Western Australia: New low-power shortwave broadcaster seeking listener reports

Many thank to SWLing Post reader, Stefano Mollo–a licensed Australian broadcaster–who shares the following news:

Hi, Thomas,

I have started test transmissions from Perth, Western Australia, on 5,045 kHz, at 75 watts (300 PEP).

Stefano’s HF transmitter

For the time being, I am using the same audio of my other station–77.4 MHz FM–which you can also find and stream online here: www.77400.fm

My test transmission are on the air from about 7:00 pm to about 10:00 pm every evening, local Perth WA time (11:00 – 14:00 UTC).

Please direct listener reports and any enquiries to 77400fm@gmail.com.

Thank you for sharing your news, Stefano!

Post readers: While 300 watts PEP is a modest broadcast signal, no doubt many in Australia, Oceania and Asia will be able to log Stefano’s station when conditions are favorable. During band openings, his signal might travel quite a distance.

Let’s help Stefano by contacting him with detailed listener reports!

12 thoughts on “Western Australia: New low-power shortwave broadcaster seeking listener reports

  1. Edward

    I am happy to see some small time broadcasters on shortwave and it isn’t dominated by multi-megawatt stations owned by mega-media corporations or governmnets. I will listen and see if I can find the signal.

    Reply
  2. Pingback: Western Australia: New low-power shortwave broadcaster seeking listener reports – dxradio.de

  3. Keith Perron

    If that is in fact the transmitter they are using I know where they bought it. It’s from a seller on e-Bay.

    The seller who is based in Greece also has 25watt, 300watt, 500watt and use to have have 1kW.

    If anything these transmitter are toys. They start at 899Euros and go up to 4999Euros.

    Reply
  4. Dave Carr

    Interesting fact, the both transmitters he’s running are not licensed with the ACMA (The Australian equivalent of the FCC) therefore for all intents and purposes he’s operating a Pirate Radio Station and it’s only a matter of time before the radio branch of the ACMA catches up with him and the fact he’s broadcasting on 77.4 MHz FM (way outside of the FM broadcast band in Australia) was a dead give away after I ran a check of the 2 frequencies on the ACMA Register and they didn’t return any results.

    Best to work this station before it goes dark.

    Reply

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