Radios in Games: This War of Mine

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Aaron Kuhn, who writes:

Another “Radio in Popular Culture” tidbit for you since they seem so popular:

2014 war survival game “This War of Mine“, released on multiple platforms, features a simulated shortwave radio you can build and use as part of the game.

After building the radio from components/parts you find, it allows you to use the radio on a daily basis to gather intelligence about what’s going on out in the streets around you.

This video capture I took shows what in-game tuning of this “Rad” brand radio looks like:

Click here to view on YouTube.

Thank you Aaron. How very cool! I wonder if this is where The Man in the High Castle got the idea for the virtual resistance radio.

Spread the radio love

4 thoughts on “Radios in Games: This War of Mine

  1. Chris Freitas

    I think in Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain, there is a Sony ICF 2010 while Venom Snake is in the hospital in Cyprus (which the setting takes place in 1984). Also another game that I first remember see a “radio” is Pokemon Gold & Silver and you can tune into different stations. It is neat how radio gets put into some of my favorite video games.

    Reply
  2. Kobaljov

    Some other occurences in computer games

    Firewatch: here a handheld walkie-talkie radio is a basic element of the gameplay
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdUYYnfRdl8

    Fallout 4 (and as I remember in the previous Fallout games, e.g. 3) the protagonist have a radio receiver in a forearm computer and the game have numerous stations (broadcast or ham radio) and relay towers. Some missions even requires to locate the source of a broadcast. Pictures (from graphics upgrade mods), tabletop receiver:
    http://www.nexusmods.com/fallout4/mods/4230/?
    ham radio:
    http://www.nexusmods.com/fallout4/mods/18836/?

    Wasteland 3 mission promo:

    Reply
  3. Frank

    Reminds me, in the ca. 10 year old “Call of Duty – World at War” game for Nintendo DS, almost half the missions end with you typing morse code onto a morse key filling the touch screen (“speed” maybe 5-6 WPM), mostly on captured equipment, to alert your troops for pick up. Nothing fancy, just pushing the touchsceen long and short as the dots and dashes walk underneath.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.