-Periodic Arrays and ALLISS /Rigid Curtain Arrays. A must-read for those who want to know more about the “business side” of a broadcast signal!

Hans Johnson’s feature, Sea Breeze and Wind from Japan, explores the story behind the broadcasts to Japanese citizens abducted by North Korea. Truly, an inspiring story of a determined and mission-dedicated broadcasters.

The following feature article was written by WRTH contributor and chief editor of the New Zealand DX Times, Stu Forsyth, who outlines the history of broadcasting from New Caledonia in the Pacific.

The next feature article focuses on the “finer points” of mediumwave propagation. I thought this was an informative and and timely article as so many shortwave DXers (including yours truly) spend time on the mediumwave bands especially during winter and times of rough HF propagation. A must-read!

Ashraf Chaaban, president of the Association des Radio Amateurs Tunisiens, takes WRTH readers with him on a visit to the Sidi Manson Transmitter Site in Tunisia in the final feature article. Having an affinity for broadcast sites, I sincerely enjoyed the focus on Sidi Manson which fell silent on shortwave in 2014.

Next, WRTH spotlight the annual Digital Update which summarizes the dynamic state of digital broadcasting. I’ve found this feature to be incredibly informative as we see how digital broadcasting is penetrating both domestic and international services.

The final article–a tradition–is the WRTH  HF propagation report/forecast by Ulf-Peter Hoppe. Always an informative read especially as we work our way out of a log-term solar slump.

The 74th is another fantastic edition of the World Radio TV Handbook. As I say every year, I’ve never been disappointed with WRTH. Their publishing standards are such that the quality of their reviews, their writing, and (most importantly) their broadcast listings are simply unparalleled.

At the heart of any WRTH is an uncompromising and unparalleled amount of information regarding regional and international broadcasting.

For DXers who collect QSL cards, you’ll find that broadcaster contact information in WRTH is often more up-to-date than a broadcaster’s own website. When readers contact me asking for QSL information from an obscure broadcaster, the first place I search is the current WRTH. Remember: their information is based on volunteer contributors who specialize in specific regions of the world–the most knowledgeable regional DXers keep this publication accurate.

Purchase your copy of WRTH 2020 directly from WRTH’s publishers, or from a distributor like Universal Radio (US) , Amazon.com (US),  or the Book Depository (international).

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WRTH A19 season updates

(Source: WRTH)

The latest version of the A19 International and C&OTB broadcaster schedules pdf has been uploaded to the WRTH website.

This download is available free of charge and includes the transmission schedules from 180+ International and Clandestine/Target broadcasters, arranged by country.

For maximum usability, these schedules are in the same format and use the same names/sites and codes as the printed World Radio TV Handbook.

If you have already downloaded the A19 file previously, I would recommend replacing it with the new version as this has a significant number of changes and updates (shown in blue throughout the file) over the original.

There are a number of free schedule compilations available on the web, some (or many) of which use at least part (or some) of our data – which is flattering. What makes ours different is that when used together with the printed WRTH, our schedules files and in-season updates, you get:

  • Full contact details of all the broadcasters mentioned, plus all those domestic stations from every nation;
  • Numbers and powers of transmitters, both Shortwave and Medium/Longwave;
  • Reference material;
  • Equipment reviews;
  • Articles about broadcasters, antennas, etc.

All of this goes into making WRTH usable and current, all year long.

Click here for WRTH online.

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WRTH A19 Bargraph Frequency Guide

(Source: WRTH via John Hoad)

WRTH A19 Bargraph Frequency Guide

Now Available – Buy your CD or Download today!

We are delighted to announce the availability of the new WRTH Bargraph Frequency Guide for the A19 season. The CD contains the complete, and monitored, A19 international broadcasts on LW, MW and SW, and fully updated domestic shortwave, displayed as a pdf colour bargraph.
There are also other pdf and xls files to help you get the most out of the Bargraph. All these files are also available on a downloadable Zip file.

If you have not yet got your copy of WRTH 2019 then why not buy one now. Readers in the USA can also buy from Amazon.com or Universal Radio Inc.

The CD and Download are only available from the WRTH site. Visit our website to find out more and to order a copy.

I hope you enjoy using this new Frequency Guide.

Nicholas Hardyman

Publisher

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