Radio Belarus to shut down shortwave, mediumwave and longwave?

SX-99-Dial-Nar

Many thanks to several SWLing Post readers who have shared this news from the Radio Belarus website.

Since I rely on a machine translation of the news page via Google Translate, I’m not totally clear about the details, but it appears Radio Belarus is shutting down their longwave, mediumwave and shortwave broadcasts on April 1, 2016.

Any SWLing Post readers out there who can read and translate the details on this page? If so, please comment and I’ll post the translation here!  Thanks!

UPDATE: SWLing Post contributor, Igor, comments with the following translation which was also confirmed by Ed:

Due to the fact that National Government Broadcasting Company of Belarus Republic refused services of the Belarus Radio and TV Transmitting Center, since April, 01 transmission of radio programs of “1 National Channel of Belarus Radio” and “Radiostation Belarus” on LW, MW and SW bands will stop:

– by transmitting center in Kolodishci:
– “1 National Channel of Belarus Radio” on 7255 KHz, 250 KW
– “Radiostation Belarus” on 11930 KHz, 250 KW
– “Radiostation Belarus” on 11730 KHz, 150 KW
– “1 National Channel of Belarus Radio” on 6080 KHz, 150 KW
– by Osipovich transmitting center in Sosnovy:
– “1 National Channel of Belarus Radio” on 279 KHz, 500 KW
– “Radiostation Belarus” on 1170 KHz, 800 KW

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39 thoughts on “Radio Belarus to shut down shortwave, mediumwave and longwave?

  1. Ernie Hollingsworth

    How up-to-date is this information on Radio Belarus? They have been broadcasting on 3985 kHZ today (2016-08-21 22:00-22:50 UTC).

    Reply
  2. Pingback: John’s QSL package from Radio Belarus | The SWLing Post

  3. Just telling the truth.

    Thankfully another waste of space has freed up some spectrum.
    Seriously, who would want to listen to this rubbish ?

    Almost as bad as the so called Mighty KBC, which just consisted of
    weirdos with stupid Atlantic sounding accents playing old records
    and thinking how great it all is.

    Get real dudes 😉

    Reply
    1. Paul Walker

      There are those of us who enjoyed what KBC did. Professionals who decided to step out of Norm of SW and provide something a little different then the politics or religion that overflows the SW dials.

      I spend my own money from time to time to buy air time on WBCQ, WRMI, Channel 292 and others without ever seeking sponsors or donations and jut play 2 hours of rock and roll music, just because!

      But I guess you’d rather here all the wacko preachers and political talkers then some music and other enjoyable content on SW.

      Reply
      1. Just telling the truth.

        >But I guess you’d rather here all the wacko preachers >and political talkers

        Nope. I just want some useful content, not vacuous waffle about nothing of any real use to me at all.

        As Mr Jagger once sang –

        And that man comes on the radio
        And he’s tellin’ me more and more
        About some useless information
        Supposed to fire my imagination

        Oh so true !

        Reply
        1. Ed McCorry (KI4QDE)

          You know what’s good about SW radio? If you don’t like what your hearing all you have to do is turn that tuning knob. It’s that easy. I for one have enjoyed KBC for the last 3 years. To each his own.

          Reply
    2. Concerned

      Seriously, I thought KBC had a pretty good show and they played music I grew up with. On a Saturday night I’d listen to them while proof reading my logs so Mr. Perfect wouldn’t be complaining I messed up a frequency number. Speaking of Belarus, they had some pretty good programming when I could pick them up. Any station is a loss to the hobby when they leave the air in my book. Getting to the point in the US that we don’t have squat to listen to except for religion.

      Reply
  4. LocalRadioListener

    Has RCI really returned? Or is it someone who is taking their content and re-broadcasting it? Or a pirate? Can anyone provide a frequency and schedule? Or a recording?

    Reply
    1. Sean G4UCJ

      This is what RCI is registered for (via R700/SW Services):
      1400-1430 English Sat 7310kHz via Kall, Germany
      1430-1530 French Sat 6005kHz via Kall, Germany

      Won’t know until tomorrow if this is RCI proper, or a pale imitation. The fact it is in English and French is encouraging.

      Reply
      1. LocalRadioListener

        Yes – very much hoping it is at least something official. Their usual shows “The Link” (English) and “Tam-Tam” (French) usually run longer than 30:00, so perhaps they have prepared special editions? Is there anyone here who can record these broadcasts?

        Reply
  5. Sean G4UCJ

    I’ve just been poking around on their website and, unless they are keeping it rather quiet and in an obscure place, there is no mention of them shutting down or stopping broadcasts. They have even listed the A16: FREQUENCIES OF BROADCASTING
    From 27.03.2016 on 10.30.2016:
    In the HF range:
    from 14:00 to 02:00 local time (11:00 – 23:00 GMT) at a frequency of 11 730 kHz ,
    with 20:05 to 02:00 local time (17:05 – 23 : 00 GMT) at a frequency of 11 930 kHz .

    FM-transmitters and frequencies:
    Brest – 96.4 MHz
    Grodno – 96.9 MHz
    Svisloch – 100.8 MHz
    geranium – 99.9 MHz
    Braslav – 106.6 MHz
    Myadel – 102.0 MHz

    The only way to tell what is going on is to monitor their output. Of course, with things like this, they are apt to change at the drop of a hat. We’ve lost enough stations recently without this one joining them. We saved RAE, by listener pressure and others have tried to go off but have managed a last minute reprieve. If you live in Europe, Radio Canada International has resurfaced on SW – via the R700/SW Services 1kW transmitter in Kall, Germany. Odd place to return, but I’ll take it 🙂

    Reply
      1. Sean G4UCJ

        The A16 as shown above was taken from the Radio Belarus website. I’m aware of the problems with schedules that are listed and reserved in the preliminary HFCC. The only way to be 100% sure is to monitor the specified frequencies and see if anything is being broadcast. It is possible that they may choose to relay via alternative 3rd party site(s), if that is financially viable. I, for one, am sad to see the demise of any station, SW ones in particular.

        Reply
  6. Keith Perron

    I’m just surprised they went on so long. The big problem with all these stations in Eastern Europe was the only targeted areas that have the smallest SW audiences.

    They should have targeted regions where SW is still popular. Parts of Africa, Parts of Latin America, Southeast Asia, East Asia.

    Reply
  7. Tudor Vedeanu

    Belarus leaving 279 kHz means I’ll be able to hear Turkmenistan on the same frequency. I only received them for short periods of time around midnight (local time) when Belarus was off the air. It’s going to be interesting.

    Reply
  8. Pingback: Recording the final broadcast of Radio Belarus? | The SWLing Post

  9. Dean Denton

    I guess it is good in a way, because 11730am has very irritating spurs which dominate other stations, but also a sad loss…

    Reply
  10. John

    It’s always sad when another country leaves the airwaves. Truth be told though, I have never successfully picked up Radio Belarus in North America, and even listening on a WebSDR proved difficult due to their faulty transmitters and modulation issues.

    Still, in 2015 I managed to get a QSL Card for them, and I figure I’ll give it one last shot.

    Reply
  11. Orton

    Who cares what they do? It’s a little country that didn’t even exist as a separate entity until the breakup of the USSR. What do they broadcast that’s of any interest to anyone?

    Reply
        1. David

          There would appear to be sufficient for the station to recently meet with Radio 700 from Germany to discuss further cooperation. The main issue it would seem that the station closed down frequencies was economic. To say they had an audience of nil as per your other post is ridiculous, either provide proof or don’t say it. Do you not believe that smaller countries should also have their voice heard? There are Belarusian diasporas in Russia, Ukraine, Poland, the Baltic states, Central Asia and the TransCaucasus nations as well as the USA, Canada, the UK,. These are their target markets, not places like Africa, South America, South East and East Asia. This is not what SWL or DXing is about.

          Reply
    1. Keith Perron

      Orton. Exactly. This is the problem with all the stations that came after 1991 and stations that were part of the Eastern bloc. Many were chugging along for years. What you said says it all. I suspect they had an audience of nil. That was also part of the decision.

      Reply
      1. Ian

        I think I listened about 4 times following my initial (and only) reception report. But definitely didn’t listen in the 3 years prior to the SW closure. Programming & presentation seamed uninspiring. I think the Music Box program occupied at least 40% of the programming, or so it seamed.

        Reply
  12. Paul walker

    Sad but not surprising. Thomas, I’ve gone and posted this in a few places on Facebook and by email to get the word out and maybe some folks can log them before they disappear

    Reply
  13. Dan Robinson

    That is indeed what it says. Another country bites the dust on shortwave. Perhaps some of us should record the final hours of Belarus’ programming on 11.730?

    Reply
  14. Ed

    You got it!

    In connection with the refusal of the National State TV and Radio of the Republic of Belarus RUE “Concern RRT” services and the lack of other customers with 01.04.2016g. stops air broadcasting of sound programs “First National Channel of the Belarusian Radio” and “Radio Belarus” in the range of low, medium and high frequencies:

    – Transmitting radio shop in the village Kolodishchi:

    · “First National Channel of the Belarusian Radio” transmitter power of 250 kW at a frequency of 7.255 MHz;

    · “Radio Belarus” transmitter power of 250 kW at a frequency of 11.930 MHz;

    · “Radio Belarus” transmitter power of 150 kW at a frequency of 11.730 MHz;

    · “First National Channel of the Belarusian Radio” transmitter power of 150 kW at a frequency of 6,080 MHz;

    – Osipovichiskim transmitting radio shop (in the locality Pine)

    · “First National Channel of the Belarusian Radio” transmitter power of 500 kW at a frequency of 279 kHz;

    · “Radio Belarus” transmitter power of 800 kW at a frequency of 1170 kHz.

    Reply
  15. Igor

    Sorry for my English. That’s translation:

    Due to the fact that National Government Broadcasting Company of Belarus Republic refused services of the Belarus Radio and TV Transmitting Center, since April, 01 transmission of radio programs of “1 National Channel of Belarus Radio” and “Radiostation Belarus” on LW, MW and SW bands will stop:
    – by transmitting center in Kolodishci:
    — “1 National Channel of Belarus Radio” on 7255 KHz, 250 KW
    — “Radiostation Belarus” on 11930 KHz, 250 KW
    — “Radiostation Belarus” on 11730 KHz, 150 KW
    — “1 National Channel of Belarus Radio” on 6080 KHz, 150 KW
    – by Osipovich transmitting center in Sosnovy:
    — “1 National Channel of Belarus Radio” on 279 KHz, 500 KW
    — “Radiostation Belarus” on 1170 KHz, 800 KW

    Reply

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