China Radio International: China’s first sound trademark

CRI-China-Radio-International(Source: China Radio International via David Iurescia, LW4DAF)

A state-owned radio station’s signature tune is about to be approved as China’s first sound trademark.

The State Administration for Industry and Commerce (SAIC) said on Sunday that it has reviewed the application from China Radio International and plans to approve it.

A sound trademark is a sound that is used to perform the trademark function of uniquely identifying the commercial origin of products or services. Famous examples include the Nokia tune and the “I’m lovin’ it” jingle of McDonald’s.

China’s top legislature revised the Trademark Law to allow sound to be registered as a trademark in 2013.

The SAIC had received 450 applications for sound trademarks by the end of January since starting to accept such applications in May 2014.

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5 thoughts on “China Radio International: China’s first sound trademark

  1. Keith Perron

    It will be rather amusing to see if they will be able to enforce something like this.

    It’s the first few bars of the national anthem. Now while they will be able to enforce this in China. Thats where this “so called copyright” law ends.

    Reply
  2. Max

    First of all, China is communist pretty much in name only. Second of all, I find it funny that what they’re copyrighting is essentially the first few bars of their national anthem.

    And as for copyright and IP violations, the vast majority of that is from private enterprises there, not from any state run entities.

    Reply
  3. Edward

    China is a communist state. Are they finally acknowledging the existence of the concept of Copyright? I wish they would respect ours.

    Reply
  4. Jello

    It’s funny seeing a Chinese state broadcaster applying for copyright,
    and yet it is the biggest offender when it comes to respecting others
    IP copyright.

    And of course, we westerners create rules to ensure fairness, but the
    other side then uses these rules as a hold against us.

    You can guess the rest..

    Reply

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