Category Archives: Software Defined Radio

SDRplay releases SDRuno version 1.13

SDRuno running the RSP2.

(Source: Jon Hudson, SDRplay)

SDRplay has just released SDRuno version 1.13 which adds the much requested ‘IF Out’ facility for Panadapter use. It also includes the following updates:

Bug Fixes

  • Fixed RSP2 IF AGC/gain slider display issues

Updates

  • Added IF Output mode for transceivers
  • Added 250 Hz to frequency step size list
  • Default page in the settings panels is now the left most page each time SDRuno is started
  • Added RSP2 IF GR/Gain value
  • Added Factory Reset in the Main Window OPT menu (1st Instance only)
  • Improved power function error handling
  • Added support for Sub Modes, Filter BW and Port Selction in the Memory Panel
  • Changed RDS window colour scheme to match other windows
  • Added new hotkeys ‘v’, ‘-‘ and ‘+’ which are for VFO, Out and In zoom buttons in the SP1 window
  • Hotkey ‘b’ now opens AND closes the memory panel
  • Changed the default sync Rig->VRX setting to true
  • API – RefClk o/p no longer stops when the master RSP2 stops streaming

To get this latest version, go to: http://www.sdrplay.com/downloads/

Buyer Beware: Insane RTL-SDR pricing

$300 is an absurd price for this RTL-SDR package.

This morning, while browsing eBay, I noticed a high-production retailer selling an RTL-SDR package for $300 US! (To add insult to injury, this isn’t even the latest version of the RTL-SDR dongle!)

I post this warning message to those who are new to the world of the RTL-SDR.

You should never pay more than $30 US shipped for the latest version of the RTL-SDR dongle unless you’re buying custom enclosures, filtering, etc. In fact, the RTL-SDR package above retails for about $25 shipped via Amazon (though currently out of stock). The RTL-SDR stick alone retails for $20.95 shipped. You can find a number of models between $10-20 on Amazon and eBay.

The majority of eBay sellers list the RTL-SDR at the proper market price.

The allure of the RTL-SDR is its affordability–don’t fall for sellers on eBay, Amazon or elsewhere who list these at outrageous prices.  They’re simply trying to rip you off.

Photo of the new Elad FDM-S3

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Rafman, who shares the following photos that were originally posted by Alberto (I2PHD) on the Elad email reflector. Alberto noted:

“Here it is…. shown for the first time today at the Montichiari Ham Fest. Price TBD….”

Many thanks, Rafman, for the tip!

We’ll continue to post FDM-S3 updates as they become available. I will also plan to review the FDM-S3 when it hits the market.

Click here to view the Elad website.

pantronX Titus II quick update

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Ed, who notes:

I just received a status update on the pantronX Titus II portable SDR from Mike, their chief engineer.

Mike said the self-contained SDR portable will include “SoapySDR as the interface to make it much easier to roll your own SDR app.” Here’s some info about SoapySDR:

https://github.com/pothosware/SoapySDR/wiki

Mike also said, “To be 100% truthful, our biggest push right now is for the international MW & SW broadcasters. They want to go DRM digital is the worst way!”

You might want to share this news with SWLing Post readers.

Thank you for the update, Ed! Click here to view the pantronX website.

North American and European medium wave signals into Oxford, UK

Hi there, I’ve been rather preoccupied of late, initially with the brilliant Tecsun PL-310ET and latterly with the even more brilliant Eton Satellit. However, in the background (as always), I’ve been trying to catch transatlantic medium wave DX. My listening schedule is broadly based on shortwave DXing during daylight hours – when I’m not at work of course, typically a Friday afternoon or at weekends – and always with a portable. Evenings usually start off with a tune around the tropical bands, followed by setting up the Elad FDM DUO to run some medium wave spectrum recordings overnight. In the past few days though, my daylight DXing has been bolstered by my NooElec RTL-SDR and ‘Ham it up’ upconverter. I bought the device over a year ago and after some initial exceitement, it quickly became quite obvious that I needed a reciever with a bit more ‘oomph’! However, it’s actually proving very useful to view signals on a  spectrum, even when I’m conducting most or all of my listening on a different (i.e. higher performing) receiver. Ultimately, the RTL-SDR is always going to be a compromise, with relatively limited sensitivity, but because by it’s very nature it has excellent selectivity, overall it’s a reasonable performer. My particular RTL-SDR performs quite well if a decent antenna is employed with it, such as a longwire or the Wellbrook ALA1530 active loop.

Anyway, back to the medium wave DX. In the past month or two, I’ve copied a number of stations from North America, with really nice signals, including WRCR Rampano – New York, WFED Federal News Radio – Washington DC, WENE – Endicott and WUNR – Brookline from Newton, Mass. I’ve also recorded a lovely interval signal from RAI Radio 1, Milano and further European signals from Magyar Radio, Budapest and Radio Slovenija 1, from Ljubljana. During the past 18 months or so of DXing, I have been mostly ignoring signals coming into Oxford from the continent. However, that changed a little after I stumbled across the RAI Radio 1 interval signal, which complete with the rather rousing Italian National Anthem, inspired me to dig out some more European DX. I’m actually finding European DX quite rewarding, particularly because it feels new again – not surprising since I haven’t listened to Europeans on medium wave for any length of time since the 1980s. I hope you enjoy the reception videos – embedded video and text links follow below and I wish you all the very best DX. 


Click here to watch on YouTube

 

Click here to watch on YouTube

 

Click here to watch on YouTube

 

Click here to watch on YouTube

 

Click here to watch on YouTube

 

Click here to watch on YouTube

 

Click here to watch on youtube

 

Click here to watch on YouTube

Clint Gouveia is the author of this post and a regular contributor to the SWLing Post. Clint actively publishes videos of his shortwave radio excursions on his YouTube channel: Oxford Shortwave Log. Clint is based in Oxfordshire, England.