Tag Archives: UNESCO World Radio Day

Celebrating World Radio Day 2022!

Today is UNESCO World Radio Day and this year the theme of trust highlights the importance of radio as an accessible form of information.

Below are some of the many projects celebrating World Radio Day:


Cities and Memory: Shortwave Transmissions

As mentioned in a previous post, we at the Shortwave Radio Audio Archive are truly honored to have been a resource for this incredible and diverse sound project organized by Cities and Memory.

We encourage you to explore the creative work from over 120 artists and composers.

A great many of these remarkable dynamic works draw on a wide array of recordings from the SRAA; the resulting compositions and soundscapes are rich with sonic textures, evocative collages of sound and memory, which emerge into further sources of inspiration.

Our profound thanks to Cities and Memory––and all of the participating artists––for this truly brilliant collection which you can check out on the Shortwave Transmissions project page.


BBC World Service Documentary: “World Wide Waves ’22: The sounds of community radio”

As we mention in a previous post, this brilliant radio documentary focusing on community radio is available on the BBC World Service website and BBC Sounds

Here’s the description:

For World Radio Day 2022, we tune in to radio stations around the world that connect communities, spark conversations, keep traditions alive and give a voice to their listeners. From Aboriginal Koori Radio in Australia to a community station in India run by rural women from the lowest Dalit caste, the airwaves carry intimate wisdom, vital knowledge, beats and tunes that keep reminding us who we are.

Note that this piece was produced by our friend David Goren, of Shortwaveology fame. Continue reading

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BBC World Service Documentary: “World Wide Waves ’22: The sounds of community radio”

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Kris Partridge, who shares the following:

Just heard a trail for this BBC World Service Radio programme to be broadcast at 12h00 UTC this coming Saturday, 12 February 2022.

Here is the background of the programme:

For World Radio Day 2022, we tune in to some more small radio stations around the world that connect communities, spark conversations, keep traditions alive, empower their listeners and spread happiness with music and stories. From Aboriginal radio in Australia to a community station in India run by rural women from the lowest Dalit caste to a prison station in Texas that gives a voice to inmates on death row, the airwaves carry intimate wisdom, vital knowledge, beats and tunes that keep reminding us who we are.

Here is a link to the programme on BBC Sounds. Obviously the programme will not be available before broadcast, but will on-line be for some time after.

Should the blog readers not hear over the air ‘direct’ the 12h06 UTC broadcast there are repeats on Sunday, 13 at 03h06, 15h06 & 17h06 UTC, Wednesday, 16 at 10h06 UTC & Thursday, 17 at 00h06 UTC.

Here is the link to the ‘official’ UNESCO World Radio Day website: https://en.unesco.org/commemorations/worldradioday

73 de G8AUU

Kris

Thank you so much for the tip, Kris! Really looking forward to this piece!

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UNESCO World Radio Day and International Marconi Day

Radio Taboo in Cameroon

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Grayhat, who writes:

With the sponsorship of UNESCO, two “on air” events will take place February and April, 2022. The events will be the UNESCO World Radio Day and the International Marconi Day 2022

World Radio Day

12 to 13 February 2022
from 00:00 UTC of 12 Feb to 23:59 UTC of Feb
(48 hours)

International Marconi Day

23 to 25 April 2022
From 00:00 UTC of 23 Apr to 23:59 UTC of 25 Apr
(72 hours)

For further information, click on the event names above.

Thank you for the tip! I do note that UNESCO has yet to post details about WRD this year, but I believe they typically publish information only a couple of weeks before the event.

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Today is World Radio Day 2021

Today is UNESCO World Radio Day and this year the theme highlights diversity on the airwaves. Here’s the announcement from UNESCO:

Proclaimed in 2011 by the Member States of UNESCO, and adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2012 as an International Day, February 13 became World Radio Day (WRD).

Radio is a powerful medium for celebrating humanity in all its diversity and constitutes a platform for democratic discourse. At the global level, radio remains the most widely consumed medium. This unique ability to reach out the widest audience means radio can shape a society’s experience of diversity, stand as an arena for all voices to speak out, be represented and heard. Radio stations should serve diverse communities, offering a wide variety of programs, viewpoints and content, and reflect the diversity of audiences in their organizations and operations.

CELEBRATIONS IN 2021
On the occasion of World Radio Day 2021 (WRD 2021), UNESCO calls on radio stations to celebrate this event’s 10th anniversary and the more than 110 years of radio.

This edition of WRD is divided into three main sub-themes:

  • EVOLUTION. The world changes, radio evolves.This sub-theme refers to the resilience of the radio, to its sustainability ;
  • INNOVATION. The world changes, radio adapts and innovate.Radio has had to adapt to new technologies to remain the go-to medium of mobility, accessible everywhere and to everyone;
  • CONNECTION. The world changes, radio connects.This sub-theme highlights radio’s services to our society—natural disasters, socio-economic crises, epidemics, etc.

Click here to check out the UNESCO website devoted to World Radio Day 2020.

Radio Taboo Issa Nyaphaga on the right with a community friend and Radio Taboo listener on the left.

AS mentioned in a previous post, I also suggest you checkout this documentary produced by our friend, David Goren:

World Wide Waves: The sounds of community radio

We may think we live in a digital age, but only half the world is currently online. Across the globe, small radio stations bind remote communities, play a dazzling array of music, educate, entertain and empower people to make change. Cameroon’s Radio Taboo, in a remote rainforest village 100 miles off the grid, relies on solar power; its journalists and engineers are all local men and women. Radio Civic Sfantu Gheorghe in the Danube Delta preserves the history of the community. Tamil Nadu’s Kadal Osai (“the sound of the ocean”) broadcasts to local fishermen about weather, fishing techniques—and climate change. In Bolivia, Radio Pio Doce is one of the last remaining stations founded in the 1950s to organise mostly indigenous tin miners against successive dictatorships. And KTNN, the Voice of the Navajo Nation, helps lift its listeners’ spirits in a time of loss and grief.

Produced by David Goren
Presented by Maria Margaronis.

Click here to listen on the BBC World Service.

Happy World Radio Day, everyone!

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World Radio Day 2020

Today is UNESCO World Radio Day and this year the theme highlights diversity on the airwaves. Here’s the announcement from UNESCO:

On World Radio Day 2020 (WRD 2020), UNESCO calls on radio stations to uphold diversity, both in their newsroom and on the airwaves.

Radio is a powerful medium for celebrating humanity in all its diversity and constitutes a platform for democratic discourse. At the global level, radio remains the most widely consumed medium. This unique ability to reach out the widest audience means radio can shape a society’s experience of diversity, stand as an arena for all voices to speak out, be represented and heard. Radio stations should serve diverse communities, offering a wide variety of programs, viewpoints and content, and reflect the diversity of audiences in their organizations and operations.

This edition of WRD is divided into three main sub-themes:

    • ADVOCATING for pluralism in radio, including a mix of public, private and community broadcasters.
    • ENCOURAGING representation in the newsroom, with teams comprised of diverse society groups.
    • PROMOTING a diversity of editorial content and programme types reflecting the variety of the audiences.

Click here to check out the UNESCO website devoted to World Radio Day 2020.

Happy World Radio Day, everyone!

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United Nations: Radio still a powerful worldwide tool for ‘dialogue, tolerance and peace’

Post-earthquake, Ears To Our World radios continue to be a vital link for those in need in Haiti. Here, Erlande, who suffered a stroke in her early 30s and can barely walk, listens to one of our self-powered Etón radios. (Photo: ETOW)

(Source: United Nations News via Mike Hansgen)

“Even in today’s world of digital communications, radio reaches more people than any other media platform” explained the UN chief, adding that it “conveys vital information and raises awareness on important issues”.

“And it is a personal, interactive platform where people can air their views, concerns, and grievances” he added, noting that radio “can create a community”.

UN Radio was established on 13 February 1946, and since 2013, the day has been commemorated to recognize radio as a powerful communication tool and a low-cost medium.

“For the United Nations, especially our peacekeeping operations, radio is a vital way of informing, reuniting and empowering people affected by war”, said Mr. Guterres.

Despite the rise of the internet, many parts of the world, especially remote and vulnerable communities, have no access, making radio broadcasting via transmitters, a vital lifeline. Joining a community of local listeners, also provides a platform for public discussion, irrespective of education levels.

Moreover, it has a strong and specific role in emergency communication and disaster relief.

“On this World Radio Day, let us recognize the power of radio to promote dialogue, tolerance and peace”, concluded the Secretary-General.

Radio still sparking ‘new conversations’

The UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) underscored “the unique, far-reaching power of radio to broaden our horizons and build more harmonious societies”.

“Radio stations from major international networks to community broadcasters today remember the importance of radio in stimulating public debate, increasing civic engagement and inspiring mutual understanding”, UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay said in her message.

Since its invention as the first wireless communication medium well over a hundred years ago, “radio has sparked new conversations and broadcast new ideas into people’s homes, villages, universities, hospitals and workplaces,” she continued. “To this day, dialogue across the airwaves can offer an antidote to the negativity that sometimes seem to predominate online, which is why UNESCO works across the world to improve the plurality and diversity of radio stations”.

The UNESCO chief pointed out that radio has adapted to 21st century changes and offers new ways to participate in conversations that matter, retaining its role as “one of the most reactive, engaging media there is”, especially for the most disadvantaged.

For example, she flagged that rural women constitute one of the most under-represented groups in the media and are twice as likely as men to be illiterate, “so radio can be a critical lifeline to express themselves and access information”.

Ms. Azoulay made clear that “UNESCO provides support to radio stations in sub-Saharan Africa that enable women to participate in public debate, including on often-neglected issues such as forced marriage, girls’ education or childcare”.

Linguistic diversity, and people’s right to express themselves on-air in their own languages, is also crucial – especially true in 2019 which has been designated by the International Year of Indigenous Languages by the UN.“In former conflict zones, radio can dispel fear and present the human face of former foes”, she elaborated, citing North-West Colombia where community radios are healing old wounds “by highlighting the good deeds of demobilized combatants, such as clearing polluted waterways”.

Around the world, the “inclusion of diverse populations makes societies more resilient, more open and more peaceful”, Ms. Azoulay spelled out.

“The challenges we face – whether they be climate change, conflict or the rise in divisive views – increasingly depend on our ability to speak to each other and find common solutions”, she concluded.

Click here to read this article at the UN News website.

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Radio Romania International on World Radio Day 2017

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, David Iurescia (LW4DAF), who shares this message from Radio Romania international:

World Radio Day 2017

On February 13th the radio community celebrates World Radio Day, which over the years has had themes such as “Gender Equality” and “Women’s Empowerment”, “Youth”, and “Radio in Times of Emergency and Disaster”

This year, UNESCO focuses on encouraging radio stations around the world, be they a community, private, or public radio station, to have the tools to be the best radio stations they can be. And that means ensuring they are having continued dialogue with the industry, its audience and the public in general.

In 2017 major themes used along the years, such as gender equality, women’s empowerment, youth and radio in times of emergency and disaster have been brought together under the theme of “public participation” with the tagline “Radio is You!”

It’s important for radio stations to have the conditions that create great programming – in addition to entertainment and information – to find creative ways to promote freedom of expression and address the key issues of today in local communities and across the globe.

So, dear friends, if you are interested in the topic and you would like to contribute, we are looking forward for your thoughts.

Click here to view this post at RRI online.

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