Author Archives: Thomas

Unidentified HF frequency hopping station

(Source: Southgate ARC via Mike Hansgen)

IARUMS reports on mystery frequency hopping station

IARU-R1 Monitoring System reports an intriguing transmission has been spotted giving short beeps exactly on each second, frequency hopping between 10108-10115 kHz and 18834/18899 kHz

One of the mysterious transmitters is located in the vicinity of Chicago, near the town of Aurora or Elburn, Illinois.

The International Amateur Radio Union Monitoring System (IARUMS) Region 1 November 2018 newsletter can be read at
http://www.iarums-r1.org/iarums/news2018/news1811.pdf

Reports of Amateur Band intruders can be logged on the IARU Region 1 Monitoring System Logger at
http://peditio.net/intruder/bluechat.cgi

Monitor the short wave bands on-line with a web based SDR receiver at
http://www.websdr.org/

IARU Monitoring System (IARUMS)
https://www.iarums-r1.org/

Have any Post readers heard this station?  I would love to hear a recording or see this station on a spectrum display.

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CDS Shortwave: An interactive audio piece from Duke CDS

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Ron Chester (W6AZ), who writes:

Have you seen this site from Duke University’s Center For Documentary Studies?

Shortwave is so cool that the digital nerds are now working on reproducing it on the Internet. It’s got a great interface, authentic sounding noise between stations, a train passing by on one station, some nice music, several interesting spoken pieces and at least two undocumented stations, one a numbers station, maybe both. It even has an audio to text display rolling across the bottom. If you haven’t already posted it on the SWLing Post, I think folks there would enjoy it a lot. I certainly did!

Thank you, Ron. I love the interface and think it’s fascinating that they chose the metaphor of shortwave radio as a means of interacting with these audio pieces.

Thank you for sharing!

Click here to check out CDShortwave.org.

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WRTH 2019 available for order

(Source: Nicholas Hardyman WRTH)

World Radio TV Handbook 2019

Published 7 December 2018 – Order your copy today!

We are delighted to announce the publication of the 73rd edition of WRTH.

For full details of WRTH 2019 and to order a copy please visit our website at www.wrth.com where you can also order the B18 WRTH Bargraph Frequency Guide on CD and Download.

WRTH 2019 is also available for pre-order, for readers in the USA, from Amazon.com or Universal Radio in Ohio.

I hope you enjoy using this new edition of WRTH and the new CD.

Best regards,

Nicholas Hardyman

Publisher

Click here to visit WRTH online.

WRTH Retailers:

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Alan Roe’s updated B18 season guide to music on shortwave

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Alan Roe, who notes:

I have now compiled my Music on Shortwave listing for the B-18 broadcast
period.

Alan, thanks so much for keeping this brilliant guide updated each broadcast season and for sharing it here with the community!

Click here to download a PDF copy of Alan Roe’s Music on Shortwave B-18.

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Winter radio life and preparing for power outages

Listening to a local station with the BC-348-Q until we lose power.

Here at SWLing Post HQ we’ve been under a Winter Storm Warning since yesterday–it’s not set to expire until sometime tomorrow. This storm hasn’t been all snow–it’s a mixture of snow and ice. If this continues, I fully expect to lose power at some point today.

In general, we’re prepared to handle this sort of thing: our refrigerator and freezer are powered by solar and completely off-grid, we have a super efficient RAIS woodstove to keep us warm and of course, we have a generator at the ready if needed.

Playing radio off-grid

As I write this post, I’m listening to the Signal Corps BC-348-Q (photo above) which is tuned to a local AM broadcaster. It’ll fill my shack with local news/tunes and its vintage valves will do a fine job warming this small room until the power eventually goes out.

When it does go out, I’ll switch to my blackout buddy, the CommRadio CR-1A.

I find that the CR-1A is nearly ideal for off-grid and field listening, as long as you have a good external antenna. The internal Li-Ion battery powers the thing for ages and it has an incredibly capable receiver.

Of course, I also have an Elecraft KX3 and KX2 which can be powered by battery, but I tend to use the CR-1A for broadcast listening and save the KX2/KX3 for off-grid ham radio QRP fun.

In addition, I have the new battery-powered CommRadio CTX-10 transceiver in the shack.

I’ve been receiving numerous emails about this particular field rig because there are so few CTX-10 reviews out there even though it’s been on the market since late July.

Please note that I’ve been giving the CTX-10 a thorough evaluation over the past few weeks and plan to publish my initial review in the next few days.

Bye-bye noise!

Even though I live in a very rural and remote area with little-to-no RFI, when the power is cut, my noise floor still drops . We’re not immune–like most homes, we have power supplies and devices that emit radio interference.

It’s funny: most urban radio enthusiasts I know don’t fear power outages, they prepare for and embrace them! When all of those RFI-spewing devices go silent, it’s simply amazing what you can hear from home on frequencies below 30 MHz with pretty much any receiver.

Personally, as long as I have a means of 1.) powering my radios, and 2.) making coffee (extremely important), I consider myself properly prepared.

I’ve always got those two points covered.

Bring it, old man winter!  I’m ready to play radio!


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