Update: Eton Elite Satellit expected Q4 with pre-order price of $349 US

Universal Radio has posted a product page for the new Eton Elite Satellit.

Pre-Order

As they have done in the past, Universal is offering a “pre-order” discounted price of $349.95 that will not be charged to the buyer until the unit actually ships.

Availability

Universal expects the Elite Satellit to ship sometime in the 4th Quarter of 2019.

I gather the Elite Satellit is still very much in the design and development stage, so I would even take the expected availability date with a grain of salt. Much may depend on how well the initial prototypes perform in evaluations. With that said, I’m sure Eton will do all they can to have the Elite Satellit ready for the 2019 holiday season.

Not a hoax–!

I’ve gotten a number of emails and comments from readers asking if the Elite Satellit is a hoax. I can assure you it is not. 🙂

I get why so many are skeptical, though. It’s not often that a legacy receiver–one that’s been off the market for nearly a decade–is re-introduced with an identical chassis, and with the promise of some internal upgrades. In fact, I can’t think of a time this has happened in the past.

Features and Specifications

All we know about the Elite Satellit is what is mentioned in Universal’s product description:

The Eton Elite Satellit is simply the finest full-sized portable in the world. The Elite Satellit is an elegant confluence of performance, features and capabilities. The look, feel and finish of this radio is superb. The solid, quality feel is second to none. The digitally synthesized, dual conversion shortwave tuner covers all long wave, mediums wave (AM) and shortwave frequencies. HD Radio improves audio fidelity and adds additional programming without a subscription fee. Adjacent frequency interference can be minimized or eliminated with a choice of three bandwidths [7.0, 4.0, 2.5 kHz]. The sideband selectable Synchronous AM Detector further minimizes adjacent frequency interference and reduces fading distortion of AM signals. IF Passband Tuning is yet another advanced feature that functions in AM and SSB modes to reject interference. AGC is selectable at fast or slow. High dynamic range permits the detection of weak signals in the presence of strong signals. All this coupled with great sensitivity will bring in stations from every part of the globe. Organizing your stations is facilitated by 500 user programmable presets with alpha labeling, plus 1200 user definable country memories, for a total of 1700 presets. You can tune this radio many ways such as: direct shortwave band entry, direct frequency entry, up-down tuning and scanning. Plus you can tune the bands with the good old fashioned tuning knob (that has new fashioned variable-rate tuning). There is also a dual-event programmable timer. Whether you are listening to AM, shortwave, FM or FM-HD, you will experience superior audio quality via a bridged type audio amplifier, large built in speaker and continuous bass and treble tone controls. RDS is included. Stereo line-level output is provided for recording or routing the audio into another device such as a home stereo. The absolutely stunning LCD has 4 levels of backlighting and instantly shows you the complete status of your radio.

Many receiver parameters such as AM step, FM coverage, beep, kHz/MHz entry etc., can be set to your personal taste via the preference menu. The Elite Satellit has a built in telescopic antenna for AM, shortwave and FM reception. Additionally there is a switchable antenna jack (PAL male) for an external antenna. Universal will offer antenna jack adapters.

This radio comes with a protective carry bag and AC adapter or may be operated from four D cells (not included). The Eton Elite Satellit is for world explorers who want to travel first class.

I agree with Post contributor Guy Atkins: the Elite Satellit appears to be based on the Eton E1 analog circuitry. Guy points to three clues in this recent comment:

  • Exact same three I.F. bandwidths as on the E1 (7.0, 4.0, 2.5 kHz). If this is a DSP radio, why only these three bandwidths?
  • Selectable sideband synchronous AM detector, as found in the E1. I’m not aware of any SiLabs chips that can provide *selectable* sidebands on sync AM.
  • I.F. passband shift control. Again, this is not a feature in any consumer DSP radio I know of.

Of course, all of the specifications Universal has published are “preliminary and subject to change.”

As I mentioned in a previous post, you can count on us to review the Elite Satellit as soon as it’s available.

Click here to pre-order the Eton Elite Satellit at Universal Radio.

To follow Eton Elite Satellit updates, bookmark this tag.


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28 thoughts on “Update: Eton Elite Satellit expected Q4 with pre-order price of $349 US

  1. Neil Myers

    As of 8/7/19, the Universal Radio web page for this radio says, ” This new model is expected no sooner than sometime in the first half of 2020.” This reminds me of the previous pattern for the Eton E1. If Eton ever does bring the Elite Satellit to market, it probably won’t be before all radio becomes digital.

    Reply
  2. Park McGraw

    I wish the vertical spacing for the bands and functions menu along the right half of the LCD display on this version or the Eton Elite Satellite lined up better with the vertical spacing of the corresponding push button controls mounted on the chassis. Hence a LCD that looks like the placement of the content or mechanical controls on the case were done to tight design specs, a.k.a. attention to detail, resulting in a more refined look, akin to Japanese designed portable radios from the 1960-2000 where the mechanical controls and display had better matching, thus not appearing as if the component selection was a just good enough choice, but rather an exact match or fit. If the outside is like this, what is the inside like?

    Reply
      1. Bob Faucett

        Yes, the pdf file that “oscar” linked is for the Field BT but look at the very bottom of the file (data sheet). It shows the Elite Satellit. Also note that the datasheet is copyright 2019. So, at least Eton is showing it in some of their printed material.

        Reply
  3. Pat Blakely

    I notice they are going with a whip antenna for AM radio rather than a ferrite. Since this radio doesn’t have XM , why would they continue to do this???

    What would be great is an AM ferrite antenna but the ability to use the longwire instead? The Tecsun PL-360 has it set up that way,

    Will Drake be offering support on this radio?

    Reply
  4. David Branscome

    Actually, I believe that the screen on the radio that is pictured here is the screen from the old E1XM. So I don’t believe that this is an accurate photo. They didn’t want to circulate a photo with a blank screen so they just threw that on to give people something to look at. Unfortunately, it’s causing confusion about the true features. My opinion. And yes, I pre-ordered one even though I realize that shortwave broadcasting isn’t what it used to be.

    Reply
  5. gdel

    it seems very good radio but … what stations are going to be heard in sw if every day there is less sometimes the bands are empty, could have included drm that if it would be a novelty.

    parece muy buena radio pero…. que emisoras se van a escuchar en sw si cada dia hay menos a veces las bandas estan vacias, podrina haber incluido drm eso si seria una novedad.

    Reply
  6. Denis

    Hello. Well I gave in and preordered this morning. I did so for the sole reason that I absolutely need a radio and I had been shopping eBay for an E1 and I’ll be darned if I pay 800$US for a ten-year old radio which would end up costing 1100$ of my Canadian money. So 345$ for a new unit sounds fair, and let’s hope we don’t have to wash off that rubbery paint.

    I have owned countless HF/VHF radios in the past, not to mention two E1s, cheap Grundig S350DL, S450DL, one absurdly clunky Satellit 800 Millenium and two Satellit 750s. I keep my hopes up that whoever manufactures this radio will put it in a class of its own. But this is 2019 and things more often than not end up cheaper, way cheaper than ever.

    I have been a SXM subscriber since 2001 and would never consider adding this option to a portable HF radio so in my opinion, RDS and HD will make for a much better complement.

    Basically, the only thing I’m really looking for is a radio that performs well between 15 and 30 MHz something that only the E1 seemed to do well. And DSP or not, I hope FM is as selective as the E1 was. if it doesn’t perform as well as the E1 on those two fronts, it’ll be on a quick return trip.

    Reply
  7. Park McGraw

    I wish the Elite Satellit had marine band for NOAA weather and N.A. railroad, along with aviation band.

    Reply
  8. John Figliozzi

    A couple of comments, not exactly informed. This pictured radio is a little deceiving. While the form factor looks the same as the E1XM, I think we’ll see some significant differences internally and on the screen.. For one thing, nowhere do the words “Elite Satellit” appear on this depiction. Neither does the word “Grundig” which Eton has used prominently and consistently in its shortwave products up to now. Sirius/XM will NOT be a feature of this radio. I think the description provided at least implies this. The screen depiction is exactly likely that for the advance publicity for the E1XM, so is a placeholder only. HD and RDBS capability will be features of this radio. This also implies different architecture for the Elite Satellit. The E1XM architecture was based on a Drake design, most likely the SW8. It’s doubtful that the Elite Satellit is as well. The E1XM was manufactured in India; the Elite Satellit almost certainly will be assembled in China. Those that suggest this will not be a DSP radio look to be on the right track in my opinion. However, the disclaimer that the description provided is subject to change could prove to be somewhat of a misdirection when it comes to some details that look solid now. Frankly, I’d feel better about this new model if some part of Drake remains a part of it — especially if it proves to be more an analog than digital design. I’m also not concerned about the potential for quality control issues. Universal Radio appears to have a significant role in in roll out of this new model and I’m confident it will stand behind it. However, there is every chance the 4th Q 2019 date will slip.

    Reply
  9. Jason

    There are 2 things about this radio that suggest it would inappropriate for someone who lives outside the USA to buy it:
    1) HD radio support (but no DAB+ support)
    2) XM Satellite radio isn’t available outside the USA

    Is the telescopic antenna really used for MW/AM reception as the universal radio page suggests?

    Reply
  10. Adi

    What about record/playback on SD card? for that price… in 2019…?
    Who needs 1700 presets? any of you need more than 200?

    Reply
  11. Mike Bennett

    …how good will it the Eton Satellit be on the AM band, compared to the CCrane 2E?…..will it have a long twin antenna, also?
    …we purchase these radios to listen to the best AM dx’ing reception and wish it to be as good as the Panasonic RF-2200 or the CCrane 2E!….any thoughts?

    Reply
    1. Jason

      The description says the telescopic antenna is used for AM/MW?

      “The Elite Satellit has a built in telescopic antenna for AM, shortwave and FM reception.”

      Reply
      1. Mike Bennett

        …thank you for the reply!….but, how will this radio compare to the CCrane 2E on AM, as does it have a twin-coil ferrite antenna (or equivalent), just like the Crane? I live in the North American Mid-west, so to me AM reception is a must have, and the other BANDS are nice, too!..any thoughts on the AM, and why can’t anyone build a Panasonic RF-2200 for the 21st century…?

        Reply
        1. John Figliozzi

          Those that have used the original E1 for MW/LW dxing say that it performs very well off the whip with the one drawback that nulling out interfering signals is difficult. The ferrite rod was not part of the E1’s design because of the noise generated by the screen. The description for the new Elite Satellit says that the screen is “improved” and implies that the visual contrast might be sharper, but it says nothing about addressing that noise issue. One would think that the outboard twin coil antenna tethered to the new Elite Satellit (or the E1 for that matter) could adequately address that shortfall. But I haven’t seen any experiences along that line posted.

          Reply
  12. Pverranod

    I would think that it would not be a stretch to have a spectrum display in a radio of this “class”

    Reply
    1. John Figliozzi

      The only “traditional” receiver that has such a display to my knowledge is the ICOM-IC7300 which retails in the $1000+ range, so I think it would be a stretch.

      Reply
  13. Patrick Fitzpatrick

    Two things I noticed in that description. RDS is included on FM. That is not on the E1. And the filter bandwidths are 7, 4 and 2.5 kHz. It is 2.3 on the E1

    Reply
  14. Paul

    Decisions, decisions, … should one pre-order to save $50, or should one wait a year for Eton to work out the bugs after release, as has been the norm with some of their radios in the past? Is there anyway for the user to update this radio’s firmware?

    Reply
    1. 13dka

      It would be the first chinese portable that lets end users do that, and I’ve never heard of such a portable that actually got a firmware upgrade after purchase.

      Reply
        1. 13dka

          Actually the E1 was made in India IIRC and we have no idea where the new radio will be made. 🙂 There’s also a big exception: Kaito actually installed firmware upgrades on early PL-880s, however this is something only big retailers with good connections the manufacturer can do, the radio must have some hardware provisions for playing in the new firmware. If there’s no “mystery connector” or socketed chip, all they can do is swapping the entire radio and that’s a rare exception as well. At any rate you can’t do that at home, you’ll have send in the radio and pay for shipping and return, if you didn’t buy the radio from such a “big retailer” you may be out of luck.

          Reply
  15. Steve

    Looking in the top right corner of the display you see a Satellite option which is the same place on the original where the XM option is. Makes me think there is the possibility the new E1 will support XM.

    Reply

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