Category Archives: Videos

Video: Lightbulb vs Radio Beacon by Thomas Cholakov (N1SPY)

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Ivan Cholakov (NO2CW), who writes:

My 11 year old son Tommy (N1SPY) completed a project where he compared a 1W lightbulb to a .25 W radio beacon that he put together and bet that the radio beacon can be heard around the world. I asked him to document his activities as he went along. The project took a couple of months but is now complete and we stitched together a video of his activities.

Click here to view on YouTube.

Wow–Tommy, you’ve done an amazing job here!

I especially like how you’ve taken time to explain the principles behind the various steps of the process. Brilliant job!

Tommy, your future videos are always welcome here. Keep up the good work and we’d love to hear how many new countries you’ve racked up on your WSPR system!

Carl Laufer of RTL-SDR.com on HamRadioNow

(Source: Southgate ARC)

Carl Laufer’s RTL-SDR on HamRadioNow

Carl Laufer isn’t a ham (yet), but he got caught up in the RTL-SDR craze in his home town, Auckland NZ, as he was completing his PHD

He began writing about them, and selling them, on his blog at www.RTL-SDR.com, and soon discovered that the little SDR receiver dongles could stand some improvement.

So he designed ways to make them work better, and contracted a Chinese manufacturer to build them with his mods. That just about doubled the price, from $10 to about $20. Yeah, big deal.

TAPR invited Carl to come to the 2017 Dayton Hamvention to talk about them at both their Friday Forum (part of HamRadioNow Episode 324) and as the main speaker at the TAPR/AMSAT Banquet.

And we got him for a conversation with HamRadioNow’s KN4AQ and PhasingLine’s Chicken With Fries in the SIB back in Tent City.

Watch HRN 328: Carl Laufer’s RTL-SDR on HamRadioNow:

Click here to watch on YouTube.

I got to meet Carl at the Hamvention this year–what a great guy and his website is certainly the best source of information about the RTL-SDR.

I should note that I also met with contributor, Mike Ladd, in person at the Hamvention. Mike now works for SDRplay.

This is one of the great things about gatherings like the Hamvention–it brings together so many people that you’d otherwise likely never meet in person!

The SDRplay RSP2 on Linux: a step-by-step guide

The SDRplay RSP2

Many thanks to Jon Hudson with SDRplay who recently shared the following video by Kevin Loughin which details the installation and operation of of the RSP2 on Linux. Kevin has written scripts that make the installation process more accessible to those not as familiar with Linux.

According to Kevin, this will run on Ubuntu 16.04 and other Debian-based Linux distributions.

Check out Kevin’s video below (or on YouTube). Kevin also published a step-by-step guide on his blog.

Click here to view on YouTube.

Click here to read step-by-step instructions on Kevin’s blog.

Mike’s SDRuno tutorial videos for the SDRplay RSP series

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mike Ladd (with SDRplay) who notes that he has been working on a series of tutorials for operating the SDRuno.

In the past week, I’ve had no less than two readers ask about tutorial resources for SDRuno, and the RSP series software defined radios, so Mike’s message is timely.

So far, Mike has covered the following topics (click link to watch video):

  1. Basic layout and settings
  2. SDRuno with VAC (part 1)
  3. SDRuno with VAC (part 2)
  4. SDRuno Noise Reduction
  5. Memory Panel (part 1)
  6. Memory Panel (part 2)
  7. RSP1 and RSP 2 calibration
  8. SDRuno VAC & DSDdecoder

Mike’s videos are very clear and comprehensive. For example, check out his first video which outlines SDRuno layout and basic settings:

Mike is continuously adding new tutorial videos, so check out the full updated playlist on YouTube.

Great job, Mike!

The Bonito Boni Whip goes from strength-to-strength: hardcore DXing in compact package

Hi there, subscribers to the Oxford Shortwave Log YouTube channel and regular readers of this excellent website will be aware that I have been using a Bonito Boni whip E-field wideband antenna for a couple of months now. You may have seen my previous post here, detailing some excellent initial DX results achieved with the Boni Whip. What makes this antenna so compelling for a DXer such as myself is simply that it’s so light and compact; I can literally take it anywhere. Currently it lives in a small flight case (see above & below) on the back seat of my car, with either my Sony ICF-SW55 or Eton Satellit, a home-brew battery pack (that literally cost pence) and some peripheral bits and pieces; spare batteries, cables etc. I think it’s probably already clear that if you consider the Boni Whip’s performance as a function of portability and price, it’s out there on its own – I’m not aware of another antenna that can match it. Of course, there are H-field antennas, such as the excellent Wellbrook active loops that will effectively reject QRM, if that’s an issue for the user, but at a significant cost delta.

 

Since my last posting, I have continued to use the Boni Whip regularly on my DXpeditions and upload the reception videos to my YouTube channel. I have been nothing but totally impressed with this antenna, to the point that I’ve actually been surprised by the signals I’ve caught and recorded with it. Recent catches include a number of low-power stations from Brazil, including Radio Bandeirantes – Sao Paolo, Radio Voz Missionaria – Camboriu (on the 49 and 31 metre broadcast bands) and Radio Aparecida. Some of these signals are incredibly difficult to hear in Europe at all, let alone well and yet the ultra-compact Boni-Whip running off AA batteries, coupled to the (equally brilliant) Eton Satellit managed it with aplomb. Other catches include Zambia NBC Radio 1 – Lusaka and a signal from Bangladesh Betar that sounded as if the transmitter was 5 miles down the road!

All-in-all, I’m extremely satisfied with the performance of the Bonito Boni Whip and highly recommend it to those DXers requiring a high-performance, compact antenna, for use at home in electrically quiet environments or on any DXpedition. You certainly won’t be disappointed.

Please find embedded reception videos below and text links that will take you to the Oxford Shortwave Log YouTube channel. Thanks for reading/watching/listening and I wish you all great DX.


Click here to watch on YouTube

Click here to watch on YouTube

Click here to watch on YouTube

Click here to watch on YouTube

Click here to watch on YouTube

Click here to watch on YouTube

 

Clint Gouveia is the author of this post and a regular contributor to the SWLing Post. Clint actively publishes videos of his shortwave radio excursions on his YouTube channel: Oxford Shortwave Log. Clint is based in Oxfordshire, England.