Tag Archives: Radio Caroline

Radio Caroline to broadcast on 648 kHz mediumwave

(Source: Southgate ARC and Mike Terry)

Caroline to be on 648 kHz with 1 kW ERP

We can now announce that our AM frequency will be 648 kHz with a power of 1000 watts. This is ERP or simply the power radiated by the aerial.

A transmitter was imported from the Continent a few days ago and is now being modified to suit the frequency. There are further hurdles, but as you can see progress is being made.
http://www.radiocaroline.co.uk/#home.html

It’s taken Radio Caroline 53 years to get an AM licence and it was perceived as a threat to the BBC for many years.

Ironically 648 kHz was best known for transmitting the BBC World Service in English around the clock on 648 kHz from September 1982 until March 2011 from the Orfordness transmitting station on the Suffolk coast.

Former Radio Caroline DJ strives to become leader of Seborga, Italy

(Source: The Telegraph via Andy Sennitt)

A British-born DJ from Crawley is vying to become the ruler of a tiny self-declared principality in Italy, an honour that would earn him the enviable title “His Tremendousness”.

Mark Dezzani hopes to become the Prince of Seborga, a village overlooking the Italian Riviera that unilaterally declared its independence from Rome in the 1960s, arguing that it was never properly incorporated into Italy when the country was unified in 1861.

He will go head to head with the current ruler of the miniscule territory, His Tremendousness Marcello I, a businessman and former speedboat champion whose real is Marcello Menegatto.

Click here to continue reading…

Caroline North on air this weekend

(Source: Mike Terry via Southgate ARC)

Caroline North is back this weekend

Caroline North is back this weekend live from the MV Ross Revenge on the River Blackwater Estuary near Bradwell, Essex.

Relayed on 1368 kHz with a transmitter power of 20kw from the Isle of Man.

According to Manx Radio’s website as well as being heard in the Isle of Man, the AM service is also audible in Southern Scotland, in the North West, in North Wales and in the West of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Also online worldwide.

The past, present and future of UK pirate radio

Radio Caroline circa 1960’s.

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Aaron Kuhn who shares this excellent article from Dazed:

The influence of pirate radio has endured despite government crackdowns and the rise of legitimate alternatives – today, it continues to thrive, both legally and otherwise

Drive around some parts of London today and you’re still liable to hear mainstream radio broadcasts drowned out by fleeting bursts of unfamiliar music. Pirate radio stations have been illegally hijacking the FM dial since the 1990s, but while the pirate scene is far smaller than it was in its heyday, the movement is still thriving on a local scale, while a vibrant array of online-only stations are inspired by the energy and spirit of the pirates. To put it simply, pirate radio never left London.

The UK’s pirate radio story starts with Ronan O’Rahilly’s Radio Caroline back in the 1960s, famously avoiding the authorities by broadcasting from international waters, but it was really the 1990s that paved the way for pirate radio in this country. Its evolution loosely follows that of the underground rave scene, which mainstream radio wouldn’t touch in its early days. “It’s the closest thing to mass organised zombie-dom,” BBC Radio 1 DJ Peter Powell said of acid house. “I really don’t think it should go any further.” Needless to say, it wasn’t going anywhere, and between 1988 and 89, pirate radio stations rapidly started to appear to serve a youth hungry for new sounds that weren’t being catered to by mainstream radio. By 1989, there were over 60 pirate radio stations operating in London alone.

While the first pirates – from Sunrise to Centreforce to Fantasy – mostly played music from America and European countries like Belgium, it didn’t take long for the British youth to start doing their own thing. “The UK kids realised people were making music in their bedrooms and they thought ‘I can fucking do that!’” exclaims Uncle Dugs, one of the UK’s leading authorities on pirate radio. Having been involved in radio (both legal and otherwise) for over 20 years, Dugs’ new book Rave Diaries and Tower Block Tales documents life as a young raver turned award-winning DJ after years on the pirate scene. As he explains, by 1991, London’s underground music landscape had become “99% UK producers and DJs,” transforming from acid house to hardcore and then to jungle. As London’s underground grew, so did its pirate presence, with legendary stations like Weekend Rush, Kool FM, Pulse FM, Innocence, and Defection springing up by the end of 1991. “You could flick through the radio and at every .2 on the dial there was a pirate station,” Dugs laughs. “There wasn’t even space on the radio for a new one.”[…]

Click here to read the full article at Dazed.

Amateur Radio Special Event Station on Radio Caroline

Ross-Revenge-Caroline

(Source: Southgate ARC)

Many readers will remember with fond memories from the 1960s, 70s and 80s, the famous offshore radio station Radio Caroline and the last ship they used to broadcast from, the MV Ross Revenge.

From today, a group of amateurs from the Martello Tower Group are operating special event station GB5RC from the Ross Revenge, moored in the Blackwater Estuary near West Mersea and Bradwell-on-Sea in Essex to celebrate five decades of offshore radio broadcasting.

Over the last few weeks, the group have set up quarter wave verticals for 40m, 20m and 15m along with a 5/8 wave for 10m and dipoles for 80m and 40m at various locations on the ship in preparation for the special event station.  They also hope to be able to operate VHF and UHF for local contacts and with some D-STAR and DMR thrown in for good measure.

GB5RC will be on the air from today, the 5th August until Monday 8th August with two stations operating simultaneously running full UK legal output power.  Let’s hope HF conditions are decent.

The Ross Revenge has been the home of Radio Caroline since August 1983 and although broadcasts directly from the ship ended in 1991, the station continues via the internet and once a month, live programmes are broadcast from the Ross Revenge with the help of the Manx AM transmitters on 1368kHz.

For more information see either https://www.qrz.com/db/GB5RC
or the Martello Tower Group website
http://www.martellotowergroup.com/gb5rc.html

Direct QSLs to G6NHU, bureau via GB5RC