White House petition to maintain NIST funding of WWV time stations

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Tom Kelly, who shares the following:

I recently read your article concerning the proposed shutdown of the NIST stations WWV/WWVH.

To that end, I have gone ahead and created a Whitehouse petition to see if this decision can be reversed:

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/maintain-funding-nist-stations-wwv-wwvh

Would there be any way you could perhaps post the link to this so that fellow members of the SWLing Post could sign it? I believe the more folks we have sign the better chance we have of maintaining the radio stations we have all come to rely upon.

Thanks, Tom, for launching this petition–I had planned to do so this morning and am thankful you beat me to it.

SWLing Post readers: please take a moment to sign this petition. It requires only a few seconds to complete and you need only to submit your name and email address. This is an official petition instrument of the White House and, as such, can actually lead to a response and potential review. Please spread the word throughout your radio communities!

Click here to sign.

Please spread the word!

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20 thoughts on “White House petition to maintain NIST funding of WWV time stations

  1. Pingback: Marketplace: “Time may be up for timekeeping radio stations” | The SWLing Post

  2. JOHN DOSSEY

    Time, standard frequency, and propagation information are vital to build maintain America’s technology leadership.

    Reply
  3. Margo Kovolesky

    Really the atomic clock is Ft Collins is not used just by radio station but many different companies for accruate time keeping – I am contacting my repas also –

    Reply
  4. Caryn Sobel

    Signed, and I’ll contact my representative. I’m tired of “well, we have the Internet” as the excuse for every form of cost-cutting.

    Reply
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  6. Ronnie

    We must try to get support to keep these time signals and frequency standard stations operational. I use them to verify the accurate time and also to check propagation. They are vital and we need them to continue. They are not enormously power-hungry and I can’t see much saving to shut them down. They keep sending even when the internet is down (which happens quite a lot!). Lets all sign the petition and try to save this essential resource.

    Reply
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  8. /guy

    i’m #6143. but subtract that number from 100k and then consider there’s about 3 weeks left and it’s depressing. i sure don’t want to buy a dozen clocks again. /guy (73 de kg5vt | wqpz784)

    Reply
    1. Thomas Post author

      Indeed. And the 100K is just to get a formal reply—no promise of action. I think the most important thing to do is contact our representatives and voice our opinions.

      Reply
  9. Pingback: Lennart’s WWVH 5 MHz QSL and a quick NIST update | The SWLing Post

  10. Tom

    Thanks to everyone that has signed the petition, please pass the word to anyone and everyone, it only takes a moment to sign, and we need as many people as possible.

    Appreciate your help with this gents!

    Reply
  11. Mario

    I distinctly remember JC Whitney catalogs having a converter for car radios that would receive WWV but that was over a half-century ago. Wonder if that was the one in Jim’s father’s car. As an SWL back then I could not figure out why someone would want one of those time station converters for their car; now I know.

    And thanks Tom for getting the petition together, I signed. Fingers and toes are crossed to get enough signatures.

    Reply
    1. JasonR

      Thousands if not millions of hams use these frequencies as well. So long as the ARRL puts the word out, it’ll get enough signatures from US constituents. Now, just having 100K signatures might not keep the funding, but at least it shows there is a broad interest in the service.

      Reply
  12. Jim Trame

    Done. I first learned of WWV back in the early sixties when my dad ran sports car rallies. He had a shortwave converter tuned to 10 Mhz in his Karman Ghia. Timing is everything in these rallies.

    I sent for the QSL card when I got my Lafayette receiver in 1966. Still have it, and WWVH.

    Jim- W4FJT

    Reply

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