Are we entering the age of atomic radio?

(Source: arstechnica via Scott Schad)

A new antenna using single atoms could usher in the age of atomic radio

The team tested their device by recording themselves singing “Mary Had a Little Lamb”

JENNIFER OUELLETTE

In the 1950s, atomic clocks revolutionized precision time-keeping. Now we may be on the verge of so-called “atomic radio,” thanks to the development of a new type of antenna capable of receiving signals across a much wider range of frequencies (more than four octaves) that is highly resistant to electromagnetic interference.

An antenna is typically a collection of metal rods that pick up passing radio waves and convert their energy into an electrical current, which is then amplified. One might argue that the good old-fashioned radio antenna has served us well since the dawn of the 20th century, so why do we need anything to replace it?

According to David Anderson of Rydberg Technologies, those antennae are wavelength-dependent, so their size depends on whatever wavelength of signal they are trying to measure (they need to be about half the size of whatever wavelength they are designed to receive). That means you need antennae of several different sizes to measure different radio frequencies.

Anderson is a co-author of a new paper posted to the arXiv describing a novel alternative to conventional antennae, based on vapor cells filled with a gas of so-called “Rydberg atoms.” That just means the atoms are in an especially excited state, well above their ground (lowest-energy) state. This makes them especially sensitive to passing electric fields, like the alternating fields of radio waves. All you need is a means of detecting those interactions to turn them into quantum sensors.[…]

Read the full article at arstechnica.

Click here to download the research paper: An atomic receiver for AM and FM radio communication (PDF).

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5 thoughts on “Are we entering the age of atomic radio?

  1. Jake Brodsky

    As a detector it has some potentially interesting properties: It may be more sensitive. It may be lower noise. However, the phase noise characteristics may be related to the coherence of the laser. That may be the ultimate limiting factor.

    I’ll wait until they have a working model for sale.

    Reply
  2. Rod

    Sounds like a hop. skip and a jump to a “foxhole” radio, it too demodulated RF and is very dependent on a wavelength antenna. The “foxhole”receiver uses a razer blade that is blued to act as a simple diode detector.
    My question is how does one tune the “atomic radio”?

    73 Rod

    Reply
  3. Pingback: Are we entering the age of atomic radio? – dxradio.de

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